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Inspiration

Explore Asia's most magical temples

By Bob Cooper

Similar to European cathedrals, Asian temples are impressive and intriguing. The history and religious traditions are as robust and complex as the architecture; some are taller than 20-story buildings and have stood for more than 1,000 years. These cities are the most accessible for explorations of many of Asia's most awe-inspiring houses of worship.

Japan

The 33-temple pilgrimage route in Japan's Kansai region is dominated by Kyoto's 12 Buddhist temples, but also includes five or six each in Shiga, Hyogo, Nara, and Osaka—all easily reached from Osaka International Airport. Kyoto's leading temples include the aesthetically beautiful Temple of the Golden Pavilion, the hillside Kiyomizu-dera Temple, and the 13th-century Chion-In Temple. In nearby Nara are the Seven Great Temples, notably the ancient imperial temple, Yakushi-ji, which like most of Kyoto's temples are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Lotus Temple in Delhi, India.

India

Many of Asia's most noteworthy temples are in India—mostly centuries-old Hindu temples. But Delhi's architecturally stunning Lotus Temple is the locus of the Baha'i faith and was completed in 1986. Twenty-seven massive marble “petals" envelop a 2,500-capacity hall that's open to visitors of any faith. It's been called the world's most visited building. Two of the country's other most renowned temples are also in northern India: the lakeside Golden Temple in Amritsar, the world's most revered Sikh temple, and the castle-like Jain Temple in Ranakpur, which is sacred to the Jains.

Singapore

Three special temples are found in Singapore, East Asia's wealthiest and smallest country — the country is smaller than New York City. The Buddhist Tooth Relic Temple and Museum is a visually dazzling building in Chinatown with a giant prayer wheel in the rooftop garden and what believers regard as the tooth of Buddha inside. The Sri Veeramakaliamman Temple in Little India is as lavishly colorful as its name is long. And Sri Mariamman is an exquisite white-and-gold temple that honors the goddess of rain.

South Korea

Seoul is a densely populated city of 10 million, yet tucked right downtown is an island of tranquility — the Jogyesa Temple, which has preserved Korean Zen Buddhism over the years. In the southern mountains of South Korea, meanwhile, travelers can visit the Three Jewels Temples — the most revered Buddhist temples in the country. Tongdosa Temple includes one building that was built 2,600 years ago, the Haeinsa Temple houses all of the Buddhist Scriptures on 81,350 wooden blocks and the Songgwansa Temple is an active monastery in a coastal provincial park.

China

The same 15th-Century emperor who had the Forbidden City built — about 1,000 buildings which include his palace (now the Palace Museum) — also built the Temple of Heaven in Beijing. The central Beijing Taoist temple complex can only be described as mind-boggling. The park-like grounds include numerous ornate palaces, halls, pavilions, turrets, gates, gardens and ponds. Also in Beijing is the Lama (or Yonghe) Temple, a former imperial palace and now a temple and monastery for Tibetan Buddhists.

Thailand

Bangkok's three most popular attractions are conveniently all side by side in the city's historic district. One is the Grand Palace and the other two are grand temples. On one side of the palace is the Temple of the Reclining Buddha, named after the 150-foot-long golden Buddha that's housed in its own mural-decorated chapel. Also in the temple complex is Thailand's largest collection of Buddhas. On the other side of the palace is the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, named after a treasured Buddha carved from a single jade stone.

If you go

United® flies to Osaka, Delhi, Singapore, Seoul and Beijing. United partner All Nippon Airways flies to Bangkok. Visit united.comor use the United app to make your temple travel plans.

Last-minute Valentine's Day weekend getaways

By Nick Harper

With Valentine's Day almost upon us, now is the time to think about expressing your love with something more than a card and a dozen roses.

This year, you can always still buy a card and flowers, but if you're looking to do something different, you may want to consider a romantic weekend getaway. Head for the mountains for a couple of days away from it all, or visit a city for a weekend of culture and cocktails. Whatever your preference, there's a romantic getaway within easy reach. But if you need a little inspiration, here are five great options.

Glacier National Park, Montana

Hike to the heavenly Hidden Lake

For some, a romantic Valentine's trip involves escaping the cold February temps to find sun, sea and sand. For others, it involves embracing the winter conditions and escaping to a world of glaciers, rocky peaks and 600ft waterfalls. If the latter sounds more like you and your partner, head for Montana's vast Glacier National Park. It boasts 700 miles of trails, including a five-mile trail to the photogenic Hidden Lake, while winter also brings ice climbing, sleigh rides and hot spring pools.

