Three Perfect Days: Finger Lakes - United Hub
Hemispheres

Three Perfect Days: Finger Lakes

By The Hub team , April 09, 2014

Story by Rohan Kamicheril | Photography by Ben Rosenzweig | Hemispheres, April 2014

Seen from above, the Finger Lakes look like claw marks on the landscape. The 11 glacial trenches occupy a relatively narrow corridor of central upstate New York, yet they have a far wider significance. The Iroquois believed they were of divine provenance. Farmers and loggers flocked to the area for the fertile land around their shores. The lakes are central to the region's identity and its economy. Everything here leads back to water.

The forces that shaped the Finger Lakes also endowed the region with a fierce natural beauty. The surrounding hills are split into innumerable gorges, with hidden waterfalls, secret swimming holes and enough scenic outcrops to keep a landscape painter occupied for a lifetime. The lakes themselves, some of the deepest in the U.S., are enchanting—made more so, perhaps, by the lush vineyards that surround them.

And there are plenty of rewards away from the water's edge, too. In addition to top-notch wineries, orchards dot the countryside, whose meadows burst with cattails, goldenrod and chicory. In summertime farmers markets abound, reflecting a resurgent interest in the bounty of the region. You can't throw a peach pit without hitting a local cheese maker, bread maker or small-batch seed-oil producer.

The region is also home to Cornell University, Ithaca College and Hobart and William Smith Colleges, a fact that lends its towns a youthful energy and ensures that the area's cultural attractions are as varied and impressive as its landscapes. It is this variety that makes the Finger Lakes such a wonderful place to be. There's always a sense that you're discovering something new, even if that something has been two million years in the making.

DAY ONE | You wake up late, despite the sun pouring through your balcony doors at La Tourelle Resort, a restored farmhouse property surrounded by sprawling lawns and orchards on a hill overlooking Ithaca. From the cumulous depths of your bed, you have a clear view of the high, wooded walls of Buttermilk Falls State Park, where you'll be spending your morning. First, you head downstairs to The Bistro for a breakfast of oatmeal-crusted French toast and two devilishly decadent Danishes—fortification for the hike you have planned.

The deep gorge trails of Buttermilk Falls are a few minutes' walk away, along paths winding past cataracts and slender, idling pools. Fractured shale walls beetle overhead, thick with gangly opportunistic weeds. You reach a deep, clear pool at the base of Buttermilk Falls and take the plunge. Reclining in the bracingly chilly water, you squint at the fierce sun overhead, the water thundering in your ears.

Fly fishing with Mark MoskalFly fishing with Mark Moskal

After drying off in the sun, you walk over to Moosewood, the Ithaca restaurant famous for its local, vegetarian fare. In the airy blonde-wood dining room, you savor Asian rice salad and sun-gold squash soup and watch the boho regulars and Cornell academics chow down on their veggie burgers and '70s-style composed salads.

As a reward for your virtuous lunch, you order a brownie with a scoop of vanilla from the nearby Dennis' Homemade Ice Cream. Feeling a little hiked out, you take a short drive to Newman Overlook in the middle of the Cornell Plantations, the university's vast natural preserve, which houses an arboretum and a botanical garden. You enjoy the park from above, gazing out over the tufted treetop canopy while digging into your dessert.

Feeling jauntier now, you head back into town to visit the Johnson Museum of Art, home to one of the best university art collections in the U.S. You enter the hulking I.M. Pei building and head to the top floor, which has fine views of shimmering Cayuga Lake. From here, you work your way down through the sunny galleries, pausing before Giacometti's bronze “Walking Man II." “Look," says an old man to his wife, gesturing at the stooped, attenuated figure, “it's us earlier today!"

As the afternoon wears on, you head over to the Ithaca Beer Company, a popular brewery across the road from Buttermilk Falls State Park. You order a cold and bracingly bitter Excelsior! White Gold in the bustling tap room, then head outside to sit in a lawn chair and enjoy a more tranquil drinking experience. On surrounding lawns, fires burn in clay pits. Children run about, scrambling after the blinking fireflies. In a nearby field, head-high corn stalks rustle in the breeze.

