Bogota in 9 Essential Experiences - United Hub

Bogotá in 9 essential experiences

By Nick Harper

Once considered off-limits for international tourists on account of a long-running civil war and unpredictable violence, Colombia has undergone a dramatic and dazzling reinvention in recent years. Nowhere is it more evident than in the capital Bogotá, where a sleek new airport welcomes visitors from around the globe to a city boasting beautiful colonial history with elegant shops, hip bars and high-end restaurants. For any first-time visitor, here are 9 essential experiences to create an unforgettable trip.


Plaza Bolivar in Bogota, Colombia.

1. Start at the historic heart of Bogotá

The most logical starting point for any Bogotá visit is in the city's main square, Plaza Bolívar. It's located in the very heart of the original town, La Candelaria, a neighborhood of narrow streets lined with colonial-style houses and buildings. In the center of the square stands a bronze statue of Simón Bolívar, liberator of Latin America from Spanish rule, surrounded by four of the city's architectural highlights: the almost-Parisian Palacio de Liévano (city hall), the Palacio de Justicia (supreme court), the Capitolio Nacional (houses of congress) and the neoclassical Catedral Primada.


2. Go for gold in the Museo del Oro

A lust for gold brought the Spanish to Colombia and the evidence of their taste for opulence is on display at the fascinating Museo del Oro. The most famous of Bogotá's many museums, it holds more than 55,000 pieces of gold and other precious materials laid out over three floors and a series of thematic rooms. Close by, set over two floors inside the Banco de la República's massive museum complex, the Museo Botero celebrates Colombia's most famous artist, Fernando Botero, whose sculptures and paintings celebrate beautiful plus-sized subjects.


Artisan crafts at the Mercado de las Pulgas de Usaquen.

3. Stroll through the markets

Two of Bogota's most characterful markets are Mercado de las Pulgas de Usaquen and Paloquemao. The first takes place on Sundays and is a treasure trove of artisan crafts. The second is a vast, sprawling foodie's heaven, featuring vegetables, meats, fish and fruit you've never even heard of, let alone tasted. If you're feeling brave, order the jugo de borojo y cangrejo — a fruit shake mixed with live river crabs that just might boost your virility.


4. Take a food tour

Bogotá has enjoyed a culinary explosion over recent years with cafes, restaurants and hole-in-the-wall dining options to cater to all tastes and budgets, from humble corrientazo serving up hearty set menus of ajiaco soup and corn, potatoes, yucca and meat, to high-end culinary experiences such as Criterión, Matiz and Tábula. To really taste the local flavors, sign up for a food tour and allow an expert to show you the sights and flavors of the city's neighborhoods. La Mesa offers one of the best tours.

Sim\u00f3n Bol\u00edvar Metropolitan Park

5. Explore the "Green Lungs"

At 400 hectares, Simón Bolívar Metropolitan Park offers relief in a city of more than eight million bustling people. Sitting in the very heart of the city, the park is a series of five neighboring green spaces that function as 'the lung of the city'. Explore lakes, parks, a children's museum and the Events Plaza, where international artists such as Metallica, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Aerosmith have performed (and shattered the tranquility).



Inside of Iglesia de San Francisco in Bogota, Colombia

6. Visit the church

In a city of so many places of worship, the Iglesia de San Francisco stands tall as the city's oldest surviving church. Constructed between 1557 and 1621 and standing amid the city's modern office blocks, its vast wooden doors give way to a brooding interior of dark wood, gold leaf and incense quite at odds with its 21st century surroundings. The most notable aspect is the 17th-century gilded main altarpiece, Bogotá's largest and most elaborate piece of art of its kind.


7. Experience the night life

When night falls on Bogotá, head for Gaira Café, the legendary restaurant and bar owned, and occasionally frequented, by Colombian singer Carlos Vives. Part restaurant, part classic Colombian dance hall, part musical museum, space is always at a premium. But if you can't get in, head for Zona T, where the evening stretches long into the night at bar/clubs such as La Villa and Armando Records.


Street graffiti in Bogota, Colombia.