And at the end of a day of reconnecting with nature and the one or ones you love, head back to your lodging to sip on a cocktail and gaze up at the stars. Whether you choose a historic grand hotel, a mid-century 'motor inn' or a rustic cabin in the middle of nowhere, you'll discover that each comes with a sense of cozy romance.

United Airlines flies to Glacier Park International Airport

Charleston, South Carolina

Take a carriage ride through the other French Quarter

Stroll the cobbled streets and gas-lit alleys of its French Quarter and Battery district, and it's easy to see why Charleston has been called America's most romantic city. Historic, effortlessly elegant and easily walkable, the city appears to have been laid out like a film set with rambling romantics in mind.

Explore historic downtown or the gardens and plantations that bloom in the winter months, snuggle up on a carriage ride and then watch the sun set over tidal creeks at Bowen's Island Restaurant. Sleep at the historic Jasmine House Inn, then wake and do it all again. The only downside of a plan such as this is that a weekend won't ever be enough, and you won't ever want to go home.

United Airlines flies to Charleston International Airport

Napa, California

Take a hot air balloon ride over Calistoga Ranch

Hot air balloons drifting above Calistoga Ranch

Often, the best romantic escapes are based on illusions —the illusion that you've discovered your own private hideaway, that you've taken a step back from the modern world, that time has somehow slowed down. Those illusions all appear true if you check in at the Calistoga Ranch resort. Set over 157 acres in a secluded Napa Valley canyon, you'll find the space to be 'alone' despite the presence of other like-minded romantics. Check in at a lodge where the trees twist up through the floorboards and the outdoor bath garden blurs the line between indoor and outdoor. With every modern convenience, you'd hope for in a luxury resort, this is 'back to nature' done right.

Situated in a region renowned for its wines and fine dining, add in world-class spa treatments, multiple hillside trails for the energetic adventurers and the option to follow a sunrise hot air balloon ride with a champagne breakfast, and you'll be taking Valentine's to a whole new level. And that won't be any illusion at all.

United Airlines flies to nearby Sacramento and San Francisco International Airports

New York City, New York

Ice skate around the Rockefeller

It's all too easy to overlook New York City as a romantic option because it's, well, just too obvious. But sometimes obvious is obvious for a reason. From gazing down from the top of the Empire State Building to strolling hand-in-hand through the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, to a million-and-one magical moments that only seem possible in the Big Apple, NYC has romance covered from every angle.

With options this endless, you may be wondering where to start planning your trip. Here's what we'd suggest: check in at an iconic hotel such as the St. Regis or the Soho Grand, take a carriage ride through Central Park or ice skate around the Rockefeller Center, order cocktails at a speakeasy, enjoy oysters in Grand Central Terminal and dinner at River Cafe, as the lights of Manhattan sparkle down on the East River. New York is a city packed full of romantic adventures. The story you write is up to you.

United Airlines flies to LaGuardia and Newark Airports

Hunter, New York

Gaze down upon snow-covered mountains

Snow-covered mountains in Hunter, New York

If a romantic break means chilling out and recharging, head to Scribner's Catskill Lodge, 100 miles north of New York City. Perched high on a hill in The Great Outdoors, head here for a cozy weekend where rest and relaxation is strongly encouraged. Hiking, skiing and zip-lining will satisfy the thirst of the outdoor adventurers, while spa pampering, the Mountain Cinema and Scribner's own Whiskey Lounge offer a more leisurely alternative.

Truth be told, while it calls itself a lodge, Scribner's has the feel of a chic boutique hotel, where every luxury is available. Book the Scribner's Suite for the full romantic effect. The 600-square-foot signature suite boasts a queen bed, sunken living room with fireplace and an oversized private terrace with mountain views. Sit here, huddle close and watch the sun sink behind the mountain peaks.

United Airlines flies to LaGuardia and Newark Airports

Getting there

United Airlines offers nonstop flights from U.S. cities to all of these romantic getaways. Visit united.com or use the United app to book your flight.

Wing walking in the sky

By The Hub team

Each week we will profile one of our employee's adventures across the globe, featuring a new location for every employee's story. Follow along every week to learn more about their travel experiences.