The botanical gardens at Cornell PlantationsThe botanical gardens at Cornell Plantations

It's hard to drag yourself away from all this, but dinner awaits at Hazelnut Kitchen in nearby Trumansburg. With its handsome vintage detail, the restaurant feels like a gleaming hand-tooled diorama. You sit at a bar near the galley kitchen and get down to the business of ordering. Your peach and arugula salad is ripe and peppery. The house-made pan-fried gnocchi, with fresh corn and a trembling poached egg, are tender, crisp and sweet. You take a spoon to your crème brûlée and it cracks like a hammer on plate glass. You can't possibly eat more than two bites, you think, then polish it off handily.

It's still on the early side when you get back to Ithaca, so you stop by Lot 10, a bar known for its excellent mixed drinks and eclectic roster of musical acts. To start, you order a Negroni (Beefeater gin, Campari, vermouth), which the bartender executes perfectly. As you swallow the last of your drink, Matt Riis, the bar's garrulous owner, convinces you to try a Pickleback—one part Jameson, one part pickle juice. “Sweet & Sour Dill or Spicy Asian?" he asks, already pouring out shots. You wish your college town had had a place like this.

It's getting late, and you're feeling a little, um, pickled, but you decide on one more stop before heading back to the hotel. So it is that, a few minutes later, you find yourself back at the Johnson Museum, standing on a lawn and gazing up at a balcony, upon which you can see Leo Villareal's “Cosmos" installation, its constellation of lights careening across the ceiling of the Mallin Sculpture Court, splitting and regrouping, a sea of nautiloids and fractals blooming and fading into the night sky.

Mixing it up at Lot 10Mixing it up at Lot 10

DAY TWO | You wake up early and head to the open-air Ithaca Farmers Market, where you forage for breakfast among heaps of produce—nectarines like summer moons, garnet-colored beets, tangled mounds of peppers and beans. “Eat one, it won't kill you!" a farmer yells as you eyeball a bin of cherries. You pop two in your mouth and buy a pound to snack on. Next, you wolf down a num unsom ang, a sweet Cambodian rice cake, then a blueberry scone at the aptly named Fat Boy Bakery. Oh, and a quick hunk of poppy-seed cake from Veronika's Pastries. You were hungry.

Your next stop, a few miles up the west bank of Cayuga, is the sleek, angular Museum of the Earth, carved into a hillside above the lake. A 200-million-year-old Coelophysis dinosaur guards the entrance, beyond which, hanging from the ceiling, is the skeleton of a right whale. In one gallery you find a display recounting the glacial history of the area's imponderably deep lakes. In another, you encounter (no kidding) the official fossil of the state of New York: an immense sea scorpion, now thankfully extinct.

You leave the museum in a predatory mood, so you stop by Lively Run, a nearby goat cheese maker. The goats, listlessly chewing their hay in the barn, are too peaceable to pique your appetite, so you head into the tasting room, where you sample a briny Balkan-style feta and a creamy Cayuga blue before you continue on your way, primed for lunch.

Finger Lakes DistillingFinger Lakes Distilling

After a short drive west, the broad expanse of Seneca Lake comes into view. You stop at the Stonecat in Hector, a clapboard bistro overlooking the water, and claim a table under a shaggy willow tree. You dig into a pub plate of maple-juniper sausage, accompanied by a wild smear of peach-apricot chutney and a buttery wedge of Keeley's Across the Pond cheese, enjoying the dappled shade and gazing idly at the distant boats.

Your next stop is Watkins Glen, an idyllic hamlet at the lake's southern end, but first you duck into Finger Lakes Distilling in Burdett for a digestivo. Beyond the glass-walled tasting room you can see the Willy Wonka–style works, the gurgling vats and copper stills producing a clear trickle of high-proof spirits. You toss back a shot of the soon-to-be-released wheated bourbon, which disappears in a luxurious vapor. You buy a bottle and wish you had room for more.

