Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month - United Hub
culture

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month

By The Hub team, September 22, 2016

Updated October 13, 2016

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, we've asked a few of our team members to share stories and tips from their home countries.

Cuba

Malecòn, roadway in Havana, CubaMalecòn, the main road and seawall along the coast in Havana, Cuba.

Below meet Hermes as he shares his memories and tips from his home country of Cuba. His family moved from Cuba to Madrid in 1970 when he was seven years old.

Hermes childhood photosPictured left is a young Hermes sporting a traditional Cuban attire. On the right is a childhood celebration in Havana.

Hermes Pineda - Managing Director of Airport Operations and Cargo Human Resources

Cuban culture is unique in the Caribbean. Cuban people love music and we love to dance. For many years, Havana was the epicenter of the Caribbean for aspiring musicians looking to make it big, and many did, like Celia Cruz and Benny More. Today, Cubans continue to love their music, and also relish sports like baseball, boxing, and track and field. In addition, the art scene there, led by many wonderful — but not well-known — painters and sculptors, is exploding.

As in many other Caribbean countries, food and drink are an important part of Cuban life. Thinly sliced green plantains, and rice and black beans are staples. Seafood is always great there; after all, it is the largest island in the Caribbean. Roasted pork is a delicacy typically reserved for festive times or special occasions. If you visit, look for small, family-owned restaurants for the most authentic cuisine. A Cuba Libre made with Havana Club rum is a delicious traditional drink.

I'm excited to go back once United resumes service to Havana in November. Of course I'm curious to see the people and places after all these years. My half-brother still has family and friends there, so I am looking forward to reconnecting with them. Cuban people are warm and welcoming, and they're happy that more Americans will be coming to the island.

When you visit, skip the tourist traps and get out into the local neighborhoods and the countryside to see Cuba for what it really is. Walk around and meet people, sample the food and experience all that it has to offer. In Havana, go and see the Malecòn, the main road and seawall along the beachfront. Seek out the now up-and-coming artists; many of them are becoming more publicized now, and art dealers are taking notice. The squares or, plazas, in Cuba are actually quite similar to those in Spain and Italy, with painters on the corners selling their work.

Peru

Machu Picchu, PeruMachu Picchu, an Incan citadel set high in the Andes Mountains in Peru.

Below meet Hector and Patty as they share insights and recommendations from their home country of Peru.

Hector Calderon in Peru with familyAbove left Hector with his mom, pictured right is Machu Picchu, a main attraction in Peru.

Hector Calderon – Dulles based ramp supervisor

Home to Machu Picchu and the capital of the Incan Empire, visiting Peru is a life-changing experience. Though our family moved to the U.S., we still have relatives in Baranco, a district of Lima where my mom lived. Similarly to many Hispanic countries, Peru is very family-oriented. It is common for many generations to live together – it is actually pretty rare for people to move out of their family home.

Tradition and history are very important to Peruvians and are easily maintained due to generations living so close together. We share traditional meals and really enjoy home cooking. Unlike in the U.S., there aren't many big corporations and most of the restaurants are mom and pop shops serving up traditional Peruvian dishes like ceviche. Ceviche is a seafood dish made from raw fish that has been marinated in citrus juice and mixed with vegetables such as onions and tomatoes. This dish pairs perfectly with pisco, Peru's high-proof spirit made from distilled grapes.

Additionally, there's plenty to see in Peru. Of course, there is Machu Picchu, where the archaeological remains from the Incan Empire are still very much intact. If you visit Peru you will undoubtedly visit this site where buildings, walls, stairs and life from our ancestors can still be seen. It's surreal to know that this was once the home to Incans, at what was the peak of the empire's power.

Patty Alvitez hiking on the Inca TrailsAbove Patty is hiking on the Inca Trails.

Patty Alvitez – Portland based airport operations supervisor

I moved to the U.S., but have many relatives, including my parents, who still live in Lima. When I go back to Peru I always go straight to my parent's home. We love to go to a restaurant called La Rosa Nautica. It's a fine dining restaurant on the ocean pier very close to Miraflores, an upscale residential and shopping district. It's a great place to spend special occasions. You'll definitely need to try a pisco sour, a Peruvian drink made from pisco, egg whites and lime juice.

First, you should head to Aguas Calientes, a three-and-a-half hour train ride from Cusco where you can spend the day hiking, eating delicious foods and if you are like me and love shopping, there are plenty of great shops to peruse. I recommend spending the night in Aguas Calientes and waking up early to see the sunrise on Machu Picchu. That morning you can take a 15-minute van to Machu Picchu. It is truly the most beautiful sight.