By Frankfurt-based Flight Attendant Sabrina Swenson

My first take to the skies on the outside of an aircraft was eight years ago. In 2010, the idea to go wing walking came into my head as I was visiting my mother in the United States. We stopped at a small airport cafe for breakfast. While looking over the menu, certain dishes had nicknames like "the pilot," "the flight attendant," and there it was..."the wing walker!" I thought, "Hmm, that would be fun!" After a lot of research, I proceeded to the outskirts of London, where there was a wing walking operation. At the time, it was the only place in the world to do any type of wing walking, unless you were a professional wing walker. One type of wing walking includes being strapped into a standing position on top of an old Boeing Stearman biplane and from there you take off, riding on top for the entire flight. It was a fantastic experience that I enjoyed immensely. Eight years had past when I heard about a place in Washington state that teaches wing walking, where you can walk out on the wing during the flight. I knew I had to do it, and what better occasion than to celebrate my 50th birthday?

I flew to Seattle and rented a car for the two-hour drive to the small town of Sequim. This beautiful town is surrounded by fields of lavender and is home to lovely people. When I arrived at Mason Wing Walking Academy bright and early the following morning, I found two Boeing Stearman planes in the hangar. The wing walker greeted me and, since I was the only person who had signed up that day, we immediately began training. The entire morning was spent reviewing and practicing the wing walking moves I would make. Over and over, I practiced learning what to do and not to do in flight.

After training all morning and into the early afternoon, the pilot arrived, flying in with his own plane. I learned his other job was as a UPS 747 cargo pilot out of Anchorage, Alaska. That put my mind at ease about his flying abilities. Once he had the biplane ready to go, I climbed in the front seat (as the pilot flies from the back). We took off quickly from the short grass strip, and it wasn't long before we were enjoying the views. The Olympic Peninsula and the gorgeous Strait of Juan de Fuca, which separates Canada and the United States is stunning. The water was a beautiful shade of blue.

Upon reaching the appropriate altitude and slowing down to just above a stall speed, the pilot wagged the wings, letting me know it was time to get out. I looked back to see him giving me the thumbs up. With that encouragement, I left my seat and grabbed the two hand holds above me, fighting the wind the entire time. I carefully made my way up between the cables above me to the pole on top of the plane. I leaned against it and buckled into the four-point harness. After giving the thumbs up, the pilot proceeded to do aerobatics, including loops, barrel rolls and hammerheads. I hung on to the pole for the first loop, but after the first one was completed successfully, I threw caution to the wind and held out both arms! After enjoying the weightlessness of aerobatics, he eventually returned to straight flight so I could enjoy the view. He wagged the wings again, letting me know it was time to come back in. After slowly retreating to my seat, making sure I had three points of contact with the plane at all times, I buckled in once more.

You wouldn't think wing walking is exhausting, but it is. I was given time to recuperate and, once ready, headed out again, this time to the lower wing. This exit was much more challenging as once outside and on the left wing, the prop blast was fierce. I eventually made it to the javelin, which was located between the cables in the middle of the wing, and wedged myself in. This position didn't have a harness; however, I was so wedged between all the cables, I wasn't going anywhere. Once I gave the thumbs up, we were doing aerobatics once more. My favorite was the hammerhead, which is flying straight up for some time, a rotation and then straight down. After much flying around, the pilot once again wagged the wings, indicating that it was time for me to come back to my seat.

I could have spent all day in the sky, but soon enough my time was finished. I slowly climbed back into the plane, making sure to step where I was instructed. The wing of a Boeing Stearman is partially canvas so one step in the wrong place and your foot would make a hole in the structure. I made it back to my seat without incident and strapped myself in one last time. The pilot brought us back to the grass strip and the hangar as I smiled from ear to ear. The professional wing walker congratulated me upon our arrival.

People often ask if I was tethered to the plane. Yes, I was. I had a long cable attached to me and the strut of the plane at all times. However, it's imperative that you take the training seriously and are careful while moving around in the air.

My time wing walking in beautiful Sequim will live on in my memory until my last day. You simply don't forget one of the best days of your life!

The foodie's guide to Asia

By Matt Chernov

It's impossible to underestimate the enormous cultural significance of food throughout Asia. In many countries across the region, the very first thing you'll notice when you arrive is the complex aroma of commingled spices and the tempting scent of grilled meats and cooking fires wafting through the air. It's enough to make your mouth water, and that's before you've even left the airport. Whether you spend your vacation snacking on the delicious street food that's served on virtually every corner in Thailand, having lunch at a stylish tea and noodle house in Japan or enjoying a banquet at a historic dining palace in China, eating is truly the best way to immerse yourself in the city you're visiting. To give you an idea of what dishes you can't afford to miss, here's a regional guide to some of the top meals in Asia.

