Three Perfect Days: Taipei
Hemispheres

Three Perfect Days: Taipei

By The Hub team , March 20, 2014

Story by Orion Ray-Jones | Photography by Shane McCauley | Hemispheres, March 2014

On an overcast day, clouds cling to the upper floors of Taipei 101, cloaking the soaring tower in the same watercolor fog that swirls around the nearby mountaintops. It's a fitting metaphor for a place that, despite being situated at the nexus of Chinese and Japanese civilizations, has historically been obscured behind a kind of veil.

Even now, despite its status as one of Asia's more robust economic “tigers," the capital city of Taiwan (or Ilha Formosa, “beautiful island," as it was dubbed by 16th-century Portuguese explorers) is not as frequently visited as other East Asian boomtowns. Indeed, it's common to wander through Taipei's most appealing districts and never hear a word of English, French or German.

This is not to say that Taipei is short of attractions. Exquisite Buddhist, Taoist and Confucian temples, along with Japanese colonial buildings, dot the modern cityscape. Nature lovers can retreat to nearby mountain trails, while history buffs will be dazzled by the wealth of Asian art and crafts in Taipei's many museums and antique shops. And, as the home of global food trends from pearl tea to soup dumplings, the city is a gourmand's delight.

The term “hidden gem" is overused, but in the case of Taipei it's entirely appropriate. A visit here is a process of continual, exhilarating discovery.

DAY ONE | It's no accident that until a few years ago Taipei was home to the world's tallest skyscraper. This is a place obsessed with its own skyline, and locals can spend hours gazing at the towers from the nearby mountains, or at the mountains from the city's towers. Appropriately, then, you awake to a picture window in a 30th-floor suite at the neon-emblazoned W Taipei, the city's effort to provide the last word on design hotels.

You take your time, watching the sun arc from the hip and expensive eastern district toward the old city in the west. After a breakfast of granola, fruit and espresso in the hotel's summery Kitchen Table restaurant, you head down to the lobby, pausing to puzzle over an interactive sculpture that mirrors your movement on a grid of hundreds of LEDs. From here, you take the short walk eastward to Elephant Mountain, where you intend to get the lay of the land.

Milling around in Shilin Night Market

It's a little after eight, but the red-walled Lingyun Temple at the mountain's base is already teeming with local hikers. Knowing an out-of-towner when they see one, they stop to ask where you're from, or whisk by with a breezy zao an! Many are much older than you but seem better equipped to tackle the stone stairs that climb toward the summit. You wheeze your way up, rejoining the beaming geriatrics beside a large moss-covered rock, which you scale to pose for a selfie, the pagoda-like Taipei 101 jutting up behind you.

The elevator at Taipei 101, you've been told, is the world's fastest, and you're in no mood to argue as you zoom upward to a soundtrack of spaced-out music and your own popping ears. Alighting from the disco-lift on the 89th floor, 37 disorienting seconds later, you cannot help but notice that it's gotten a little cloudy, mostly because the clouds are at eye level. Through the wisps, you can see Taipei in all its glory—the spinning Ferris wheel, the golden roofs, the lesser towers prickling their way towards the mountains. The effect is made more dramatic by the fact that this building isn't just the city's tallest; it's the tallest by a long shot.

It takes seconds to descend the skyscraper, but the wait for a lunch table at Din Tai Fung, in the basement mall, promises to be considerably longer. This spacious eatery is almost as famous for its lines as for its xiaolongbao, the soup dumplings that have earned the Taiwanese chain a Michelin star in Hong Kong and a “top-notch table" designation from The New York Times. The dumplings are a sublime combination of chewy and soupy, but it's the spicy wontons that steal the show. When Tom Cruise ate here, your waitress tells you, he was so taken with them he asked for a lesson from the chefs.

A five-minute cab ride takes you to Songshan Cultural and Creative Park, a neo-industrial complex on the grounds of an abandoned tobacco factory. Recently declared the 2016 World Design Capital, Taipei is a hotbed of bleeding-edge art and design, and the warehouses of Songshan are the place to see it. Particularly compelling is the Red Dot Design Museum, where all sorts of objects, from elephant-inspired fire extinguishers to twisted steel table lamps, are displayed in chrome-walled halls.

Visitors at Longshan Temple

Unlike some Asian capitals, where sidewalks are treated as an extra lane for scooter and bicycle traffic, Taipei is a pedestrian-friendly city. So you work up another appetite strolling along retail-heavy Zhongxiao Road, watching as the sky turns a dusky crimson and the ubiquitous neon bursts to life. As you near Zhongxiao Dunhua Station, you come across Ice Monster, the legendary shaved-ice eatery. Heck, you think, nothing wrong with a little light dessert before dinner, and head inside for an icy mango refreshment.

Taipei's shaved ice has been exported all over the world, but the city is an importer of tastes, too. The intimate eatery Flavors, where the chef and the cuisine are Swedish, is a worthy case in point. As you graze on “snapas"—an assortment of smoked and cured fish paired with flavored spirits—chef-owner Ola Ekdahl pops in and out of the oaken dining room to extol the virtues of his adopted city. “Taipei is a place you just fall in love with," he says, “and the people of Taiwan are the nicest in the world." You can't help feeling that you've stumbled into a family meal, and you leave full of aquavit and cheer, ready to tackle Taipei's spirited nightlife.