8. Take a street art tour

Bringing color to a city packed full of impressive but undeniably grey colonial architecture, Bogotá's street art scene tells the city's more recent history through a series of vibrant murals. Join up with the Bogotá Graffiti Tour and your expert guides will walk and talk you through the most important art in the city, taking you through the streets of La Candelaria and deep into the city's urban art scene. Reserve a tour here.

9. See the city from above

For the best views and photo opportunities of Bogotá, head up Cerro de Monserrate, an Andean bluff to the east of the city. The white church that stands proudly atop this mountain is a mecca for pilgrims drawn to its altar statue of the Fallen Christ, to whom many miracles have been credited. For the non-religious, the panoramic views of the city 10,000 feet below are as strong a lure. A funicular railway and cable car will carry you up, though it's also possible to walk up via a route that starts beside the base station. If you have any breath left after walking to the top, the views will take it away.

If you go

United Airlines flies directly to this city. Visit united.com or use the United app to plan your next South America adventure.

Reflecting on Veterans Day: a message from our CEO Oscar Munoz

By Oscar Munoz, CEO, United Airlines , November 11, 2019

Right now, around the world, brave members of America's armed forces are on duty, defending our freedom and upholding our values.

When not laser-focused on the mission at hand, they're looking forward to the day when their service to our nation is fulfilled and they can reunite with their families.

They are also imagining how they can use their hard-earned skills to build an exciting, rewarding and important career when they return home.

I want them to look no further than United Airlines.

That's why we are focused on recruiting, developing and championing veterans across our company, demonstrating to our returning women and men in uniform that United is the best possible place for them to put their training, knowledge, discipline and character to the noblest use.

They've developed their knowledge and skills in some of the worst of times. We hope they will use those skills to keep United performing at our best, all of the time.

That's why we are accelerating our efforts to onboard the best and the brightest, and substantially increasing our overall recruitment numbers each year.

We recently launched a new sponsorship program to support onboarding veterans into United and a new care package program to support deployed employees. It's one more reason why United continues to rank high - and rise higher - as a top workplace for veterans. In fact, we jumped 21 spots this year on Indeed.com's list of the top U.S workplaces for veterans. This is a testament to our increased recruiting efforts, as well as our efforts to create a culture where veterans feel valued and supported.

We use the special reach and resources of our global operations to partner with outstanding organizations. This is our way of stepping up and going the extra mile for all those who've stepped forward to answer our nation's call.

We do this year-round, and the month of November is no exception; however, it is exceptional, especially as we mark Veterans Day.

As we pay tribute to all Americans who have served in uniform and carried our flag into battle throughout our history, let's also keep our thoughts with the women and men who are serving around the world, now. They belong to a generation of post-9/11 veterans who've taken part in the longest sustained period of conflict in our history.

Never has so much been asked by so many of so few.... for so long. These heroes represent every color and creed. They are drawn from across the country and many immigrated to our shores.

They then freely choose to serve in the most distant and dangerous regions of the world, to protect democracy in its moments of maximum danger.

Wherever they serve - however they serve - whether they put on a uniform each day, or serve in ways which may never be fully known, these Americans wake up each morning willing to offer the "last full measure of devotion" on our behalf.

Every time they do so, they provide a stunning rebuke to the kinds of voices around the world who doubt freedom and democracy's ability to defend itself.

Unfortunately, we know there are those who seem to not understand – or say they do not - what it is that inspires a free people to step forward, willing to lay down their lives so that their country and fellow citizens might live.

But, we – who are both the wards and stewards of the democracy which has been preserved and handed down to us by veterans throughout our history – do understand.

We know that inciting fear and hatred of others is a source of weakness, not strength. And such divisive rhetoric can never inspire solidarity or sacrifice like love for others and love of country can.

It is this quality of devotion that we most honor in our veterans - those who have served, do serve and will serve.

On behalf of a grateful family of 96,000, thank you for your service.

Humbly,

Oscar

United named a top workplace for veterans

By The Hub team , November 10, 2019

Each year around Veterans Day, Indeed, one of the world's largest job search engines, rates companies based on actual employee reviews to identify which ones offer the best opportunities and benefits for current and former U.S. military members. Our dramatic improvement in the rankings this year reflects a stronger commitment than ever before to actively recruiting, developing and nurturing veteran talent.