You arrive in Watkins Glen and check into the Harbor Hotel, which sits astride the town's busy marina and looks out over Seneca Lake. The hotel's handsome fieldstone lobby is lined with Gilded Age photographs of the town. Your balcony has a wide view over the marina, where you spot your ride for the afternoon: the schooner True Love, rocking imperially in her slip. The boat's gleaming woodwork and clean lines seem unchanged from its star turn with Grace Kelly in High Society.

After a brief rest, you stroll down to the dock to meet Lawrence Hacker, the boat's captain. Lawrence looks the part—tan and tall and squinting against the sun. The rushing wind swells the sails, and the cobalt water parts in surging waves, sending a fine spray into the air. The boat scuds northward, passing rolling vineyards, stands of forest cover, rows of lakeside cabins. By the time you reach Hector Falls, the sun has begun to descend, and the towering face of the falls is bathed in golden light. Later, as the boat makes its way back to dock, its sails snapping in the wind, you think that you could get used to this.

The animal responsible for the goat cheese at Lively RunThe animal responsible for the goat cheese at Lively Run

There's time for a sundowner before dinner, so you head for the Tavern Room at Seneca Lodge, a nearby cluster of A-frames and cabins. The bar's timber walls are hung with deer heads. You put a coin in the nickelodeon and order a mug of the house pale ale. Jack, one of the owners, regales you with snippets of local lore, at one point producing a finger, which, the story goes, once belonged to a regular. He lost it in a workshop accident, Jack says, so he had it bronzed and gave it to the bar as a gift. After this, he moves on to his favorite topic: birdwatching. “Barn swallows, they're all barn swallows," one of the regulars shouts across the bar, to loud laughter. You'd love to hear more, but your growling stomach has other ideas.

The bistro at Red Newt Cellars in Hector is serving a number of its older vintages tonight. You start with a heady 2008 Curry Creek Gewürtztraminer and a board of pickles and cheeses and meats. Your strip steak is both beautifully charred and blushingly rare. The accompanying freekeh and smoked shiitakes are grown-next-door fresh. Dessert is a silken chocolate chèvre cheesecake and a glass of aromatic, port-style Hellbender. This seems like a fitting end to the day.

The moon is high and bright as you drive back to Watkins Glen. The landscape, so green by day, is black, puddled with silver. Back at your hotel, you leave the balcony door open and drift off to the sound of the wind murmuring across the lake.

A waterfall on the Cornell CampusA waterfall on the Cornell Campus

DAY THREE | You're up with the birds today—or with the worms, because the plan is to spend the morning beefing up your outdoorsy credentials with a fly-fishing lesson. First, you grab a cup of coffee from the lobby and sip it on the hotel's outdoor patio, watching the swaying masts in the marina.

Soon, you're standing on the bank of Catharine Creek with Mark Moskal, a guide from local outfit Summit to Stream, trying unsuccessfully to tie a lure to your line. “This is a brown woolly bugger," he says, tying up a feathery fly. “This will pretty much catch fish all year." You practice your casting, successfully hooking some staghorn sumac and a low elm. “It's not a day of fly-fishing unless you snag at least one tree," Mark offers gamely. By the end of the session, you're stripping the fly-line along the running water like a pro—albeit one who fails to catch a single fish.

Next, you have another macho activity lined up at the Watkins Glen International racetrack, a few miles outside the town center, which allows drivers to test their mettle on its banked oval. Instead of Firebirds and muscle trucks, you arrive to find an orderly line of VW buses at the start line, driven by a group of Volkswagen aficionados who've come to take a tour of the course. “The hippies have landed!" shouts a wiry woman holding a clipboard, and then you're off, whizzing around the track in your rental, occasionally glimpsing the tootling Technicolor vans shuddering around a bend. You watch them dawdle over the checkered line and head outside for a different kind of drive.