First, you'll have to find it. On a nearby street, you squint at a small neon bull's-eye, partly obscured by a hedge. You approach the sign hesitantly, opening the door to what you hope is MOD Public Bar and not someone's living room. Inside, a rowdy, good-looking crowd sips selections from a menu of more than 75 scotches and classic cocktails, mixed by an equally good-looking bar staff who, according to your newfound drinking buddy, are among the best in town. “They steal bartenders from all the fancy bars," he shouts above the din of indie rock, clinking glasses and raucous laughter.

An indeterminate amount of time later, you return to the W, only to encounter the lobby's Woobar, which is packed with grooving socialites. You're exhausted, but… hey, you're on vacation.

In the kitchen at Din Tai Fung

DAY TWO | You awake to a shard of sunlight and the after-effects of last night's fun, so it's with some effort that you pry yourself from your unfathomably comfortable bed and head out to sample a locally popular curative. “Fu Hang Dou Jiang!" your taxi driver shouts, accelerating westward, when you ask if he knows a good Taiwanese donut spot.

Located on the second floor of the other-wise unremarkable Huashan Market, the canteen your driver has recommended is known to attract lines that snake all the way around the block, filled with people eager to try the shao bing (stuffed roasted flatbread) and crullers before the gates shutter at 10 a.m. The wait is a small price to pay for a foot-long savory cruller, a spring onion omelet and hearty sesame bread, washed down with sweet, warm soy milk, all of which combine to help tame your still-boogieing belly.

On the west side of Taipei, the glitzy gives way to the holy. At the edge of Mengjia Park, near a group of monks collecting alms of rice, you stop to admire the most famous of the city's temples, the dragon-bedecked 18th-century masterpiece Longshan. You enter the courtyard, its air thick with the smoke of incense-filled cauldrons. Worshipers place offerings of fruit and flowers on long tables and whisper prayers to Bodhisattva Guanyin, or toss wooden blocks to the floor to aid in communication with the Buddha.

From here, it's a quick cab ride to the Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall, where a hushed crowd watches the hourly changing of the guard, with its synchronized spinning of bayonet-tipped rifles, overseen by a massive bronze sculpture of Chiang, the 20th-century Chinese exile who ruled Taiwan for two and a half decades. Surrounded by a gorgeous park, which is also home to the National Theater and National Concert Hall, the blue-tiled roof atop the white marble memorial rises to 250 feet, and you can't help feeling dwarfed as you descend the 89 steps, one for each year of Chiang's life.

A ceremony at Longshan Temple

Moving from culture to commerce, you walk eight blocks east to Yongkang Street. As you jostle through lines of folks waiting for deep-fried squid, beef noodles and cupcakes, you indulge in a spot of shopping. Soon, you're toting armfuls of gifts: hand-stitched slippers from the Pinmo Pure Store, a jigsaw puzzle from Pintoo, body products made from organic ginger (planted by ex-convicts recovering from drug addiction) at Ginger 800.

Succumbing to the inescapable smell of food, you stop at the southern end of Yongkang for a Taiwanese specialty served in a French brasserie. Bistro Le Pont's Gallic name and décor are belied by its table settings of wooden chopsticks and a menu dominated by goose. You order smoked goose and goose glass noodles with peanut powder and spring onion. The springy noodles have a chili kick and are topped with a smoked hard-boiled egg, possibly laid by a goose. Appetite sated, you're waved off by a Taiwanese waitress wishing you “bon voyage."

Not far away is the Flower and Jade Market, which stretches out within long buildings beneath a highway overpass. With bulging shopping bags, you stop to look at the rows of jewelry, carved animals and uncut gemstones, but are determined not to buy. You buy. Most expensively, you buy a pair of sea-green earrings—made from “real Burma jade." You drop this, and the rest of your plunder, off at the second hotel of your stay—the Shangri-La Far Eastern Plaza, whose simple sophistication serves as a nice counterpoint to the excess of the W.

For dinner, it's back to Taipei 101 Mall, where you'll be sampling modern French cooking at S.T.A.Y. This Asian outpost of three-Michelin-starred Parisian chef Yannick Alléno combines Euro sensibilities with regional flavors in dishes like foie gras with seaweed terrine and yuzu marmalade, and mushroom gnocchi fricassee in Shaoxing wine emulsion with white Alba truffle. But the grand finale is wholly French: an assortment of modern pastries paired with homemade sorbets.

The park at Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

The fusion of East and West takes on a different hue at China Pa, a red-and-black jazz lounge filled with smoke and a hint of salaciousness. You snag one of the plush couches near the stage and watch the couples whispering in the discreet balcony while a wispy chanteuse cycles through standards in English, French and Chinese. The spell is broken only by the attentions of the drippingly friendly staff, eager to ensure that your tray of snacks is never empty.

Your 1920s Shanghai fantasy at an end—not to mention your reserves of energy—you grab a handful of sesame-encrusted chilies and point a cab in the direction of the Shangri-La, where you promptly fall into a deep, contented coma.

DAY THREE | Though it is an island unto itself, Taiwan takes pride in its dual Chinese and Japanese heritages. You can see this demonstrated in the sleek, understated design of the Shangri-La Far Eastern Plaza, which employs elements of both cultures—a red lantern here, a delicate screen there—and in its renowned Chinese and Japanese restaurants.

After watching the sunrise from the rooftop hot tub, you head up to the Shilin District in Taipei's northern quarter to explore one of the world's great collections of Chinese arts and crafts. With nearly 700,000 pieces spanning 8,000 years, it's tough to do the National Palace Museum in one visit—you could spend a week in the main hall alone. Along with the Neolithic ceramics, jade sculptures and traditional calligraphy, there's an area devoted to new media, which includes a huge “animated painting"—a screen that brings a classical landscape to life via the magic of digital technology.

