8 Best Places for Fall Foliage - United Hub

The best 8 places for fall foliage

By The Hub team

Labor Day is over and autumn is on the horizon. So once there's a chill in the air — and rather than drinking rum punch under a palm tree, you're in the mood to sip warm cider beneath a majestic golden maple — where should you go to enjoy autumn in all its glory? Here are eight islands known for their fall colors.

Mount Desert Island, Maine

Cadillac Mountain at Acadia National Park in Maine

Home to Acadia National Park, Maine's Mount Desert Island becomes a spectacular patchwork of autumn colors in early- to mid-October. Temperatures might be a bit brisk (in the 40s and 50s), but the fresh air is perfect for a hike to the summit of 1,530-foot Cadillac Mountain. Prefer to sightsee by car? Drive the 27-mile Park Loop Road to check out the beauty of Sand Beach, the views from Otter Cliff and the crystalline waters of Jordan Pond, where your can enjoy lobster rolls and chowder in the Jordan Pond House restaurant.

Honshu Island, Japan

Autumn colors surround Lake Kawaguchiko near Mount FujiAutumn colors surround Lake Kawaguchiko near Mount FujiShutterstock

Japanese red maples — need we say more? The temples of the ancient city of Kyoto on Japan's main island of Honshu are even more stunning when surrounded by the intense crimson hues of its native fall foliage. Colors tend to peak in early to mid-November and there's an array of top leaf-viewing spots from which to choose: Honen-in Temple, Ginkaku-ji Temple and Nanzen-ji Temple as well as Sento-Gosho Garden and the mountain village of Takao. Crowds swell on weekends, so plan to visit midweek.

Mackinac Island, Michigan

Peep fall leaves on Mackican from late September to late OctoberPeep fall leaves on Mackican from late September to late OctoberShutterstock

Travel back more than a century in time as you celebrate fall on this car-free Michigan island that's located where Lake Michigan meets Lake Huron and is home to the legendary Grand Hotel, built in 1887, and hundreds of horse-drawn carriages. Peak foliage occurs from late September to late October (ferries run until Oct. 31) and it's the perfect time to rent a bike and ride the 8-mile trail that circles the island to experience its many charms: Victorian mansions along East Bluff; late-blooming dahlias in the Grand Hotel's flower beds; the rocky, postcard-perfect shorelines; and the golden maples and red oaks around Fort Mackinac.

The British Isles

Stockghyll, located in England's Lake District, is lovely in the fallStockghyll, located in England's Lake District, is lovely in the fallShutterstock

Take your pick of England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales — but we especially love the fall colors in England's Lake District. Rolling hills, tidy villages and meandering back roads set the scene as native trees and plants that include oak, beech, birch and heather color the landscape with painterly shades of red, yellow, orange and purple. From Derwent Water to Windermere, there are fireplaces galore to get cozy in front of and ample pints of local craft beer to down. Foliage tends to peak in early October, but if you can't make it then, November 5 is Bonfire Night (aka Guy Fawkes Night — a four-century-old tradition), when fireworks and bonfires provide a color show of another sort.

Prince Edward Island, Canada

Fall foliage on Prince Edward IslandFall foliage on Prince Edward IslandShutterstock

Anne of Green Gables may be the fictional redheaded heroine of this island in Canada's Eastern provinces, but from mid-September to late October, fiery red maples and brilliant yellow birches are the stars. In autumn, Prince Edward Island is a haven of relaxation, offering walking, hiking and biking trails as well as a rich harvest of local fruits, vegetables and seafood. If oysters, mussels, lobster and other tasty ocean treats are your favorites, time your visit to coincide with the annual PEI International Shellfish Festival in mid-September as the leaves are just beginning to change.

San Juan Islands, Washington

Fall colors surround the lighthouse on San Juan Island in WashingtonFall colors surround the lighthouse on San Juan Island in WashingtonShutterstock

Catch a ferry from Anacortes across Puget Sound to one of these rugged Washington State islands — San Juan, Orcas and Lopez being the main three — and you'll feel instantly relaxed. And with summer crowds a distant memory, the pace is laid-back and temperatures range from the mid-60s in September to around 50 in November. Discover the region's flavors during farm tours, beer tastings and harvest dinners with special “Savor the San Juans" events throughout fall. As for the foliage, Garry oaks and big leaf maples add splashes of color to the velvety forests of firs, hemlocks and cedars.