Another attraction to see are the Inca Trails that stretch between the city of Cusco and all the way to the ruins of Machu Picchu. There are many different trail routes that you can take with varying difficulty levels, but it's an amazing way to see the gorgeous countryside, rivers, waterfalls, animals and the Andes Mountains. Some trail routes lead to the Cocalmayo hot springs, which is also a bonus.

Mexico City

Mexico City, Mexico

This year, United is celebrating its 50 th year serving Mexico. Below are stories about what you can expect to find and what you should do when visiting Mexico City.

Mexico's all-inclusive resorts and gorgeous beaches make it a popular vacation destination. Traveling inward from the beaches to some of Mexico's landlocked areas is where you will find some of Mexico's most historical districts.

Zocala, main square, Mexico CityZocalo is the main square of Mexico city, and was once the Aztec's ceremonial center.

Ricardo Albarran Sanchez – Denver based Flight Attendant

Mexico City is a blend of a modern, cosmopolitan city mixed with remnants from the city's past. There are high-rise buildings, amazing architecture, the people are always welcoming and the population is growing rapidly. Churches, temples and even a castle remain from years of conquistadors. The Chapultepec Castle dates back to the 1700's when it was home to royalty. Today, Mexico's National History Museum lives in the castle, I highly suggest checking it out.

Ricardo also suggests traveling just 50 miles south of Mexico City where you'll find the small country town of Cuernavaca, the perfect place for rest and relaxation. Locals enjoy visiting Cuernavaca to socialize, catch up on politics and to enjoy time out from the day to day rush. Think of it as the Hamptons of Mexico City, only full of Mexican tradition and culture.

Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Mexico CityPictured left is the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe. On the right is Arlette overlooking Mexico City.

Arlette Martinez - Cargo Analysis Representative, Chicago

My dad lived in Guanajuato and my mom lived in Hidalgo, both states are very close to Mexico City, in Central, Southern Mexico. I still have a lot of family there, which gives me an excuse to visit almost once a year. Each neighborhood has a plaza that is brimming with authentic Mexican culture. Locals congregate in the plazas to enjoy shops, vendors selling artifacts, traditional Mexican restaurants and street food. My favorite plazas are in Coyoacan, which is a historic borough in Mexico City's Federal District, and Zocalo which is the main plaza in Mexico City and once the center of the Aztec capital.

Just 30 minutes away from Zocalo is the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe, which is one of the world's most visited Catholic shrines. Even if you're not interested in religion the Basilica's architecture is truly unique.

Nicaragua

Cathedral of Granada, NicaraguaCathedral of Granada

Below meet Francisco and Ana as they share stories and tips from their home country of Nicaragua.

La Cruz de Bobadilla, NicaraguaLa Cruz de Bobadilla is a cross planted at the tip of the volcano to drive away evil.

Francisco Maestas - Airport Operations Customer Service Manager, Houston

My family is from Somoto, a city in northern Nicaragua. I love visiting my family in Nicaragua, my grandparents lived in a small town called Leon. When you visit Nicaragua you must see the Granada, the Spanish colonial ruins that survived numerous invasions. Also visiting the Masaya Volcano is a must. The volcano is still active, but you can hike up it and tour the underground tunnels that were created by flowing lava. My favorite memory is swimming in Laguna de Xiloa, a volcanic crater that is filled with fresh water — the aquatic life and snorkeling is amazing.

Ava and surf town, San Juan del SurAbove left Ana arrives at Corn Island, pictured right is surf town, San Juan del Sur

Ana Carranza - Ramp Service Employee, Los Angeles

When you come to Nicaragua you will notice how welcoming the locals are, and how diverse the country is from its people to its geography. The Corn Islands off the Atlantic coast offer a serene atmosphere for relaxing — you won't believe that you're still in Nicaragua with how mellow the islands are. On the pacific side there is the vibrant San Juan del Sur,, a coastal town known for its exuberant surf community. The best time to come to Nicaragua is during Semana Santa, or Holy Week, at the end of March. There are tons of festivities, carnivals and the beaches come alive with people enjoying time with their loved ones.

Jessica Kimbrough named Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer

By The Hub team, July 10, 2020

Jessica Kimbrough, currently Labor Relations and Legal Strategy Managing Director, will take on the new role of Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer Managing Director.

Jessica assumes this new and expanded position to focus on global inclusion and equity as part of our enhanced commitment to ensure best practices across the business to strengthen our culture.

In this role, Jessica will be responsible for helping United redefine our efforts on diversity, equity and inclusion – ensuring that our programs and approach are strategic, integrated and outcome-oriented, while we continue to build a culture that reflects our core values. She will report to Human Resources and Labor Relations EVP Kate Gebo.

"Jessica's appointment to this role is another critical step our executive team is taking to ensure diversity, equity and inclusion remains a top priority at United," said CEO Scott Kirby. "Given her drive, experience and commitment to champion collaboration and allyship among our employee business resource groups, she is uniquely qualified to take on this position and I look forward to working closely with her."