Fifty years of Japanese rule left Taiwan with a taste for raw seafood, so for lunch, you go for sushi at Addiction Aquatic Development. At the entrance of this popular eatery is a fish market with a score of large, open-top aquariums full of the creatures about to be served in the complex's five eating areas. You grab a seat on the third floor, then start grinding your own wasabi from a large root, which gives a kick to the beautifully fresh sashimi, raw oysters and nigiri piled before you. The restaurant boasts an enviable collection of French wines and sakes, but you opt for a ginseng–goji berry tea, which your waiter suggests for its healing powers.

Sushi prep at Addiction Aquatic Development

A short subway ride takes you to the Beitou District, a resort area notable for the kinds of bathhouses favored by the Japanese. You stop at Villa 32, known for having some of the swankiest hot springs in town, and complete a circuit of the eight indoor and outdoor baths, each a different temperature. On the way out, you pause to lay hands on a chunk of hokutolite, a white radioactive rock that an employee says is the world's second largest and can heal any number of ailments. When he produces a Geiger counter to demonstrate the rock's potency, it's time to leave.

Aglow (as it were), you head higher up Beitou's mountains to the Grand View Resort, a brand new five-star hotel designed by Taipei 101 architect C.Y. Lee. The angular property takes inspiration from the surrounding greenery, its walls and floors a mixture of cedar, bamboo and pine, along with earthy marble and Guanyin rock. After a meditative moment on your private balcony, you head down for an oolong tea on the deck, which seemingly hovers above Danfeng Mountain and the buildings in the valley below.

Time is getting on, so you take the subway a few stops to Shilin Night Market and your final gastronomic adventure. The market's many forking alleys are chock-a-block with carnival games and clothing shops blasting K-pop, but that's not what people come for. Taipei's night markets are where most of the city's big culinary trends start, and Shilin is the biggest and trendiest of the lot.

Everywhere you look, exotic foods are being fried, barbecued, skewered or scooped into plastic bags. Many stalls sell potato snacks—roasted spuds, fried spirals covered in curry, wedges boiled in syrup. You get spicy sweet-potato balls, followed by a platter of the notorious stinky tofu. By the time the fermented cubes of soybean paste are deep-fried, smeared in hot sauce, soy sauce and scallions and topped with pickled cabbage, only a hint of stink remains, and you happily gobble the street treat. Courage stoked, you head to a stand selling “frog eggs" and are quietly relieved to discover the lime drink you're given is filled with gooey rice tapioca rather than actual spawn.

On the way back to the Grand View, you resist the temptation to hit the noisy, neon-lit bars, heading instead to your rooftop deck, where a spring-fed hot tub awaits. You lean back with a glass of warm plum wine and gaze up at the sparkling sky, the mountain air swirling around you, the rustling leaves combining with the hum of distant traffic. If you crane your neck, you can see down to the flickering lights of Taipei—a once-hidden city that, happily, seems to have found itself.

Orion Ray-Jones is a writer who lives in hotels around the globe. He took a hiatus from his vegetarian diet to report this story, and has since decided that geese are a vegetable.

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This article was written by Orion Ray from Rhapsody Magazine and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

3 under the radar places to travel to in October

By Betsy Mikel

For travelers who enjoy cooler temperatures and fall festivals, these are the perfect under-the-radar destinations to check out this October.

Stuttgart city with buildings and trees

Stuttgart, Germany

Head to Stuttgart in Southern Germany to experience a combination of German culture and a passion for fast cars and innovation. Here, you'll also find the country's second largest beer festival. It's considered the ideal home base for exploring the Black Forest mountain range and its surrounding towns. Throughout the city, historic government buildings coexist with contemporary architecture with green spaces and parks galore. Germany's sixth largest city is also home to the Porsche and Mercedes-Benz headquarters, both of which have impressive automobile museums that are open to the public.

What to do

The main event attracting visitors in October is the Stuttgart Beer Festival. Second in size only to Munich's Oktoberfest, this fairground-style festival presents more activities for all ages. There are still plenty of beer tents for adults, as well as theme-park style rides for kids. Everyone will enjoy the authentic German food stalls, music and dancing.

Stuttgart is also home to two car museums, the Mercedes-Benz Museum and the Porsche Museum. You don't have to be a car buff to enjoy their contemporary architecture and elegant interiors, both of which feature impressive collections of pristine historic cars. Visit Market Hall Stuttgart in the city center to peruse booths and stalls from local farmers, restaurants, producers and artisans. Another unique Stuttgart attraction is the Wilhelma zoological-botanical garden, which houses the largest collection of exotic animal and plant species in Europe. Spend a leisurely afternoon strolling through Wilhelma's many gardens and footpaths, which were previously a king's private retreat.

Getting there

Our Star Alliance™ partner airlines offer service to Stuttgart (STR) from multiple U.S. cities, including direct flights from New York/Newark (EWR).

Landscapes of Ireland. Blarney castle, near Cork

Cork, Ireland

Jazz, food and friendly locals in Ireland's unofficial capital

Often overshadowed by Dublin, you might be surprised by everything that Ireland's second-largest city has to offer. Some even refer to Cork as the unofficial capital of Ireland. The city's smaller footprint makes it easier to navigate, and Cork's genuinely friendly locals are more than happy to rub elbows with visitors at its cozy pubs and restaurants. Cork was even recently named the world's third friendliest city by Condé Nast Traveler, and October is an especially good time to visit. Cork's long-running jazz festival brings international talent and well-known acts to the stage. Lastly, Cork is known as Ireland's food capital thanks to its many world-class restaurants and delicious local specialties.