Meat and cheese platter at Dano'sMeat and cheese platter at Dano's

You've decided to take a short and scenic road trip up the west side of Seneca Lake to the college town of Geneva. You stop along the way at the Windmill Farm & Craft Market, named for the full-size windmill twirling outside. Having chickened out of buying a Davy Crockett hat, you stop at a stall overseen by an ornery moustachioed man in a leather vest, from whom you purchase a lucky rabbit's foot. As you pay for the foot, you consider saying “Not so lucky for the rabbit!" but the man's expression persuades you to keep quiet.

You stop for lunch at the Red Dove Tavern, a gastropub in downtown Geneva, where you belly up to the bar and a heap of crisp fried chickpeas. The PEI oysters are shockingly good—a cool, briny jolt to your taste buds. You compliment co-owner Rune Hilt on the oysters. “I love my fryer as much as the next guy," he says with a shrug, “but you've got to just let some things be." You agree, and order another half dozen.

Back at the southern tip of Seneca, you set out on a late-afternoon hike through Watkins Glen State Park. The forest trails lead you through a kind of fairy-tale landscape, over stone bridges and behind waterfalls, snaking upward beneath glowing leaves. On the way down, you walk a narrow ridge, the less traveled route that skirts the gorge, and come across Greenwood Cemetery. You wander the grassy cliffside grounds for a while, contemplating the weatherworn 19th-century gravestones and grand mausoleums. Then the shadows lengthen and you resume your descent into town.

Fairy-tale landscapes at Watkins Glen State ParkFairy-tale landscapes at Watkins Glen State Park

From here you head for Lodi, 20 miles north of Watkins Glen, on the east side of the lake, and take a porch table at Dano's, a Viennese-style restaurant. Soon, the chef-owner (Dano, naturally) ambles by to tell you he's made some cheese from a small batch of sheep's milk he just received. “They have such small teats," he says, lamenting the paucity of milk a sheep gives. “You're lucky if you get a quarter-cup a day." He disappears into the kitchen and comes back with a bowl of Slovakian bryndzové halušky, a creamy mound of cheese-slicked spaetzle topped with caramelized onions and bacon. He also delivers a plate of sausage, unbidden, along with the observation, “I don't smoke cigarettes, so I have to smoke meat instead."

You take a long draft from your mug of local wine and a forkful of spaetzle and look out at a nearby stand of quince and apricot trees, and the glimmering lake beyond. A few waiters and diners have come outside to watch the sun go down. Its last rays have brought the shore into blazing relief—every fold and plot of land is lit bright, every hidden crevice momentarily revealed.

The teat thing is now the primary piece of sheep-related trivia in New York City–based writer Rohan Kamicheril's arsenal.


This article was written by Rohan Kamicheril from Rhapsody Magazine and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Taking action to make a global impact

By The Hub team , January 17, 2020

Following the devastating wildfires in Australia and powerful earthquakes that shook Puerto Rico last week, we're taking action to make a global impact through our international partnerships as well as nonprofit organizations Afya Foundation and ADRA (Adventist Development and Relief Agency).

Helping Puerto Rico recover from earthquakes

Last week, Puerto Rico was hit with a 5.2 magnitude earthquake, following a 6.4 magnitude earthquake it experienced just days before. The island has been experiencing hundreds of smaller quakes during the past few weeks.

These earthquakes destroyed crucial infrastructure and left 4,000 people sleeping outside or in shelters after losing their homes. We've donated $50,000 to our partner charity organization Airlink and through them, we've helped transport disaster relief experts and medical supplies for residents, as well as tents and blankets for those who have lost their homes. Funding will go towards organizations within Airlink's partner network, which includes Habitat for Humanity, Mercy Corps and Americares, to help with relief efforts and long-term recovery.

Australian wildfire relief efforts

Our efforts to help Australia have inspired others to make their own positive impact. In addition to teaming up with Ellen DeGeneres to donate $250,000 and launching a fundraising campaign with GlobalGiving to benefit those impacted by the devastating wildfires in the country known for its open spaces and wildlife, our cargo team is helping to send more than 600 pounds of medical supplies to treat injured animals in the region.