"We've spent a lot of time over the past 12 months looking for ways to better connect with our employees who served and attract new employees from the military ranks," said Global Catering Operations and Logistics Managing Director Ryan Melby, a U.S. Army veteran and the president of our United for Veterans business resource group.

"Our group is launching a mentorship program, for instance, where we'll assign existing employee-veterans to work with new hires who come to us from the armed forces. Having a friend and an ally like that, someone who can help you translate the skills you picked up in the military to what we do as a civilian company, is invaluable. That initiative is still in its infancy, but I'm really optimistic about what it can do for United and for our veteran population here."

Impressively, we were the only one of our industry peers to move up on the list, further evidence that we're on a good track as a company.

Mission Accomplished

By Matt Adams , November 06, 2019

The question of where David Ferrari was had haunted retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Vincent Salceto for the better part of 66 years.

Rarely did a week go by that Salceto didn't think about his old friend. Often, he relived their last moments together in a recurring nightmare. In it, it's once again 1953 and Salceto and Ferrari are patrolling a valley in what is now North Korea. Suddenly, explosions shatter the silence and flares light up the night sky.

Crouching under a barrage of bullets, Salceto, the squad's leader, drags two of his men to safety, then he sees Ferrari lying face down on the ground. He runs out to help him, but he's too late. And that's when he always wakes up.

Italian Americans from opposite coasts – Salceto from Philadelphia, Ferrari from San Francisco – the two became close, almost like brothers, after being assigned to the same unit during the Korean War. When Ferrari died, it hit Salceto hard.

"After that, I never let anyone get close to me like I did with Dave," he says. "I couldn't; I didn't want to go through that again."

When the war ended, Salceto wanted to tell Ferrari's family how brave their son and brother had been in battle. Most of all, he wanted to salute his friend at his gravesite and give him a proper farewell.

For decades, though, Salceto had no luck finding his final resting place or locating any of his relatives. Then, in June of this year, he uncovered a clue that led him to the Italian Cemetary in Colma, California, where Ferrari is buried.

Within days, Salceto, who lives in Franklinville, New Jersey, was packed and sitting aboard United Flight 731 from Philadelphia to San Francisco with his wife, Amy, and daughter, Donna Decker, on his way to Colma. For such a meaningful trip, he even wore his Army dress uniform.

That's how San Francisco-based flight attendant Noreen Baldwin spotted him as he walked down the jet bridge to get on the plane.

"I saw him and said to the other crew members, 'Oh my goodness, look at this guy,'" she says. "I knew there had to be a story."

The two struck up a conversation and Salceto told Baldwin why he was traveling. She got emotional listening to him talk and made a point of fussing over him, making sure he and his family had everything they needed.

About halfway through the flight, Baldwin had an idea. She and her fellow crew members would write messages of encouragement to Salceto and invite his fellow passengers to do the same.

"We did it discreetly," says Baldwin. "I asked the customers if they saw the man in uniform, which most had, and asked them if they wanted to write a few words for him on a cocktail napkin. A lot of people did; families did it together, parents got their kids to write something. After the first few rows, I was so choked up that I could barely talk."

When Baldwin surprised Salceto with dozens of hand-written notes, he, too, was speechless. He laid the stack on his lap and read each one. At the same time, the pilots made an announcement about the veteran over the loud speaker, after which the customers on board burst into applause.

"It seems contrived, and I hate using the word organic, but that's what it was; it just happened," Baldwin says. "Mr. Salceto was so loveable and humble, and what he was doing was so incredible, it felt like the right thing to do. And you could tell he was touched."

On June 27, Salceto finally stood before Ferrari's grave and said that long-awaited goodbye. As a trumpeter played "Taps," he unpinned a medal from his jacket and laid it reverently on the headstone.

"I had gotten a Bronze Star for my actions [the night Ferrari died] with a 'V' for valor, and that was the medal I put on Dave's grave," says Salceto, pausing to fight back tears. "I thought he was more deserving of it than I was."

For the first time in years, Salceto felt at peace. His mission was accomplished.

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