As Labor Relations and Legal Strategy Managing Director, Jessica worked closely with senior management to create and maintain positive labor relations among our unionized workforce, providing counsel on labor litigation, negotiations, contract administration, organizing issues and managing attorneys who represent United in labor relations. Previously, she served as Labor and Employment Counsel in our legal department.

Jessica has a passion for creating a pipeline of diverse lawyers and leaders, and was honored as one of Chicago Defender's "Women of Excellence" for excellence in her career and civic engagement in 2017. She currently serves as President of uIMPACT, our women's employee business resource group.

Jessica's new role is effective immediately.

United Cargo and logistics partners keep critical medical shipments moving

By The Hub team, July 02, 2020

By working together and strengthening partnerships during these unprecedented times, our global community has overcome challenges and created solutions to keep the global supply chain moving. As COVID-19 continues to disrupt the shipping landscape, United and our industry partners have increasingly demonstrated our commitment to the mission of delivering critical medical supplies across the world.

United Cargo has partnered with DSV Air and Sea, a leading global logistics company, to transport important pharmaceutical materials to places all over the world. One of the items most critical during the current crisis is blood plasma.

Plasma is a fragile product that requires very careful handling. Frozen blood plasma must be kept at a very low, stable temperature of negative 20 degrees Celsius or less – no easy task considering it must be transported between trucks, warehouses and airplanes, all while moving through the climates of different countries. Fortunately, along with our well-developed operational procedures and oversight, temperature-controlled shipping containers from partners like va-Q-tec can help protect these sensitive blood plasma shipments from temperature changes.

A single TWINx shipping container from va-Q-tec can accommodate over 1,750 pounds of temperature-sensitive cargo. Every week, DSV delivers 20 TWINx containers, each one filled to capacity with human blood plasma, for loading onto a Boeing 787-9 for transport. The joint effort to move thousands of pounds of blood plasma demonstrates that despite the distance, challenges in moving temperature-sensitive cargo and COVID-19 obstacles, we continue to find creative solutions with the help of our strong partnerships.

United Cargo is proud to keep the commercial air bridges open between the U.S. and the rest of the world. Since March 19, we have operated over 3,200 cargo-only flights between six U.S. hubs and over 20 cities in Asia, Australia, Europe, South America, India, the Caribbean and the Middle East.

Celebrating Juneteenth

By United Airlines, June 18, 2020

A message from UNITE, United Airlines Multicultural Business Resource Group

Fellow United team members –

Hello from the UNITE leadership team. While we communicate frequently with our 3,500 UNITE members, our platform doesn't typically extend to the entire United family, and we are grateful for the opportunity to share some of our thoughts with all of you.

Tomorrow is June 19. On this day in 1865, shortened long ago to "Juneteenth," Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce that the Civil War had ended and all enslaved individuals were free. For many in the African-American community, particularly in the South, it is recognized as the official date slavery ended in the United States.

Still, despite the end of slavery, the Constitutional promise that "All men are created equal" would overlook the nation's Black citizens for decades to come. It wasn't until nearly a century later that the Civil Rights Act (1964) ended legal segregation and the Voting Rights Act (1965) protected voting rights for Black Americans. But while the nation has made progress, the killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd have made it undeniably clear that we still have a lot of work to do to achieve racial parity and inclusion.

Two weeks ago, Scott and Brett hosted a virtual town hall and set an important example by taking a minute, as Brett said, "to lower my guard, take off my armor, and just talk to you. And talk to you straight from the heart."

Difficult conversations about race and equity are easy to avoid. But everyone needs to have these conversations – speaking honestly, listening patiently and understanding that others' experiences may be different from your own while still a valid reflection of some part of the American experience.

To support you as you consider these conversations, we wanted to share some resources from one of United's partners, The National Museum of African American History and Culture. The museum will host an all-day Virtual Juneteenth Celebration to recognize Juneteenth through presentations, stories, photographs and recipes. The museum also has a portal that United employees can access called Talking About Race, which provides tools and guidance for everyone to navigate conversations about race.

Our mission at UNITE is to foster an inclusive working environment for all of our employees. While we are hopeful and even encouraged by the widespread and diverse show of support for African Americans around the country – and at United - we encourage everyone to spend some time on Juneteenth reflecting on racial disparities that remain in our society and dedicating ourselves to the work that still must be done to fight systemic racism. By honoring how far we've come and honestly acknowledging how far we still must go, we believe United – and the incredible people who are the heart and soul of this airline - can play an important role in building a more fair and just world.

Thank you,

UNITE (United Airlines Multicultural Business Resource Group)

Leadership Team

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