Helping us send these supplies is the Afya Foundation, a New York-based nonprofit that seeks to improve global health by collecting surplus medical supplies and delivering them to parts of the world where they are most needed. Through Airlink, the Afya Foundation will send more than $18,000 worth of materials that will be used to treat animals injured in the Australian fires.

These medical supplies will fly to MEL (Melbourne) and delivered to The Rescue Collective. This Australian organization is currently focused on treating the massive population of wildlife, such as koalas, kangaroos, and birds, that have had their habitats destroyed by the recent wildfires. The supplies being sent include wound dressings, gloves, catheters, syringes and other items that are unused but would otherwise be disposed of.

By working together, we can continue to make a global impact and help those affected by natural disasters to rebuild and restore their lives


Help us (and Ellen DeGeneres) support wildfire relief efforts in Australia

By The Hub team , January 08, 2020

Australia needs our help as wildfires continue to devastate the continent that's beloved by locals and travelers alike. In times like these, the world gets a little smaller and we all have a responsibility to do what we can.

On Monday, The Ellen DeGeneres Show announced a campaign to raise $5 million to aid in relief efforts. When we heard about Ellen's effort, we immediately reached out to see how we could help.

Today, we're committing $250,000 toward Ellen's campaign so we can offer support now and help with rebuilding. For more on The Ellen DeGeneres Show efforts and to donate yourself, you can visit www.gofundme.com/f/ellenaustraliafund

We're also matching donations made to the Australian Wildfire Relief Fund, created by GlobalGiving's Disaster Recovery Network. This fund will support immediate relief efforts for people impacted by the fires in the form of emergency supplies like food, water and medicine. Funds will also go toward long-term recovery assistance, helping residents recover and rebuild. United will match up to $50,000 USD in donations, and MileagePlus® members who donate $50 or more will receive up to 1,000 award miles from United. Donate to GlobalGiving.

Please note: Donations made toward GlobalGiving's fund are only eligible for the MileagePlus miles match.

In addition to helping with fundraising, we're staying in touch with our employees and customers in Australia. Together, we'll help keep Australia a beautiful place to live and visit in the years to come.

20 Reasons to Travel in 2020

By Hemispheres Magazine , January 01, 2020


20. Spot Giant Pandas in China

In 2016, giant pandas were removed from the endangered species list, and China would like to keep it that way. This year, the country plans to consolidate the creatures' known habitats into one unified national park system spanning nearly 10,500 square miles across Sichuan, Gansu, and Shaanxi provinces—about the size, in total, of Massachusetts. —Nicholas DeRenzo


19. Follow in James Bond's Footsteps in Jamaica

Photo: Design Pics/Carson Ganci/Getty Images

When No Time to Die hits theaters on April 8, it marks a number of returns for the James Bond franchise. The 25th chapter in the Bond saga is the first to come out since 2015's Spectre; it's Daniel Craig's fifth go-round as 007, after rumors the actor was set to move on; and it's the first time the series has filmed in Jamaica since 1973's Live and Let Die. The Caribbean island has always had a special place in Bond lore: It was the location of one of creator Ian Fleming's homes, GoldenEye (which is now a resort), and the setting for the first 007 movie, 1962's Dr. No. Looking to live like a super-spy? You don't need a license to kill—just a ride to Port Antonio, where you can check out filming locations such as San San Beach and colonial West Street. Remember to keep your tux pressed and your Aston Martin on the left side of the road. —Justin Goldman


18. See the Future of Architecture in Venice

Every other year, Venice hosts the art world's best and brightest during its celebrated Biennale. But the party doesn't stop during off years, when the Architecture Biennale takes place. This year, curator Hashim Sarkis, the dean of MIT's School of Architecture and Planning, has tasked participants with finding design solutions for political divides and economic inequality; the result, on display from May to November, is the intriguing show How Will We Live Together? —Nicholas DeRenzo

17. Celebrate Beethoven's 250th Birthday in Bonn

Photo: Universal History Archive/Getty Images
Catch a Beethoven concerto in Bonn, Germany, to celebrate the hometown hero's big 2-5-0.