What to do

The Guinness Cork Jazz Festival held at the end of October gets a little bigger and better every year. The music festival has been running since 1978 and welcomes famous talent and up-and-coming jazz performers alike. It kicks off with a jazz parade that winds its way through the city streets. If you're not a jazz enthusiast, The Fringe Festival runs in parallel with live theater and musical performances from other genres.

The heart of the city's lively food scene is the English Market, an 18th-century covered market that's Ireland's most famous food emporium. Shop for produce, meat and other provisions alongside Cork's chefs on the ground level, or sample traditional Irish fare at restaurants on the second floor. After you've had your fill, make your way to one of Cork's most popular and peculiar attractions — Cork City Gaol — a castle-like building that was once a 19th-century prison. Ireland's famous Blarney Castle (and home of the Blarney Stone) is also just a 20-minute drive from Cork.

Getting there

United and our Star Alliance™ partner airlines offer services to Cork (ORK) from multiple U.S. cities.

 Redwoods at Armstrong Redwoods State Park

Guerneville, California

An underrated Sonoma destination with rustic charm

Though Sonoma welcomes fewer visitors come October, wine country is a popular year-round destination. Do as the locals do and head to Guerneville for a charming wine country getaway, just a 90-minute drive from San Francisco. This rustic ex-logging town in the Russian River Valley has welcomed several new restaurants, art galleries and shops over the last few years. Spend your time visiting tasting rooms at the many nearby wineries. Stroll underneath majestic coastal redwoods in the 806-acre state park just a few minutes from town, or pop into the eclectic storefronts along Guerneville's Main Street. This casual, unpretentious town is an ideal destination for a couple or a relaxing getaway with a group of friends.

What to do

Guerneville sits in the heart of the Russian River Valley, where pinot noir and chardonnay grow plentifully in the cool climate. More than 50 wineries are within a 20-minute drive. Between established Champagne houses like Korbel to the many family-owned wineries dotting the region, you can easily spend a day or two sampling the region's wines while taking in the valley's scenic vineyards. Beer lovers can make the short trip to Russian River Brewing Company, one of California's most well-known craft breweries.

Back in town, enjoy the retro vibe strolling along Guerneville's Main Street. From antiques and used books to clothing and collectibles, you'll find an eclectic variety of shops and boutiques. The Main Street dining scene has many options, including San Francisco-inspired farm-to-table bistros and more casual, laid-back eateries with live music. To see the nearby redwood forest, head north, just a short drive to the Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve. The reserve has many self-guided trails ranging from an easy one-mile walk to a more strenuous nine-mile hike. The Russian River runs right next to Guerneville, where outdoor adventurers will enjoy fishing, kayaking or swimming.

Getting there

United offers service to San Francisco (SFO) from multiple U.S. cities. Guerneville is a quick 90-minute drive from San Francisco.

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What to do in Zurich

By The Hub team

Passion Passport is a community-based website that tells meaningful travel stories and facilitates global connections. Our team hails from across the United States and Canada and is always up for an adventure. To learn more about where we're going and what we're doing, visit our website: PassionPassport.com

On the surface, Zurich, Switzerland, is known for banking and finance — but those who dig a little deeper discover just how enchanting the city really is. If you have the opportunity to visit, check out some of our favorite spots in this charming, upscale destination.

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Enjoy the view

Known for its scenic environments and outdoor attractions, Zurich is a perfectly walkable city. The waterfront is also a great location for picnicking and sailing. To refuel after your lakeside adventures, head to one of the area's charming restaurants — we loved Seerestaurant Quai 61 and Fischers Fritz.

After you've refueled, embark on a shopping trip for Swiss goods and souvenirs in Bahnhofstrasse, a thoroughfare that connects Lake Zurich with the city's main railway station. Home to an array of boutiques and department stores, this area presents countless opportunities to soak up the surrounding views.

waterfront in Zurich

Since Bahnhofstrasse is a highly popular locale, you'll get a more intimate experience if you venture off of the main thoroughfare and explore the areas of Augustinergasse and Rennweg Street. While they are home to a number of beautiful shops, they also acted as the city's most significant streets during the Middle Ages. Today, the popular areas are filled with boutiques, but photographers will attest that the historic, pastel buildings are now the streets' biggest draw.

For a closer look at Zurich's history, visit one of the city's most famous landmarks: the Grossmünster Cathedral, a Protestant church dating back to 1100. If you climb to the top of one of the building's two towers, you'll be greeted with views of Zurich's lake and rooftops beyond.

Another one of Zurich's famed churches is St. Peterskirche, which also happens to be the oldest in the region. Built in the ninth century, St. Peterskirche is home to the largest clock face in all of Europe, measuring 28.5 feet (8.7 meters) in diameter. The tower also features five bells that date back to the late 1800s. Visitors can explore the stunning clocktower and tour the church's minimal — yet historical — interior, which features remnants of a medieval mural.

Swiss flag along stairwell in Zurch

St. Peterskirche in Zurich

Taste the traditions

No visit to Switzerland would be complete without sampling the country's sweetest delicacy — chocolate. Zurich's famous confectioner Confiserie Sprungli is a dream for visitors with a sweet tooth. With a legacy of over 175 years, the shop's popularity endures with delicious handmade desserts ranging from truffles to cakes.

Another favorite of ours is Zeughauskeller, a locale serving traditional Swiss cuisine and local beer. Built in 1487, Zeughauskeller is also historically significant, as the building was initially used to store weapons in medieval times — though in 1926, it evolved to be a welcoming social spot for hungry patrons. As an added bonus, the menu is traveler-friendly — meaning it's written in eight different languages — and includes Zurich specialities like zürcher geschnetzeltes (sliced veal in gravy) and rösti (Swiss hash browns).