Bangkok

When you hear the word “yum" spoken in English, it's typically an exclamation of foodie pleasure. Curiously enough, it's also a Thai word that refers to the ideal combination of the five main flavors of Asian cuisine: salty, spicy, sour, savory and sweet. To enjoy the perfect balance of yum while in Bangkok, you'll need to order an authentic plate of pad thai and several skewers of grilled satay. Unlike in America where pad thai is usually eaten in sit-down restaurants, in Thailand it's a hugely popular street food, much like satay, that's often enjoyed while standing in front of a cart on the sidewalk. Between these two iconic dishes, you'll taste several of the core ingredients of Thai cooking, namely fish sauce, lime juice, sriracha, curry paste and Thai chilies.

Tokyo

According to most chefs who specialize in Asian food, the central components of Japanese cooking include dashi (a traditional cooking stock), light and dark soy sauce, mirin, sake and miso. Used together in various combinations, these ingredients help form the basis of umami, a description of the savory taste that's become a familiar word around the world in the last decade or so. A great way to experience the essence of umami while in Tokyo is to spend some quality time with a large bowl of ramen. Ramen is at the center of any conversation that deals with Japanese cuisine and is an essential comfort food that's served everywhere — from award-winning restaurants to tiny neighborhood noodle shops. For a luscious bowl of ramen that you'll never forget, make reservations at the Michelin-starred Tsuta Ramen and prepare to launch your taste buds into orbit. But don't fill up on noodles too quickly, because you'll want to save room for an order of okonomiyaki, the savory egg and cabbage pancake that's been called Japan's version of soul food.

Hong Kong

Although authentic Chinese food incorporates a vast variety of ingredients to achieve maximum deliciousness, the fundamental flavors typically rely on elements like oyster sauce, fresh ginger, chili garlic sauce, rice vinegar and hoisin sauce. Each of these flavors can be found somewhere in Hong Kong's quintessential meal: dim sum. Commonly enjoyed in bite-size portions served in steamer baskets or from rolling carts, dim sum is a tradition that dates back to the teahouses of ancient China. Today, the most popular dim sum items include all manner of dumplings, rolls, buns, cakes, meatballs, tarts, spare ribs and puddings. Since taking colorful food photos is an intrinsic part of any modern vacation, plan to eat at Hong Kong's Yum Cha, an acclaimed restaurant that serves Instagram-worthy dim sum treats. Later on, make your way to Yung Kee restaurant for another essential Hong Kong specialty: roast goose. Since 1942, the chefs at this massive four-floor dining palace have been cooking some of the best fowl in the world.

Hanoi

Along with tropical fruits — like papaya, mango, rambutan and durian — and a wide assortment of rice served in various styles, the primary building blocks of Vietnamese cuisine include fish sauce, hoisin sauce and fresh herbs like mint, cilantro, lemongrass and basil. If you'd like to savor several of these intensely flavorful elements on your trip to Hanoi, order a bowl of beef pho with a side of fried spring rolls. The pho's aromatic broth and gently braised meat pairs perfectly with the crunchy rice skin of the rolls, making this an unbeatable combination. You'll find a superb version of it available at Quán Ăn Ngon. For a tasty lunch on the go, grab a duck pâté and egg sandwich from one of the many bánh mì vendors in Hanoi's Old Quarter.

Seoul

If you're planning a trip to the capitol city of South Korea, it's virtually guaranteed that you're already well acquainted with ingredients like soy sauce, garlic and sesame oil. Gochujang, on the other hand, might not be in your daily food repertoire just yet, but it will be after your visit. A zingy red chili paste made with chili powder, glutinous rice and fermented soybeans — among other things — gochujang's sweet and spicy flavor makes it an excellent condiment to use when you order an enticing combination of barbecued meats that are cooked directly at your table in restaurants throughout Seoul. The second dish that you have to try while traveling in Korea is bibimbap. Served in a heaping bowl, bibimbap typically consists of rice topped with local veggies and loaded with bits of egg and meat slices. Each establishment puts their own unique spin on it, and the bibimbap served at Jeonju Jungang Hoekwan is among the tastiest.

Singapore

When you find yourself hungry in Singapore, scan the nearest menu and ask for a bowl of laksa and an invigorating seafood dish called chili and garlic crab. Laksa is a comforting noodle soup that's frequently served with chicken, shrimp or fish. Depending on your preference, the base of the soup can be made with either rich curry coconut milk or sour tamarind broth. Laksa occasionally comes with rice rather than noodles, but either way you can't go wrong. If you're averse to intensely hot spices, don't let the name of this dish dissuade you. The tomato-based sauce helps cut down on the heat of the chilies, making this a surprisingly mild treat rather than a spicy one.