16. Eat Your Way Through Slovenia

When Ana Roš of Hiša Franko was named the World's Best Female Chef in 2017, food lovers began to wonder: Do we need to pay attention to Slovenia? The answer, it turns out, is definitely yes. This March, the tiny Balkan nation about two hours east of Venice gets its own Michelin Guide. —Nicholas DeRenzo

15. Star- (and Sun-) Gaze in Patagonia

Photo: blickwinkel/Alamy

Come December 13 and 14, there will be no better spot for sky-watchers than northern Patagonia, which welcomes both the peak of the Geminid meteor shower and a total solar eclipse within 24 hours. —Nicholas DeRenzo

14. Explore Miami's Game-Changing New Park

About 70,000 commuters use Miami's Metrorail each day, and city planners aim to turn the unused space beneath its tracks into an exciting new public space, a 10-mile linear park aptly named The Underline. Luckily, the Magic City is in good hands: The project is being helmed by James Corner Field Operations, the geniuses behind New York's High Line. “Both projects share similarities in their overarching goals," says principal designer Isabel Castilla, “to convert a leftover infrastructural space into a public space that connects neighborhoods, generates community, and encourages urban regeneration." When finished, Miami's park will be about seven times as long as its Big Apple counterpart. The first half-mile leg, set to open this June, is the Brickell Backyard, which includes an outdoor gym, a butterfly garden, a dog park, and gaming tables that call to mind the dominoes matches you'll find nearby in Little Havana. “We envision the Underline dramatically changing the way people in Miami engage with public space," Castilla says. —Nicholas DeRenzo

Photo: philipus/Alamy

13. Kick Off the NFL in Las Vegas

Photo: Littleny/Alamy

Former Raiders owner Al Davis was famous for saying, “Just win, baby." His son, Mark Davis, the team's current owner, is more likely to be shouting “Vegas, baby!" Swingers-style, as his team becomes Sin City's first NFL franchise, the Las Vegas Raiders. After years of threats and lawsuits, the Raiders have finally left Oakland, and this summer they're landing just across the highway from the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in a 65,000-seat, $1.8 billion domed stadium that will also host the UNLV football team, the next two Pac-12 championship games, and the Las Vegas Bowl. Construction is slated to be finished July 31, just in time for the NFL preseason—and just in time to lure football fans from the sportsbooks to the grandstand. —Justin Goldman

12. Celebrate the Suffragettes in Washington D.C.

All eyes are on the ballot box this year, but the electorate would look quite different if not for the 19th Amendment, which was ratified 100 years ago this August. Many D.C. institutions, such as the National Archives Museum and the Library of Congress, are honoring the decades-long struggle for women's suffrage with exhibits. In particular, the National Museum of American History unveils Sarah J. Eddy's portrait of Susan B. Anthony this March, before putting on a 'zine-inspired show on girlhood and youth social movements this June. —Nicholas DeRenzo

11. Go for a Ride Through Mexico City

If you want to get somewhere quickly in Mexico City, try going by bicycle. During peak traffic, bikes average faster speeds than cars or public transportation—which might explain why ridership has gone up almost 50 percent since 2007. And riding on two wheels is getting safer and easier. In 2019, the city announced plans to invest $10 million (more than it had spent in the last six years combined) into the construction of about 50 miles of new paths and lanes. Now, you can cycle on a two-mile separated path along the Paseo de la Reforma, from Colonia Juárez and Roma to Chapultepec Park and Polanco. Future plans include a route along the National Canal between Coyoacán (where Frida Kahlo once lived) and Xochimilco (with its floating flower farms). “The goal is to finish the six-year [presidential] term with 600 kilometers of bike infrastructure," says Roberto Mendoza of the city's Secretariat of Mobility. Time to start pedaling. —Naomi Tomky

10. Consider the Mayflower's Legacy in Massachusetts and Abroad

Photo: Thianchai Sitthikongsak

Before they came to America in 1620, the religious separatists now known as the Pilgrims lived in England and the Netherlands. This year, the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower landing will be commemorated not only by those nations but also by a fourth: The Wampanoag, the confederation of tribes that live in New England and whose role in this world-changing event has been at best left out and at worst distorted.

