How we lost our hearts to the Boeing 747 - United Hub
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How we lost our hearts to the 747

By The Hub team, November 09, 2017

The Boeing 747 has earned its reputation as a revolutionary aircraft. Over its 47 years of service with United Airlines, the Queen of the Skies has built up a considerable fanbase.

The 747 debuted in 1968 as the largest civilian airplane in the world, with a 225-foot-long body, a tail as tall as a six-story building, and wings that covered more area than a basketball court. Nicknamed the "jumbo jet," the world's first wide-body passenger aircraft was so enormous, in fact, that it required the construction of a new assembly plant in Everett, Washington – still the largest building in the world by volume, at 200 million cubic feet.

The 747 is a masterful feat of engineering, balancing size, power, and efficiency. It was the first plane to introduce "big fan" engines, but it will always be known for its unique upper deck, which gives its silhouette that iconic hump. With its widebody design and double aisles, the 747 boasted another all-important perk: it felt infinitely roomier than its peers.

"It is a very comfortable ride," says aviation industry expert Karlene Petitt, who has flown the 747 as both a passenger and a pilot. "It is such a cool plane."

The Boeing 747 was developed during a time when supersonic travel was expected to become the preferred mode of transport. While it doesn't quite hit that velocity, the current model is one of the fastest passenger planes in the skies today, capable of flying near the speed of sound.

Its widebody design also meant that it was the first aircraft with enough seating to make air travel affordable and convenient to many people. The costs per seat were lower for airlines, which meant that they could offer cheaper fares to fill those 300 to 400 seats.

"The 747 was the great door-opener to public air travel," says Addison Schonland, airline industry analyst and founder and partner at the AirInsight consultancy. "The economic barrier was removed. The many Americans who fantasized about visiting Rome, Paris, and London could get there and do so with enough money left over to visit places, eat out, and sleep over," Schonland continues. "Even backpackers benefited from the 747."

From the start, the 747's most important contribution to society has been its ability to bring people together, across oceans and continents. "You could go the distance," say Petitt. "It connected the world."

"It may be seen as one of the great contributors to better global understanding," Schonland says, "as people were able to fly long distances and learn about other people firsthand."

United cargo-only flights transport critical goods

By The Hub team

When the pandemic began, United Cargo knew it would be critical to utilize its fleet, network and industry-leading pharmaceutical handling processes to transport a COVID-19 vaccine when the time came.

Connecting vaccines to the world: United responds to mass distribution effort

December 22, 2020

On November 27, United Airlines became the first commercial airline to safely deliver the first batch of Pfizer and BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine into the U.S. thanks to a coordinated effort between United's cargo, safety, technical operations, flight operations, regulatory and legal teams.

Now as the entire shipping and logistics industry bands together to widely distribute vaccines, United is leveraging all of its flights, including cargo-only and those carrying passengers, to transport millions of vaccines to destinations throughout our network, including Honolulu, Guam and Saipan – the first of any carrier to do so.

United Raises Miles for Dozens of Non-Profits that Rely on Travel

Airline and its customers use crowdsourcing platform - Miles on a Mission - to donate more than 11 million miles for charities like the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, College to Congress and Compass to Care
By United Newsroom, December 01, 2020

CHICAGO, Dec. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- United is inviting MileagePlus members to give back on Giving Tuesday and throughout the holiday season by donating miles to nearly 40 non-profits through United Airlines' crowdsourcing platform, Miles on a Mission. Non-profits like Thurgood Marshall College Fund, College to Congress and Compass to Care are attempting to raise a total of more than 11 million miles to be used for travel for life-saving health care, continued education, humanitarian aid and more. United will match the first 125,000 miles raised for each of these organizations to help ensure they meet their goals.

United Raises Miles for Dozens of Non-Profits that Rely on Travel

Why we fly

By The Hub team, November 27, 2020

In October 2019, we launched a first-of-its-kind airline miles donation platform, Miles on a Mission. In the inaugural year, MileagePlus members donated over 70 million miles, with United matching over 20 million miles, to 51 organizations. These miles have allowed for these organizations to do important, life-changing, life-saving work in the communities we serve around the globe.

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