Shanghai

When eating in Shanghai, always keep in mind the four S's: soup dumpling and sweet & sour spareribs. Xiaolongbao — or soup dumplings — are adorable steamed buns that fit perfectly in your mouth and pop with incredibly flavorful broth when you bite down on them. Keep plenty of napkins handy though because they have a tendency to be a bit messy. Save room for other dumplings found throughout the city filled with pork, shrimp, minced crab, veggies or any number of other items. Sweet and sour spareribs with black bean vinegar sauce — a Shanghai specialty — are another wonderful dish to try while exploring the restaurants across China's central coast. When braised to perfection, there's simply nothing better on the menu.

Getting there

Regardless of where you decide to eat in Asia, you can plan your fantastic food tour by visiting united.com, or by using the handy United app to book your tickets.

The best National Parks to visit all year round

By Bob Cooper

National parks can be a refuge from the noise and hectic pace of everyday urban and suburban life — America's special places in nature. But during the summer peak season, they can be as busy as cities. Smart travelers visit between November and March when most parks are less crowded and accommodation choices are discounted. These national parks are especially worthwhile to visit and they're all close enough to major airports to make a three-day weekend getaway possible.

Yosemite, California

Fall and winter visitors to Yosemite National Park are treated to autumn leaves in the fall, snow-capped granite landmarks in the winter and replenished waterfalls in the spring. Tent camping can be cold, but hotel rooms in and around Yosemite Valley are widely available and Yosemite's historic lodge, The Majestic Yosemite Hotel (formerly Ahwahnee), hosts two big events in November and December: the Grand Grape Celebration and the Bracebridge Dinner (a recreation of Christmas in Olde England). Airport: Fresno Yosemite International Airport.

Everglades, Florida

Many summer vacationers are among the one million annual visitors to Everglades National Park, but the best time to come is in late-autumn or winter. Southern Florida's temperatures are milder, it's far less humid, hurricane season is over and summer flooding of the prairies has receded — letting you see more fish and reptiles. You can also see more birds in the winter via airboat tours through the Everglades, America's largest tropical wilderness. Not to mention this “river of grass" is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site, International Biosphere Reserve and a wetland of International Importance. Airport: Miami International Airport.

Mammoth Cave, Kentucky

Another world lives beneath Kentucky in the world's largest network of caves known as Mammoth Cave National Park. You will walk beneath massive crystallized formations inside the caverns and may spot one of the eight species of bats that thrive in this environment. The caves are about 54 degrees inside year-round, as if regulated by a thermostat, so they are protected from the hot humid summers and freezing winter nights above them, making them a perfect place to visit any time of the year. Visitors to this southern Kentucky park will also benefit from this climatic predictability while taking any of eight cave tours. While cave tours should be at the top of your list of things to do here, this park also offers hiking, camping, horseback riding, kayaking and more. Airport: Louisville International Airport.

Haleakala, Hawaii

Your visit to Haleakala National Park may include a number of experiences, but witnessing the sunrise or sunsets are a must. Many visitors wake up early to drive to the Summit Visitor Center to view one of the best sunrises. But make sure to plan accordingly because the National Park Service now requires a reservation for vehicles to view the sunrise from the Summit District. Other activities on the 10,023-foot mountain include hiking one of the nine trails, guided horseback rides and bike rentals post-hike to coast most of the way down. An added bonus: Humpback whale watching season stretches from December to March in Maui. Airport: Kahului Airport.

Saguaro, Arizona

Saguaro, a type of giant cacti, serve many functions for desert wildlife — but they don't cast much shade. That's why winter is the best time to hike among them where they populate hillsides by the thousands in Saguaro National Park. The park is split in two, straddling the western and eastern boundaries of Tucson, with 165 miles of hiking trails. The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, a museum, zoo and botanical garden, is a must-see attraction on the edge of Saguaro NP West. Airport: Tucson International Airport.

Joshua Tree, California

The namesake of Joshua Tree National Park is an odd-looking tree that fits in well with the weirdly wonderful rock formations adored by photographers in this high desert park. Located between Palm Springs and the L.A. area, the park encompasses two major deserts and a mountain range, offering a profoundly contrasting appearance due to the two varying ecosystems. This park can be explored by car or by foot on one of the 27 hiking trails. A bonus to visiting in the winter is the desert wildflower blooms between February and April. Airport: Palm Springs International Airport.