“We're challenging the myths and stereotypes," says Aquinnah Wampanoag author Linda Coombs, a board member of Plymouth 400, Inc., which is planning cultural events such
as an Ancestors Walk to honor the native villages pushed aside by settlers, as well as
an indigenous history conference and powwow (plus an $11 million restoration of the replica Mayflower II).

Kerri Helme, a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag nation and cultural programs manager at Plimoth Plantation, says that “people want to hear the whole story." She notes that it's a commonly held belief that the Pilgrims were welcomed by the natives, when in fact their first encounter was violent, since the English had been stealing the Wampanoags' food.

“The Wampanoag are key players in all of this," says Charles Hackett, CEO of Mayflower 400 in the U.K. “It's a whole other aspect of this history." In England, a Mayflower trail will connect Pilgrim sites in towns such as Southampton and Plymouth, and in Leiden, the Dutch town where the Pilgrims took refuge before embarking for the New World, the ethnology museum will run an exhibit about the natives.

“The most important thing for us, as the Wampanoag people," says Paula Peters, a former Wampanoag council member, “is to be acknowledged as a vital tribe comprised of people that, in spite of everything that's happened, are still here." —Jon Marcus

9. Discover Lille's Design Scene

Photo: Mark Bassett/Alamy

Previous World Design Capitals have included major cultural hubs such as Helsinki and Seoul, so it came as a shock when Lille, France's 10th-largest city, beat Sydney for this year's title. Judges cited Lille's use of design to improve its citizens' lives; get a taste for yourself at spots like La Piscine Musée d'Art et d'Industrie, a gallery in a former Art Deco swim center. —Nicholas DeRenzo

8. See Stellar Space in Rio de Janeiro, the World Capital of Architecture

Rio de Janeiro is renowned for the beauty of its beaches and mountains, but the Cidade Maravilhosa's man-made structures are as eye-catching as its natural features. For that reason, UNESCO recently designated Rio its first World Capital of Architecture, honoring a city that boasts such landmarks as the stained glass–domed Royal Portuguese Cabinet of Reading, the fairy-tale Ilha Fiscal palace, and the uber-modern Niterói Contemporary Art Museum.

"Rio is an old city by New World standards, having been founded in the mid–16th century," says architectural photographer Andrew Prokos, who took this shot. "So the city has many layers of architectural styles, from Colonial and Rococo to Art Nouveau, Modernist, Brutalist, and contemporary." In the case of this museum, which was designed by perhaps Brazil's greatest architect, Pritzker Prize winner Oscar Niemeyer, Prokos was intrigued by how the 24-year-old building interacts with its surroundings. "The upward slope of the museum complements the slope of the Pão de Açúcar across the bay," he says, "so the two are speaking to each other from across the water." – Tom Smyth

7. Join the Avengers at Disneyland

This summer, Disney California Adventure unveils its Marvel-themed Avengers Campus, with a new Spider-Man attraction, followed later by an Ant-Man restaurant and a ride through Wakanda. If the hype surrounding last year's debut of Disney+ is any indication, Comic-Con types are going to lose their fanboy (and -girl) minds. —Nicholas DeRenzo

6. Listen to Jazz in Cape Town

Photo: Eric Nathan/Alamy

Cape Town's natural wonders draw visitors from all over the world, but there's a hidden gem beyond the mountains, beaches, and seas: music. Much as jazz was born from America's diverse peoples, Cape jazz combines the traditions and practices of the city's multiethnic population, creating genres such as goema (named after a type of hand drum) and marabi (a keyboard style that arose in the townships). Cape Town has hosted an International Jazz Festival for
20 years (the 21st edition is this March 27–28), and now UNESCO is giving the Mother City its musical due by naming it the Global Host City of International Jazz Day 2020. The theme of the event—which takes place on April 30, features an All Star Global Concert, and is the climax of Jazz Appreciation Month—is “Tracing the Roots and Routes of African Jazz." During the dark days of slavery and apartheid, music became an outlet through which repressed people could express their struggle for freedom. What better way to mark a quarter century of democracy here than with a celebration of that most free style of music? —Struan Douglas