Birds flying above buildings in Zurich

Bask in beauty

After taking in Zurich's stunning sights, you might want to view them from an entirely different perspective. If that's the case, consider embarking on a Limmat River Cruise. While riding a motorized boat along the Limmat River, you'll pass the quaint features of Old Town and Lake Zurich — so be sure to bring your camera along! A round-trip cruise lasts about 50 minutes and costs 4.40 CHF (roughly 4.43 USD) for adults.

Regardless of what time of year you visit, Zurich always has plenty to offer.

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Great places to enjoy a Fall weekend

By Benét J. Wilson

Just because summer is nearly over, it doesn't mean that the travel season is over. Cities across America continue their efforts to attract autumn tourists wanting to take a trip somewhere new. Here are seven cities that offer plenty of things for you to do over a weekend.

Cape Cod sand dunes

Cape Cod, Massachusetts

This region, located on a hook-shaped peninsula, is known mainly for its beaches and busy summer season. While fall is still warm enough to visit the beach, there's even more to do with less crowds and no "Cape traffic". There are plenty of fall festivals to choose from to celebrate the season. From the 6th Annual PumpkinFest to Martha's Vineyard Food and Wine Festival — there is no shortage of events. Additionally, take a free, self-guided walking tour on the 1.6 mile Kennedy Legacy Trail, which celebrates the role the family played in the history of Hyannis and Cape Cod. Or visit the Hyannis HyArts Cultural District, home to local artists, galleries, concerts, theatrical performances and classes year-round. Indulge in the bounty of the sea at restaurants like Hyannis institution Cooke's Seafood, known for its fried clam strips, or Ocean House if you want to enjoy a meal with a view.

Denver, Colorado

The Mile High City has recently become one of the hottest craft brew cities in the country. Be sure to check a few out on the Denver Beer Trail, which covers more than 100 brewpubs, breweries and taprooms. Beer lovers should plan their trip around the Great American Beer Festival that takes over Denver in September with brews from 800 breweries. Take a stroll or a shuttle bus down the 16th Street Mall and indulge in outdoor cafes, shopping and the D&F Tower, a two-thirds replica of the Campanile of St. Mark's in Venice built in 1909. Depending on the venue's schedule, you can also catch a concert at the city's famous Red Rocks Park & Amphitheatre or hike the trails around the park which is especially beautiful in the fall. Other must-see places include the Colorado Railroad Museum, Denver Union Station and Punch Bowl Social, a restaurant and entertainment venue that used to house the old Stapleton International Airport's air traffic control tower.

Sunset cruise in Key West

Key West, Florida

Florida's southernmost point — a mere 90 miles from Cuba — is known for its diving, snorkeling and beaches. And visiting during the fall means the humid summer months are over, bringing cooler ocean breezes and refreshing water temperatures making outdoor activities great options. Go on a sunset cruise, take a tour of the island on a wave runner, participate in a pub crawl or rent a moped, a scooter or a bike to explore the Keys. Sunbathe at beaches like Fort Zachary Taylor, an 87-acre state park that is home to a pre-Civil War Fort. And make sure to visit author Ernest Hemingway's home, where he lived from 1931 to 1939 and where he wrote a few classics including the novel, To Have And Have Not.

Memphis, Tennessee

The tagline for this Southern city is the Home of Blues, Soul and Rock 'n' Roll. You can hit iconic locations covering all three by visiting the Blues Hall of Fame, the Stax Museum of American Soul Music and Sun Studio, the birthplace of Rock 'N' Roll. Walk down the city's iconic Beale Street, where you can check out bars, restaurants, clubs and shops. Take a cruise on a Memphis Riverboat and indulge in a barbecue dinner at the famous Rendezvous. Cooler temperatures also mean a variety of festivals to choose from, including Gonerfest, — Goner Records' annual music festival —Mempho music festival, Memphis Pride Festival and more. And no visit to Memphis is complete without visits to the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. passed away and Elvis Presley's Graceland.

Lake Tahoe at dawn

Lake Tahoe, Nevada

Located 154 miles north of San Francisco, this region is mostly known for ski resorts like Squaw Valley, home of the 1960 Winter Olympic Games. But there are still plenty of things to do in the fall with fewer crowds and off-season specials with lower prices. For example, take a hike along the 1.9-mile Lake of the Sky Trail, ride on the M.S. Dixie II Paddlewheeler or play a round of golf at the Lake Tahoe Golf Course. But the best way to take in all that Lake Tahoe has to offer is to do the 72-mile most beautiful drive in America, where you can take a ride on the Heavenly Gondola, visit the historic Donner Memorial State Park or try your luck at the Crystal Bay Casino.

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

Shenandoah National Park is located 124 miles west of Washington, D.C. and one of the best places in the country to enjoy fall foliage along the 105-mile Skyline Drive. View the leaves changing colors and enjoy beautiful scenery by going on a hike in the park — home to 101 miles of the Appalachian Trail along the ridge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Take a guided tour through Luray Caverns, a series of large rooms with 10-feet-high ceilings, stone columns and pools. Go horseback riding or do a tour of the Blue Ridge Whisky Wine Loop, which showcases the region's wineries, a whiskey distillery, breweries and dining.

