Gone But Not Forgotten - United Hub

Gone but not forgotten

By Matt Adams

Captain Dean McDavid, Standards Director at United's flight training center in Denver, wasn't sure what he'd find when, late last year, he began working his contacts to locate a Gold Star family – the family of a U.S. service member killed in action – that could use a helping hand.

McDavid leads the Denver chapter of United for Veterans, an employee association for military veterans at the airline, which was newly established in Colorado, and the membership was anxious to hit the ground running with a worthy objective in mind: to honor the fallen by embracing the living. They had no doubt they could do some good; they just needed some direction. Then, one afternoon, McDavid received the call he'd been waiting for.

Major General Michael Loh, Adjutant General of the Colorado National Guard and one of McDavid's friends from his days in the U.S. Air Force, relayed to him the story of the Sampers family, the widow and children of U.S. Navy Petty Officer First Class James Sampers, who was killed in Vietnam in 1969.

One of his sons, Jim Sampers, had recently been diagnosed with a pre-leukemia condition known as myelodysplasia, which required a stem cell transplant. His sister, Christina Ribbens, had been cleared as a donor, but there was one problem: she lived in Colorado and Jim is being treated in Calgary, Canada. With medical bills and other expenses piling up, the cost of airfare for Ribbens to fly back and forth for preliminary tests and the procedure added another layer of stress to an already difficult situation.

Hearing that, McDavid thought of a way to ease their burden. Working with Transplant Recipients International Organization (TRIO), one of United's non-profit partners, he and his group helped arrange travel for Ribbens and her mother, Patricia Sampers, using miles generously donated by United MileagePlus members.

"When Christina and I talked, I told her, 'First of all, we appreciate everything your dad did,'" says McDavid. "I let her know that we were here to support his family members just like he would have wanted."

Ribbens knew it would make her dad proud to know his brothers and sisters in arms are still looking out for him. "I imagine if he were here, he would be doing the same thing for others," she says, fighting back tears. "That's the kind of man he was."

U.S. Navy Petty Officer First Class James Sampers

Jim, like his sister, was touched, but he's not surprised by gestures like this anymore. From his siblings stepping up without hesitation to donate their stem cells (his brothers, Ron and Steve, were also tested, but neither was a match), to his sister giving him the gift of life, to the love and encouragement he's received since his diagnosis, he is regularly reminded of the goodness in this world. But this experience had the added benefit of reminding him of his father's goodness as well.

"Family was very important to Dad," Jim says, drawing from the images of his father that are etched into his memory. "He was a jokester and he loved to tease, but he was very loyal."

The military is itself a family, one in which loyalty stands above all else, even bravery. Loyalty to your country, loyalty to the men and women on either side of you, and loyalty to those who came before you and made the ultimate sacrifice. As they bow their heads in solemn remembrance on Memorial Day this month, Denver's United for Veterans members will reaffirm their loyalty with a commitment to keep fighting for those who fought to their last breath.

"There's nothing wrong with laying wreaths and planting flags next to gravestones," McDavid says. "But we can't forget the loved ones those veterans left behind. As much as anything, that's how we can show our gratitude."

To learn more about how United and TRIO assist transplant recipients, living donors and their families, visit donate.mileageplus.com

We fly crucial medical equipment for COVID-19 testing

By The Hub team , March 31, 2020

In the midst of mobilizing our cargo operations, our teams at New York/Newark (EWR) and Jacksonville (JAX) stepped in to assist Roche Diagnostics with transporting a vital component for an instrument being used for COVID-19 testing.

The component was stuck at EWR en route to the Mayo Clinic in Florida after another airline's flights were cancelled. A Roche employee contacted us asking for help and, within a few hours, our teams had the piece loaded onto a Jacksonville-bound aircraft, with arrangements in place to deliver it to the Mayo Clinic.