New York, New York

The lake in Manhattan's Central Park is a prime leaf-peeping spotThe lake in Manhattan's Central Park is a prime leaf-peeping spotShutterstock

Yes, the island of Manhattan is mostly asphalt and concrete, and yet the nature-blessed oases it does have — Central Park, Riverside Park, the Cloisters — put on a pretty amazing autumnal show from mid-October to mid-November. You can jog through a “shower" of gently falling leaves on the Mall in Central Park or pose for a selfie by the Bow Bridge with its backdrop of golden branches. Riverside Park's walking trails are enveloped in a canopy of color and the medieval sculptures and gardens of Upper Manhattan's Cloisters become even more inviting. Frank Sinatra chose to record Autumn in New York for a reason.

Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia

Assateague Island's wild poniesAssateague Island's wild poniesShutterstock

Why settle for fall colors when you can see magnificent wild horses, too? Assateague Island, located on the Eastern Shore and divided equally between Maryland and Virginia, is home to both. Its coastal groundcover turns vivid yellow and deep red by late October and early November (but be careful to avoid the poison ivy!) and the 300 horses, also referred to as ponies, freely roam the island's state and national parks in small groups. You can get within a safe viewing distance (40 feet or more) several ways: wildlife cruises, kayak tours, bike rides or leisurely drives around the island. Just remember, these horses are feral and should not be approached or petted.


This article was written by Donna Heiderstadt from Islands and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Reflecting on Veterans Day: a message from our CEO Oscar Munoz

By Oscar Munoz, CEO, United Airlines , November 11, 2019

Right now, around the world, brave members of America's armed forces are on duty, defending our freedom and upholding our values.

When not laser-focused on the mission at hand, they're looking forward to the day when their service to our nation is fulfilled and they can reunite with their families.

They are also imagining how they can use their hard-earned skills to build an exciting, rewarding and important career when they return home.

I want them to look no further than United Airlines.

That's why we are focused on recruiting, developing and championing veterans across our company, demonstrating to our returning women and men in uniform that United is the best possible place for them to put their training, knowledge, discipline and character to the noblest use.

They've developed their knowledge and skills in some of the worst of times. We hope they will use those skills to keep United performing at our best, all of the time.

That's why we are accelerating our efforts to onboard the best and the brightest, and substantially increasing our overall recruitment numbers each year.

We recently launched a new sponsorship program to support onboarding veterans into United and a new care package program to support deployed employees. It's one more reason why United continues to rank high - and rise higher - as a top workplace for veterans. In fact, we jumped 21 spots this year on Indeed.com's list of the top U.S workplaces for veterans. This is a testament to our increased recruiting efforts, as well as our efforts to create a culture where veterans feel valued and supported.

We use the special reach and resources of our global operations to partner with outstanding organizations. This is our way of stepping up and going the extra mile for all those who've stepped forward to answer our nation's call.

We do this year-round, and the month of November is no exception; however, it is exceptional, especially as we mark Veterans Day.

As we pay tribute to all Americans who have served in uniform and carried our flag into battle throughout our history, let's also keep our thoughts with the women and men who are serving around the world, now. They belong to a generation of post-9/11 veterans who've taken part in the longest sustained period of conflict in our history.

Never has so much been asked by so many of so few.... for so long. These heroes represent every color and creed. They are drawn from across the country and many immigrated to our shores.

They then freely choose to serve in the most distant and dangerous regions of the world, to protect democracy in its moments of maximum danger.

Wherever they serve - however they serve - whether they put on a uniform each day, or serve in ways which may never be fully known, these Americans wake up each morning willing to offer the "last full measure of devotion" on our behalf.

Every time they do so, they provide a stunning rebuke to the kinds of voices around the world who doubt freedom and democracy's ability to defend itself.

Unfortunately, we know there are those who seem to not understand – or say they do not - what it is that inspires a free people to step forward, willing to lay down their lives so that their country and fellow citizens might live.

But, we – who are both the wards and stewards of the democracy which has been preserved and handed down to us by veterans throughout our history – do understand.

We know that inciting fear and hatred of others is a source of weakness, not strength. And such divisive rhetoric can never inspire solidarity or sacrifice like love for others and love of country can.

It is this quality of devotion that we most honor in our veterans - those who have served, do serve and will serve.

On behalf of a grateful family of 96,000, thank you for your service.