Biscayne, Florida

Famous lighthouse at Key Biscayne, Miami

Most of Biscayne National Park is on water, not land, so the best way to see its coral reefs (among the world's largest) and the abundance of marine life (highlighted by manatees and sea turtles) is by renting a boat or taking a boat tour. Several marinas are found at the park's edges where you can do just that, as well as rent snorkeling or diving equipment for a closer look underwater, where you'll discover diverse and colorful aquatic life and multiple shipwrecks. Kayaking and fishing in Miami-Dade County are also popular. Airport: Miami International Airport.

If you go

United Airlines flies to airports within a two-hour drive of all of these national parks. MileagePlus® Rewards can help pay for your accommodations. Go to united.com or use the United app to plan your national park getaway.

Eating through Asia, Excursionist Perk style

By The Hub team

The best part about travel, according to Marc Marrone?

"Being able to taste and try the different cuisines," Marrone says, "because even if you don't speak the language of whatever country or culture you happen to be in, you can express a lot via food."
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Spoken like a true, world class chef. Marrone, the Corporate Executive Chef for TAO Group Las Vegas, Hollywood and Singapore, recently got to immerse himself in Southeast Asian culture – and cuisine – on a week-long foodie dream come true of a trip, thanks to United's new San Francisco-Singapore route.

Marrone experienced just how spectacularly grand and modern Singapore is – the towering Marina Bay Sands Hotel, the luminescent stalks of Supertree Grove and the curved roof of the Esplanade Concert Hall all amazed him. And few cities interweave modernity and greenery quite like Singapore, a fact he had great appreciation for. Look no further than the Gardens by the Bay, a 250-acre nature park featuring intricately designed, flora-infused structures.

But beneath all of those stop-and-stare attractions lied what resonated most with Marrone: the food. From hawker stalls and wet (food) markets to Michelin-starred fine dining establishments, Singapore boasts meal options that cater to every mood.

Sharing in those food experiences with others who hadn't yet been to Singapore was his favorite part.

"You know, to see someone's face when they get to try something for the first time --that you've already had -- is an incredible experience, to be able to share that with somebody," Marrone says. "But then on top of that, experiencing some things on my own for the first time with everybody was really a crazy and amazing experience. We got to eat some amazing food and got to try some amazing things, and see some really cool parts of the city."

Additionally, Singapore is a great launching pad to the rest of Southeast Asia — as Marrone experienced, thanks to United's Excursionist Perk. Who wouldn't want two trips for the price of one?

The Excursionist Perk is meant to give a free one-way segment to travelers on round-trip award itineraries between two different regions, as defined by the United award chart. By invoking the Excursionist Perk, travelers can get a segment for no additional miles within the region they're visiting as long as it's a different region than where they're starting. All they have to pay are the taxed and fees associated with the new segment. For example, Newark-London-Vienna-Newark would cost the same amount of miles as Newark-London-Newark.

Marrone cooking on the streets of Vietnam

Marrone getting around via moped in Vietnam


Marrone used the Excursionist Perk to add a day in Vietnam to his itinerary on his Singapore trip.

"I got to cook on the side of the street and eat some of the best food right off the grill on the sidewalk," Marrone said. "Little did I know how much of an impact the 26 hours we spent there would have on me."

To Marrone, Vietnam stands out more than any other destination he's been to.

"From the minute we got off the plane to then we got back on the plane, it was a full immersive cultural experience between all the different foods, we got to experience how we travel around Vietnam, and really got to spend a true day in the life of what it's like to be in Vietnam."

5 tips & tricks we learned

  • Eat at a hawker center more than once They're everywhere and Singapore is home to the cheapest Michelin-starred meal in the world (Liao Fan Hong Kong Soya Sauce Chicken Rice & Noodle).
  • The airport is a destination in and of itself The world's best airport for many years complete with a butterfly garden and rooftop pool. English is an official language of the country so no language barriers and it's a hub for Asian destinations so you're only a few hours from Bangkok, Ho Chi Minh City and many more.
  • Download Grab Singapore doesn't have Uber or Lyft so the Grab app is a must-have for getting around town.
  • There's more than one infinity pool in town While the iconic Marina Bay Sands has its very popular roof top infinity pool, you can also find one at the JW Marriott Hotel Singapore South.
  • You can still hit the beach in Singapore Singapore is home to Sentosa, a man-made island that features a beach that is over a mile long. You can also hit one of the two golf courses, 14 hotels and even Resorts World Sentosa, featuring the theme park Universal Studios Singapore and a casino.
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