The item we shipped will allow the Mayo Clinic in Florida to process hundreds of COVID-19 tests per day. Mayo Clinic Laboratories has been on the front lines of increasing testing capacity to expedite caring for patients at this critical time and working to ease the burden being felt at test processing laboratories in a growing number of areas.

Cargo-only flights serve U.S. military and their families

By The Hub team , March 30, 2020
We are helping to keep military families connected by increasing the frequency of cargo-only flights between the United States and military bases in various parts of the world — including Guam, Kwajalein, and several countries in Europe. Last week we began operating a minimum of 40 cargo-only flights weekly — using Boeing 777 and 787 aircraft to fly freight and mail to and from U.S. hubs and key international business and military locations.

We are going above and beyond to find creative ways to transport fresh food and produce, as well as basic essentials from the U.S. mainland to military and their families in Guam/Micronesia. On Saturday, March 28, we operated an exclusive cargo-only B777-300 charter to transport nearly 100,000 pounds of food essentials to Guam to support our troops.

United ramp crew members help place cargo on a United flight

In addition, we move mail year-round all over the world. In response to COVID-19, and in support of the military members and their families overseas, we implemented a charter network, transporting military mail to Frankfurt, which is then transported all over Europe and the Middle East. Since March 20, we have flown 30,000+ pounds of military mail every day between Chicago O'Hare (ORD) and Frankfurt (FRA). On the return flight from Frankfurt to Chicago, we have carried an average of 35,000 pounds of mail to help families stay connected.

"Connecting products and mail to people around the world is the United Cargo mission," said United Cargo President Jan Krems. "Keeping our military families connected with the goods they need, and keeping them connected with loved ones to feel a sense of home, is of critical importance. As a company that has long supported our military families and veterans, our teams are proud to mobilize to lend a hand."

On average, we ship more than 1 billion pounds of cargo every year on behalf of domestic and international customers. For more information, visit unitedcargo.com.

An update from our CEO, Oscar Munoz

By Oscar Munoz, CEO, United Airlines , March 27, 2020

To our customers,

I hope this note finds you and your loved ones healthy and well.

It is safe to say these past weeks have been among some of the most tumultuous and emotional that any of us can remember in our lifetimes. The impact of the coronavirus outbreak has been felt by individuals and families, companies and communities, across the United States and around the world.

The response to this crisis has been extraordinary; as much for what it has required from our society as for what it has revealed of us as a people.

Far from causing division and discord, this crisis and the social distancing it has required, has allowed us to witness something profound and moving about ourselves: our fond and deeply felt wish to be connected with one another.

The role of connector is one we're privileged to play in the moments that matter most in your life – weddings and graduations, birthdays and business trips, events large and small – and it's that responsibility that motivates us most to get back to our regular service, as soon as possible.

That is why it is so important our government acted on a comprehensive relief act to ensure our airline – and our industry – are ready and able to serve you again when this crisis abates.

I want to relay to you, in as deeply personal a way I can, the heartfelt appreciation of my 100,000 United team members and their families for this vital public assistance to keep America and United flying for you.

This support will save jobs in our business and many others. And it allows us time to make decisions about the future of our airline to ensure that we can offer you the service you deserve and have come to expect as our customers.

While consumer demand has fallen, we have seen the need for our service and capabilities shifted. And, we've adapted to help meet those needs.

Right now, aircraft flying the United livery and insignia, flown by our aviation professionals, have been repurposed to deliver vital medical supplies and goods to some of the places that need it most. We're also using several of our idle widebody aircraft to use as dedicated charter cargo flights, at least 40 times per week, to transfer freight to and from U.S. locations as well as to key international business locations. At the same time, we are working in concert with the U.S. State Department to bring stranded Americans who are trying to return home back to their loved ones.

While much remains uncertain right now, one thing is for sure: this crisis will pass. Our nation and communities will recover and United will return to service you, our customers. When that happens, we want you to fly United with even greater pride because of the actions we took on behalf of our customers, our employees and everyone we serve.

Stay safe and be well,

Oscar Munoz
CEO

Scroll to top