Humbly,

Oscar


United named a top workplace for veterans

By The Hub team , November 10, 2019

Each year around Veterans Day, Indeed, one of the world's largest job search engines, rates companies based on actual employee reviews to identify which ones offer the best opportunities and benefits for current and former U.S. military members. Our dramatic improvement in the rankings this year reflects a stronger commitment than ever before to actively recruiting, developing and nurturing veteran talent.

"We've spent a lot of time over the past 12 months looking for ways to better connect with our employees who served and attract new employees from the military ranks," said Global Catering Operations and Logistics Managing Director Ryan Melby, a U.S. Army veteran and the president of our United for Veterans business resource group.

"Our group is launching a mentorship program, for instance, where we'll assign existing employee-veterans to work with new hires who come to us from the armed forces. Having a friend and an ally like that, someone who can help you translate the skills you picked up in the military to what we do as a civilian company, is invaluable. That initiative is still in its infancy, but I'm really optimistic about what it can do for United and for our veteran population here."

Impressively, we were the only one of our industry peers to move up on the list, further evidence that we're on a good track as a company.

Mission Accomplished

By Matt Adams , November 06, 2019

The question of where David Ferrari was had haunted retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Vincent Salceto for the better part of 66 years.

Rarely did a week go by that Salceto didn't think about his old friend. Often, he relived their last moments together in a recurring nightmare. In it, it's once again 1953 and Salceto and Ferrari are patrolling a valley in what is now North Korea. Suddenly, explosions shatter the silence and flares light up the night sky.

Crouching under a barrage of bullets, Salceto, the squad's leader, drags two of his men to safety, then he sees Ferrari lying face down on the ground. He runs out to help him, but he's too late. And that's when he always wakes up.

Italian Americans from opposite coasts – Salceto from Philadelphia, Ferrari from San Francisco – the two became close, almost like brothers, after being assigned to the same unit during the Korean War. When Ferrari died, it hit Salceto hard.

"After that, I never let anyone get close to me like I did with Dave," he says. "I couldn't; I didn't want to go through that again."

When the war ended, Salceto wanted to tell Ferrari's family how brave their son and brother had been in battle. Most of all, he wanted to salute his friend at his gravesite and give him a proper farewell.

For decades, though, Salceto had no luck finding his final resting place or locating any of his relatives. Then, in June of this year, he uncovered a clue that led him to the Italian Cemetary in Colma, California, where Ferrari is buried.

Within days, Salceto, who lives in Franklinville, New Jersey, was packed and sitting aboard United Flight 731 from Philadelphia to San Francisco with his wife, Amy, and daughter, Donna Decker, on his way to Colma. For such a meaningful trip, he even wore his Army dress uniform.

That's how San Francisco-based flight attendant Noreen Baldwin spotted him as he walked down the jet bridge to get on the plane.

"I saw him and said to the other crew members, 'Oh my goodness, look at this guy,'" she says. "I knew there had to be a story."

The two struck up a conversation and Salceto told Baldwin why he was traveling. She got emotional listening to him talk and made a point of fussing over him, making sure he and his family had everything they needed.

About halfway through the flight, Baldwin had an idea. She and her fellow crew members would write messages of encouragement to Salceto and invite his fellow passengers to do the same.

"We did it discreetly," says Baldwin. "I asked the customers if they saw the man in uniform, which most had, and asked them if they wanted to write a few words for him on a cocktail napkin. A lot of people did; families did it together, parents got their kids to write something. After the first few rows, I was so choked up that I could barely talk."

When Baldwin surprised Salceto with dozens of hand-written notes, he, too, was speechless. He laid the stack on his lap and read each one. At the same time, the pilots made an announcement about the veteran over the loud speaker, after which the customers on board burst into applause.

"It seems contrived, and I hate using the word organic, but that's what it was; it just happened," Baldwin says. "Mr. Salceto was so loveable and humble, and what he was doing was so incredible, it felt like the right thing to do. And you could tell he was touched."

On June 27, Salceto finally stood before Ferrari's grave and said that long-awaited goodbye. As a trumpeter played "Taps," he unpinned a medal from his jacket and laid it reverently on the headstone.

"I had gotten a Bronze Star for my actions [the night Ferrari died] with a 'V' for valor, and that was the medal I put on Dave's grave," says Salceto, pausing to fight back tears. "I thought he was more deserving of it than I was."

For the first time in years, Salceto felt at peace. His mission was accomplished.

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