Enchanted by Paraty, Brazil - United Hub
Employee Travel Blog

Enchanted by Paraty, Brazil

By The Hub team, June 09, 2017

Each week we will profile one of our employee's adventures across the globe, featuring a new location for every employee's story. Follow along every week to learn more about their travel experiences.

By Employee Operations Staff Representative Frankie Pagan

I have always said that I would rather have a passport full of stamps than a house full of stuff, and my passion for travel has brought me to more than 62 countries. People always ask me, "What's your favorite destination?" and I always answer, "The one that I'm going to next." However, Brazil is definitely at the top of my favorites list. In fact, it is the country I return to the most.

View of the town of Paraty from the sea.

One of my favorite cities in Brazil is Rio de Janeiro, but just 4.5 hours south of the Marvelous City, as Rio is known, lies a beautiful hidden gem: Paraty - a colonial work of art, where Brazilians and tourists alike share in this beautiful city's old charm and flavor. A visit to this enchanting town will transport you back to the Portuguese colonial era.

Named after a local fish, Paraty sits on Brazil's stunning southeastern Costa Verde coast and is set amid jutting peninsulas and secluded beaches with a backdrop of steep, lush, jungle mountains plunging into an island-studded turquoise bay.

The small colonial town's center is a national historic monument with very well-preserved Portuguese colonial buildings on its pedestrian-only cobblestone streets. Cars are not allowed to enter the town.

Donkey pulls a cart along cobblestone streets in Paraty

Elegant white buildings adorned with fanciful multicolored borders and latticed windows blend harmoniously with the natural beauty that envelops this charming town. Among its architectural landmarks is the waterfront Capela de Santa Rita, a whitewashed church built in 1722. Since 1966, the Brazilian government has recognized Paraty as a National Historic Site.

The town's cosmopolitan flavor is further enhanced by the large number of artists, writers and chefs -- both Brazilian and foreign -- who have settled here and opened shops, galleries and fantastic restaurants. The food options are endless, from international to local beach eats, but be sure to try the local seafood. Bars can be hard to find, so just follow the music. They usually aren't jumping until late.

Outdoor restaurant in Paraty, Brazil.

Paraty has a wide range of accommodations. I recommend that you stay at a pousada, or country inn, near the historical center of town. We stayed at Pousada Literaria de Paraty, a small elegant pousada owned by a Brazilian actress.

The town is very walkable. The vibe is relaxed and carefree. Everyone wears Havaianas, Brazilian flip flops. The locals are warm, friendly and genuinely nice. They are very proud of their delightful town and are always happy to help tourists. Keep an eye out for the monkeys that roam the streets. They are quite amusing and may be waiting for a treat.

A very interesting and unique characteristic of the town is that it floods regularly and intentionally — I heard from the locals that it has an old street-cleaning strategy. It dates back to colonial times, when the city was planned. Since Paraty is below sea level, sidewalks are elevated about a foot above the cobblestones, and, at high tides, ocean waters flood the streets in a timeless ebb and flow. It's best to carry a pair of flip-flops to wear so that you don't ruin your shoes. Some hotels and pousadas offer flip-flops to their guests, but I recommend you by yourself a pair of Havaianas.

In the town's main square, you can watch a capoeira performance, a Brazilian martial art that combines elements of fight, acrobatics, music and dance in a very magnetic way. Check with your hotel for times because it is something you won't want to miss.

For approximately $125, you can rent a boat for the day and head out into the bay to the small islands and coves nearby. Along the way, you can snorkel in the crystal-clear, emerald-green sea and swim in the many secluded beaches. Our boat stopped on one of the islands, where we had a tasty lunch of freshly caught fish, garlicky white rice and Brazilian-style bean stew. Wash it all down with Brazil's national drink, the rum-tastic caipirinha or a refreshing local beer. Then sit back, relax in a beach chair and take it all in.

Tourists swimming at one of the many secluded beaches in Paraty.

It's very easy to reach Paraty once in Brazil. From the U.S., Untied flies nonstop from multiple of our hubs to São Paulo or Rio de Janeiro. Air-conditioned buses leave from both Rio and São Paulo for Paraty. Buses from Rio depart 12+ times a day from the Rodoviaria Novo Rio bus station. The price of one-way a ticket is approximately $25, and the trip takes about 4.5 hours. The trip from São Paulo's Rodoviaria Tiete bus station takes about 6.5 hours and costs about the same. From São Paulo, try Reunidas Paulista bus company and, from Rio de Janeiro, Costa Verde Transportes.

Useful information and tips:

United cargo-only flights transport critical goods

By The Hub team

When the pandemic began, United Cargo knew it would be critical to utilize its fleet, network and industry-leading pharmaceutical handling processes to transport a COVID-19 vaccine when the time came.

Connecting vaccines to the world: United responds to mass distribution effort

December 22, 2020

On November 27, United Airlines became the first commercial airline to safely deliver the first batch of Pfizer and BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine into the U.S. thanks to a coordinated effort between United's cargo, safety, technical operations, flight operations, regulatory and legal teams.

Now as the entire shipping and logistics industry bands together to widely distribute vaccines, United is leveraging all of its flights, including cargo-only and those carrying passengers, to transport millions of vaccines to destinations throughout our network, including Honolulu, Guam and Saipan – the first of any carrier to do so.

United Raises Miles for Dozens of Non-Profits that Rely on Travel

Airline and its customers use crowdsourcing platform - Miles on a Mission - to donate more than 11 million miles for charities like the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, College to Congress and Compass to Care
By United Newsroom, December 01, 2020

CHICAGO, Dec. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- United is inviting MileagePlus members to give back on Giving Tuesday and throughout the holiday season by donating miles to nearly 40 non-profits through United Airlines' crowdsourcing platform, Miles on a Mission. Non-profits like Thurgood Marshall College Fund, College to Congress and Compass to Care are attempting to raise a total of more than 11 million miles to be used for travel for life-saving health care, continued education, humanitarian aid and more. United will match the first 125,000 miles raised for each of these organizations to help ensure they meet their goals.

United Raises Miles for Dozens of Non-Profits that Rely on Travel

Why we fly

By The Hub team, November 27, 2020

In October 2019, we launched a first-of-its-kind airline miles donation platform, Miles on a Mission. In the inaugural year, MileagePlus members donated over 70 million miles, with United matching over 20 million miles, to 51 organizations. These miles have allowed for these organizations to do important, life-changing, life-saving work in the communities we serve around the globe.

Scroll to top