Ms. Fix-It - United Hub
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Ms. Fix-it

By Matt Adams

Yolanda Gong had been awaiting this challenge all day. As fellow competitors looked on, she took a pipette and carefully removed lubricant from a jet engine, then injected it into a handheld machine to analyze its viscosity, a process that aircraft maintenance technicians use to gauge an engine's health. She moved quickly with a steady hand and steely confidence, and if you watched her closely, you would have caught a glimpse of who she was, back in a laboratory in another life, when she was living someone else's dream.

Each participant was allotted 15 minutes, which was 11 minutes and 44 seconds longer than Gong needed. It was the fastest time recorded at last spring's Aerospace Maintenance Competition – which draws civilian, military and student technicians from all over the country, all vying for coveted bragging rights – where she captained the team from West Los Angeles College. The oil analysis was just one event in which she and her teammates competed over the course of three days, during which Gong impressed a lot of people, including the members of United's all-female "Chix Fix" team, who were also there.

"When I saw her on stage receiving awards, I knew Yolanda would make a good addition to the United team, not to mention a strong competitor for Chix Fix," says United's San Francisco-based Airframe Overhaul and Repair Managing Director Bonnie Turner. "Her professionalism and talent caught my attention that day, and I've been thrilled to have her as a technician."

In September, after earning her airframe and powerplant license, Gong was hired by United to work at its San Francisco maintenance base as an Aircraft Interior Repair Tech. To Gong, meeting Turner and the women of Chix Fix was serendipity; a chance encounter that led to a life-changing opportunity. But that's not entirely true. She might have been in the right place at the right time, but make no mistake – her success is a byproduct of effort and ability. She's doing what she was meant to do, though it took her traveling an unconventional path to get to this place of self-realization.

Growing up, Gong's mother and father steered her toward a more genteel career. In their minds, she would become a doctor or a lawyer. In other words, something "suitable for a woman," a notion that rankled their mechanically-inclined daughter. In the end, Gong settled on medicine for many of the same reasons she would eventually move into aircraft maintenance.

"I was interested in how the body works," she says. "I like systems and puzzles, looking at causes and effects."

She completed her pre-med studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, but when it came time to take the MCAT and apply to medical school, Gong found herself at a crossroads. She realized her own goals were more important than the ones someone else had set for her, and she certainly wasn't going to let something like expectations based on gender stand in her way. After some soul searching, she enrolled in West Los Angeles College's aviation technology program, where she was one of only four women in a class of around 30 students.

"I've always wanted to know how to use tools and do things for myself," says Gong. "And I never paid attention when someone told me, 'You can't do that.' I've always said, 'Well, let me try.'"

Over the past few months since graduating, Gong has been a rising star at United. She's even set to return to the Aerospace Maintenance Competition in April, this time as part of team Chix Fix, where she and her colleagues plan to show what they can do.

"It's likely there will be a shortage of technicians soon," Gong says, "so I want to make sure women know opportunities are here for them. Don't let anyone tell you what you can or can't love. The only thing stopping you from doing what you want is your belief in yourself. It's incredibly freeing when you stop caring what other people think and just do it."

United Cargo operates more than 11,000 cargo-only flights in one year

By The Hub team, March 19, 2021

On March 19, 2020, United operated its first flight carrying cargo without passengers on board. While the passenger cabin was empty, its cargo hold was completely full, carrying more than 29,000 pounds of commodities from Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD) to Frankfurt Airport (FRA).

A year later, United Cargo has operated more than 11,000 cargo-only flights carrying more than 570 million pounds of freight. To support the COVID-19 pandemic recovery efforts, United Cargo has also transported more than 113 million pounds of medical and pharmaceutical products on both cargo-only and passenger flights as well as approximately 10 million COVID-19 vaccines, providing global communities access to the items they have needed most.

10 tips for spring travel

By The Hub team, February 24, 2021

Whether you haven't flown with us for a while or just need a quick refresher before your spring trip, read this list of tips to know before your flight and arrive at the airport travel-ready:

1. Download the United app for contactless bag check, travel assistance and more

Before your flight, download the United app to view your flight status, check in, sign up for flight notifications, locate departure gates, access our free personal device entertainment when available and more. We've also updated our app with new features that can make your trip a little safer, including contactless bag check.

Don't forget to use Agent on Demand for help with any and all questions you may have before your flight. This new capability is available at all our U.S. hub airports and allows you to use your own mobile device to contact a customer service agent via phone, video or chat to help with day-of-travel questions while you're at the airport. Learn more about Agent on Demand here.

United joins UNICEF COVAX initiative

By The Hub team, February 19, 2021

This week, we were honored to become the first U.S. airline to join the UNICEF Humanitarian Airfreight Initiative to combat the COVID-19 pandemic by transporting the vaccine and other critically needed supplies to underserved areas of the globe.

"We are committed to helping the global community in any way we can, and we all must work together to do our part to bring this health and humanitarian crisis to an end," said Director of Cargo Specialty Products Manu Jacobs.

We will leverage our expertise to transport these critical pharmaceutical and healthcare shipments around the world safely, efficiently and expediently. We are proud to partner with the United Nations to support this global effort and provide equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines.

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