Vineyard in Napa during Autumn

Napa, California

It's a given that you'll do a wine tasting or two in this world-famous region, though keep in mind that during fall months, wineries tend to close by 5 pm so plan to start early. And even if wine tasting isn't for you, witnessing the fall foliage while driving on the Silverado Trail from Napa to Calistoga is worth it. Or indulge yourself by visiting one of Calistoga's wonderful day spas, play a round of golf at the Vintner's Golf Club in Yountville or take a sunrise hot air balloon ride. There are no shortages of delicious restaurants — the valley is home to six Michelin-starred restaurants, including Chef Thomas Keller's French Laundry. Or you can scout out the next generation of dining talent at the Culinary Institute of America's The Restaurant at CIA Copia. If you're looking for a unique wine experience, consider doing the Art in the Afternoon tour at the Robert Mondavi Winery in Oakville, which pairs a tasting with a tour of its world-class collection.

Getting there

When you've decided where to go for your Fall weekend getaway, visit united.com or us the United app, and share your story on social media with the #myunitedjourney hashtag.

We view New Jersey's success and ours inextricably linked

By Jill Kaplan , September 17, 2018

As a proud resident of the New Jersey and New York area for the past thirty years, I know firsthand how vitally important Newark Liberty International Airport is to the success of the communities and families throughout the state – the jobs it creates, the economic activity it generates and the businesses and people it connects to markets around the globe.

We are one of the top ten employers in the state, with 14,000 employees as part of the United family and are Newark Airport's largest airline, together with our Star Alliance partners, account for more than two-thirds of both total flights and passengers. It's obvious that keeping Newark competitive requires a competitive United Airlines.

That's why we've invested more in Newark Airport than any other airline, making both our service and the airport better. We've committed $2 billion in unsubsidized airport investments since 2000 and nearly $400 million over the past two years alone.

Not only are we giving back at the airport, but we are also supporting the communities we call home. This July, we announced two new partnership grants totaling $1 million for the cities of Newark and Elizabeth supporting the Community Foodbank of New Jersey and Urban League of Essex County. These grants will greatly expand opportunities in each city, helping hundreds of young people and adults on the path to meaningful carriers and economic mobility. This commitment complements our longstanding support across New Jersey, from schools to local shelters, to vital community anchors such as the Newark Museum, the Liberty Science Center and New Jersey Performing Arts Center.

We view New Jersey's success and United's as inextricably linked, which is why the negative tone that's been adopted recently has been extremely disappointing. I am determined to get us back on the right track.

Case in point: the discussion regarding our recent decision to transition some of our operations from ABM Aviation to United Ground Express (UGE) has been unfair. Let me clarify a few things.

The current contract held by ABM was up for renewal and we began a competitive bidding process in order to improve our customers' experience at Newark Airport. After our review, we determined that UGE was the right vendor to achieve this for United's passengers and in turn, our overall operation at Newark airport.

To date, we've hosted seven job fairs and received hundreds of applications, many from current talented ABM employees and, we expect our employment figures to remain where they were before the transition to UGE. These newly created jobs will be represented by IAM, one of our union partners.

As a company we believe it's appropriate for the state to determine the minimum wage and as a good corporate citizen we continue to observe and comply with all applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations. We remain committed to treating all of our employees fairly, providing them with competitive compensation and benefit packages which feature a progression wage scale, paid time off (PTO), double-time holiday pay and company subsidized health care plan for full-time employees. Under UGE, employees also receive United flight benefits, which is a notable and unique addition to our employees' overall compensation.

United is important to the region. Without United's continuing investment in the airport, not only would jobs be lost, but also it would be a major blow to the state's economy and to the New Jersey taxpayer. We pay local taxes; the Corporate Business Tax (which was increased earlier this session); and the jet fuel tax and in addition, we pay more than $400 million a year in rates, charges and fees to the Port Authority to fund operations and infrastructure development at Newark airport. All told, United pays our fair share and creates nearly $16 billion in economic output in New Jersey and we're very proud to be doing our part to drive the New Jersey economy.

The stakes are too high for this issue to be turned into a political football and subject to overheated, misleading rhetoric.

We care deeply about our employees, our customers and our state and take our responsibilities as a good corporate citizen very seriously. We're determined to remain competitive so we can continue offering the service and standards our customers and this community deserve. United is proud to call Newark home, I hope you'll support our efforts to continue investing and growing in the great state of New Jersey.

Introducing Better Boarding

By United Airlines , September 17, 2018

The feedback from customers and employees was clear: we needed to improve our boarding process. As part of our ongoing efforts to put customers at the center of everything we do, we identified boarding as an opportunity to improve the airport experience. We tested a variety of different boarding processes on thousands of flights across multiple airports. Best practices emerged from each test, and combined, they now form what we are calling "Better Boarding".

Better Boarding consists of three key improvements

Less time in line:

By reducing the number of boarding lanes, there is more space for customers to enjoy the gate areas, many of which have been completely remodeled with more comfortable seating and in some airports, the ability to have food and drinks from within the airport delivered directly to the gate area. Over the years, we have invested millions of dollars in our terminals, and now with less time spent standing in line, customers will have more time to dine, shop, relax, work or enjoy a United Club℠.

Simplified gate layout

Say goodbye to the five long lines we see today

Group 1 will board through the blue lane.

Group 2 will board through the green lane, followed by groups 3, 4, and 5.

Two groups on each side of sign indicating lanes 1 (blue) and 2 (green)

Late arriving customers in Group 1 and 2 will use the blue lane.

Customers in groups 3, 4, and 5 always use the green lane.

Better information:

We are providing customers with more information throughout the boarding process so that they feel more at ease, and more equipped with the latest information about their flight. Customers with the United app can receive a push notification once their flight starts boarding. Customers will only receive the notification if they've opted in for push notifications and have a mobile boarding pass in the app's wallet.