5. Take a Walk Around England

Many hikers love walking around England—but how many can say that they've truly walked around England? When it's completed, the England Coast Path will be the longest managed seaside trail in the world, completely circumnavigating the coastline, from the fishing villages of Cornwall and the beaches of Nothumberland to the limestone arches of the Jurassic Coast and the sandy dunes of Norfolk. Much of the trail is already waymarked (the 630-mile South West Coast Path is particularly challenging and beautiful), with new legs set to open throughout the year. If you want to cross the whole thing off your bucket list, be warned that it's no walk in the park: At around 2,795 miles, the completed route is 605 miles longer than the Appalachian Trail and about the same as the distance between New York and Los Angeles. —Nicholas DeRenzo

4. Get Refreshed in the Israeli Desert

Six Senses resorts are known for restorative retreats in places like Fiji, Bali, and the Maldives. For its latest location, the wellness-minded brand is heading to a more unexpected locale: the Arava Valley, in the far south of Israel. Opening this spring, the Six Senses Shaharut will offer overnight camel camping, off-roading in the surrounding desert, and restaurants serving food grown in the resort's gardens or sourced from nearby kibbutzim. While the valley is said to be near King Solomon's copper mines, the Six Senses is sure to strike gold. —Nicholas DeRenzo

3. Say konnichiwa on July 24 at the opening ceremonies of the Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, which plays host for the first time since 1964.

The Japanese capital plays host for the first time since 1964. This year, softball and baseball will return after being absent since 2008, and four new sports—karate, sport climbing, surfing, and skateboarding—will be added to the competition for the first time. Say konnichiwa at the opening ceremonies on July 24, which will be held at renowned architect Kengo Kuma's New National Stadium. – Nicholas DeRenzo

2. Score Tickets to Euro 2020

Still feeling World Cup withdrawal? Get your “football" fix at the UEFA European Championship. From June 12 to July 12, 24 qualifying national teams will play games in stadiums from Bilbao to Baku, culminating in the semi-finals and final at London's hallowed Wembley Stadium. Will World Cup champion France bring home another trophy? Will Cristiano Ronaldo's Portugal repeat its 2016 Euro win? Will the tortured English national team finally get its first title? Or will an upstart—like Greece in 2004—shock the world? —Justin Goldman

1. Soak Up Some Culture in Galway

Photo: Ian Dagnall/Alamy

Galway has long been called “the cultural heart of Ireland," so it's no surprise that this bohemian city on the country's wild west coast was named a 2020 European Capital of Culture (along with Rijeka, Croatia). The title puts a spotlight on the city (population 80,000) and County Galway, where more than 1,900 events will take place throughout the year. Things kick off in February with a seven-night opening ceremony featuring a fiery (literally) choreographed celebration starring a cast of 2,020 singing-and-drumming locals in Eyre Square. “This is a once-in-a-generation chance for Galway," says Paul Fahy, a county native and the artistic director of the Galway International Arts Festival (July 13–26). “It's a huge pressure. There's a heightened sense of expectation from audiences, not just from here but from all over the world." Art lovers will no doubt enjoy Kari Kola's illuminating work Savage Beauty, which will wash the Connemara mountains in green light to coincide with St. Patrick's Day, or the Druid Theatre Company's countywide tour of some of the best 20th-century one-act Irish plays. Visitors would also be wise to explore the rugged beauty of Connemara on a day trip with the charismatic Mairtin Óg Lally of Lally Tours, and to eat their way across town with Galway Food Tours. But beware, says Fahy: “Galway has a reputation as a place people came to 20 years ago for a weekend and never left." —Ellen Carpenter

Read more on this article

Scroll to top