Enhanced communications

Be in the know about boarding

Mobile phone and smartwatch with boarding notifications

Customers will receive boarding notifications through the United app (if they've opted in for notifications).

Gate information display with boarding instructions for group 1-2 through lane 1 (blue) and group 3-4 through lane 2 (green)

Improved gate area digital signage to guide customers through boarding.

Balanced groups and better recognition:

United MileagePlus® Premier 1K® customers will now pre-board and United MileagePlus Premier Gold customers will be boarding in Group 1. For more information on our boarding groups, visit: https://www.united.com/web/en-us/content/travel/airport/boarding-process.aspx

Improved premier customer recognition

We're happy to make them happy

Premier passenger in front of boarding line

Improved premier recognition and better positioning of customers to create balanced boarding groups.

The new Better Boarding process is just one of the steps we are taking to improve the customer experience. We will continue to collect feedback from customers on ways we can further improve boarding and you may receive a post-travel survey to tell us more about your experience

Towns in the U.S. with unusual names

By Bob Cooper

You don't have to travel to Timbuktu or Dull, Scotland to check out a uniquely named place — there are plenty in the United States. It's true that you might not find much to do in Boring, Oregon, or anything peculiar about Peculiar, Missouri — and who wants to go to Hell, Michigan? But there are even more places with strange names worth seeing.

Lake Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg, Massachusetts

And you thought “supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" was a mouthful. The 45 letters in the name of this lake in Webster, Massachusetts, makes it America's longest-named place. The lake's name means, “English knifeman and Nipmuck Indians at the boundary or neutral fishing place." Hundreds of pricey homes on its shoreline can be seen during a ride aboard the Indian Princess, one of America's last authentic paddle wheel boats. For those looking to do more than laze along the shorelines, unique fishing spots and a range of water activities are popular attractions in this town. The nearest airports are Boston and Hartford/Springfield (Bradley), each a 75-minute drive away.

Wild Horses of Assateague Island Maryland

Chincoteague, Virginia

This easternmost town in Virginia, with a name derived from its Native American name, is the southern gateway to Assateague Island National Seashore, best known for its wild horses. About 150 Chincoteague ponies, which stand only four-and-a-half feet tall, roam the island where visitors also can tour Assateague Lighthouse, a candy cane-striped 1867 national landmark that stands 142 feet tall. The nearest airport to Chincoteague is Norfolk, Virginia, approximately a two-hour drive away.

Kalamazoo, Michigan

The Glenn Miller Orchestra's “(I've Got a Gal in) Kalamazoo" was the #1 hit song of 1942, putting the Michigan town on the map. How can you not like a song with lyrics like, “I liked her looks / when I carried her books / in Kalamazoo"? Even now, it's performed by the Western Michigan University marching band at football games. The college town is also known for being home to prestigious Kalamazoo College, many brewpubs, the nearby wine village of Paw Paw and the Gilmore Car Museum. United flies to Kalamazoo/Battle Creek International Airport.

Emerald Lake in the Mammoth Lakes Basin appear green.

Mammoth Lakes, California

Mammoth Lakes was named after the Mammoth Mining Company, which brought it into existence as a gold rush boomtown. It's a fitting name because it also describes the mammoth-sized Sierra Nevada mountains that surround it, including the famed granite rock faces of nearby Yosemite National Park. Mammoth Lakes has emerged as one of America's leading destinations for trout fishing, hiking, mountain biking — and most of all — snowboarding and skiing. The Mammoth Ski Museum is a big draw. United flies into Mammoth Yosemite Airport from San Francisco December through April.

Wahoo, Nebraska

It's not a tech company or an expression of joy. Wahoo is a town named after the native eastern wahoo shrub. The town of 4,500 is best known for being named “home office" of the David Letterman Wahoo Gazette Top-10 List after town boosters bribed Dave with a wall clock made of cow dung and free checkups at Wahoo Medical Center. Wahoo Creek feeds into the town's biggest attraction, Lake Wanahoo, where you can hike, kayak, fish and camp. The nearest airport is in Omaha, Nebraska, a one-hour drive away.

Zzyzx dry lake in California

Zzyzx, California

This spot in the Mojave National Preserve is last on any alphabetical list of places and not far behind on any list of Southern California hotspots (except literally in the heat of summer). Many drive past Zzyzx Road on road trips from Las Vegas to L.A., but few know what's at the end of the road or the history behind the small town. Today, the only thing you'll find there, after taking Zzyzx Road off I-15, is the California State University-run Desert Studies Center on the land of a former hot springs resort. But the hiking is a treat if you like desert-mountain solitude. The nearest airport is an 80-minute drive away in Las Vegas.

Getting there

United Airlines flies to these places or to airports within a two-hour drive. MileagePlus® Rewards can help pay for your accommodations. Go to united.com or use the United app to plan your trip,

Spending a week in Iceland

By The Hub team

Passion Passport is a community-based website that tells meaningful travel stories and facilitates global connections. Our team hails from across the United States and Canada and is always up for an adventure. To learn more about where we're going and what we're doing, visit our website: PassionPassport.com

Iceland is a place of incomparable beauty. We recently visited some of the country's most popular destinations and explored the stunning landscapes that it is most known for. If you have the opportunity to travel to this country full of otherworldly views, be sure to check out some of our favorite places.

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Visit the capital city

Reykjavík may not be a large city, but it still offers plenty to do and see. The capital's relatively small size makes it easy to visit its most notable attractions on foot or by bicycle. Architecture enthusiasts should stop by Harpa Concert Hall to marvel at the iconic glass building, while music lovers should check out the hall's events and enjoy its array of shows, such as Iceland's Symphony Orchestra performances.

For great photo opportunities and gravity defying architecture, seek out Hallgrimskirikja, the largest church in all of Iceland. Designed by Guðjón Samúelsson in 1937 and inspired by the shapes that emerge when lava cools, the church can be spotted from almost anywhere in the city. Visitors can also climb to the top of its tower for the best views of the city below — so don't forget your camera! Once you've seen this architectural beauty, explore the city center on foot. If you're looking for a place to shop, visit Laugavegur Street, Bankastræti, Skólavörðustígur, and Lækjargata.

One of the many swimming pools in the Reykjavik area.

If you want a truly Icelandic experience, visit one of the many swimming pools in the Reykjavík area. Located behind Hallgrimskirikja, Sundhöll Reykjavíkur is the country's oldest public bath. Or, take some time to relax at Iceland's famous Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa, located just 30 minutes from the capital city by car — though, if you're not looking to rent a car, you can also take a bus from Reykjavík to the spa. The locale is open year-round, and the water in the large lake is always warm and beautifully hued. Experience the seemingly magical powers of geothermal seawater at this natural spa and enjoy a mask bar, a massage, an in-water bar, and a sauna and steam room. Note: this is a popular activity, so be sure to book in advance.

Travel along the Golden Circle

If you want to road-trip around iceland, the Golden Circle is the perfect route for you. It features three of Iceland's most popular destinations: Thingvellir National Park, Geysir Hot Springs Area, and Gullfoss Waterfall. There are also many Golden Circle tours to choose from, if you prefer to sit back, relax, and enjoy the scenery without the hassle of driving.

Your first stop will likely be Thingvellir, which became a national park in 1930 and later, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Due to Thingvellir's fascinating geology and unique history, visitors are often enchanted by its proximity to tectonic plates, lava rocks, and surrounding volcanoes. Interestingly, the land was once used as a meeting place for the parliament of the Viking Age commonwealth (its name actually means "the fields of parliament"). Today, the park is also a popular draw for those interested in bird-watching, diving, snorkeling, and viewing the Northern Lights (come winter).

Thingvellir national park in Iceland

Gullfoss Waterfall in Iceland

The second stop along the route is Gullfoss Waterfall, a stunning waterfall located in an ancient valley. The two-tiered fall is beautiful during both the winter and the summer, offering cascades of ice in cold weather and an abundance of rainbows just after the spring thaw.

From here, Geysir Hot Springs Area is just a short drive away and a 50-minute trip from Thingvellir. Although the geysir is a famous hot spring, it isn't the only geyser in this geothermal area. Keep an eye out for the region's most active, Strokkur, which sprouts hot water approximately every few minutes. Have your camera ready and keep a safe distance from the boiling eruption.

Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon in Iceland

Immerse yourself in beauty

Stunning vistas are not uncommon in Iceland. It seems like everywhere you look, there are natural wonders to observe and photograph. One of Iceland's most beautiful destinations is Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon, an area filled with blue waters dotted with glistening icebergs. What's more, this particular location is also popular among those aspiring to spot the Northern Lights. If you want to get up close and personal with the frozen landscape, the lagoon hosts amphibian boat tours, which allow you to sail alongside the icebergs. You might even spot some seals leading the way. While the lagoon is nearly six hours from Iceland's capital, it's a beautiful drive, which offers roadtrippers the chance to observe a range of Icelandic scenery along the way.

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Update on Tropical Depression Florence

By United Airlines

September 17, 2018

Today, we've resumed normal operations at all impacted airport locations with the exception of Wilmington (ILM), which is expected to reopen Thursday, September 20 once power is restored.

See below for a full list of our current operations:

AirportMonday, 9/17Tuesday, 9/18
Asheville, NC (AVL)Normal operationsNormal operations
Columbia, SC (CAE)Normal operationsNormal operations
Charlottesville, VA (CHO)Normal operationsNormal operations
Charleston, SC (CHS)Normal operationsNormal operations
Charlotte, NC (CLT)Normal operationsNormal operations
Charleston, WV (CRW)Normal operationsNormal operations
Fayetteville, NC (FAY)Normal operationsNormal operations
Greensboro, NC (GSO)Normal operationsNormal operations
Greensville, SC (GSP)Normal operationsNormal operations
Wilmington, NC (ILM)No operations

No operations;
Expected to resume on
Thursday, 9/20
Myrtle Beach, SC (MYR)Normal operationsNormal operations
Norfolk, VA (ORF)Normal operationsNormal operations
Raleigh/Durham, NC (RDU)Normal operationsNormal operations
Richmond, VA (RIC)Normal operationsNormal operations
Roanoke, VA (ROA)Normal operationsNormal operations
Savannah, GA (SAV)Normal operationsNormal operations
Shenandoah Valley, VA (SHD)Normal operationsNormal operations

September 16, 2018

We continue monitoring the latest weather forecasts, airport conditions, road closures and other activities as a result of Hurricane Florence which has been downgraded to a tropical depression. We are resuming normal operations at all stations today, with the exception of Myrtle Beach (MYR), where we expect to resume service Monday and Wilmington (ILM) which is expected to reopen Tuesday. A travel waiver is in place for customers traveling to, from or through locations impacted by the storm, offering additional flexibility to change or cancel their travel plans, and waiving baggage and pet-in-cabin fees.

Our thoughts are with all those impacted by the storm. We continue to encourage customers to check their flights on united.com or the United app for the latest flight status prior to leaving for the airport.

Stay tuned for more information as the storm progresses.

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