One Fine Day: Boston - United Hub
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One fine day: Boston

By The Hub team

Story by Ellen Carpenter | Rhapsody May 2018

9 a.m.

America's oldest park, Boston Common, was founded in 1634 and has, over the years, served as cow pastures, an encampment for the Redcoats before the Revolutionary War, a cemetery, a recruitment center for the Civil War, and a '60s protest hub. Now, it's a really great place to drink coffee and make way for ducklings. Grab a cup of Stumptown and a decadent chocolate croissant at the Thinking Cup on Tremont Street and walk under the weeping willows and past the swan boats gliding on the pond until you find a free bench to take it all in.

A latte at Thinking CupA latte at Thinking Cup

10:30 a.m.

Hop on the T (the country's oldest subway) for a quick ride to Cambridge, where you'll emerge at Harvard Square and fight your way through throngs of students late for class—and buskers hoping to score some change from those students' Starbucks orders—to get to the Fogg Museum. Renzo Piano redesigned the Harvard Art Museums (yes, plural) in 2014, putting them all under one glass roof, but the Fogg still stands out as the best. For today, just stick to the greatest hits on the first floor: a Van Gogh self-portrait, Renoir's At the Milliner's Paintings, Toulouse-Lautrec's The Hangover. Speaking of a drink…

A gallery at the Fogg MuseumA gallery at the Fogg Museum

12:30 p.m.

It's lunchtime, and, well, you're not working, so what harm can a Bloody Moira do? Settle in at Mamaleh's—a much-celebrated one-year-old Jewish deli in Kendall Square that's part nostalgia trip and part modern classic—for its spin on the brunch cocktail (dill Aquavit and caper berries do the trick). Add a house-cured-pastrami Reuben and an order of perfectly crisp and craggy latkes on the side. And a full sour pickle. And maybe some blintzes…

Blintzes at Mamaleh'sBlintzes at Mamaleh's

2:30 p.m.

Time for a walk. The Granary Burying Ground may get all the tourists (three signers of the Constitution and Paul Revere, after all), but Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge is the real beauty. Inspired by Paris's Père Lachaise, it's the country's first park cemetery, designed in the 1830s as a tranquil space to help the grieving accept death. A who's who of 19th-century Massachusetts royalty call it (everlasting) home: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Charles Sumner, Dorothea Dix, Winslow Homer. Famous tombstones aside, it's simply a gorgeous park, with pink dogwoods, waterfalls of wisteria, and vivid azaleas. At the summit of the ascending grounds, a spiral staircase within the feudal Washington Tower takes you 62 feet higher, where an unparalleled 360-degree view of the region spreads out beyond the battlements.

4:30 p.m.

Hop a cab back to Boston proper—and we mean proper—to your stylish Common-facing room at The Four Seasons, which received a multimillion-dollar upgrade last year (the pops of canary yellow throughout do wonders for your mood). That “Sleep Temple" bed might be calling, but so is the eighth-floor whirlpool. It being 4:30 on a weekday, you'll likely have it all to yourself. Watching the wind blow through the willows in the Public Garden while you let all your stress melt away may be the highlight of the day.

A room at the Four SeasonsA room at the Four Seasons

6:30 p.m.

After an invigorating shower (is it possible to live at the Four Seasons?), you're ready for a dinner. Walk down stately Commonwealth Avenue to Uni, a contemporary izakaya from Ken Oringer and Tony Messina that scored a well-deserved 2018 James Beard nomination. Start with the Uni Spoon, a sumptuous bite of osetra caviar, quail egg yolk, and yuzu that tastes like the sea wrapped in silk (this is a bite to remember). From there, go for a mix of cold and hot small plates: a hamachi duet with the uncanny but seriously delicious pairings of banana, black truffle, and pork belly croutons; a buttery spicy tuna and foie gras tataki; cacio e pepe dumplings topped with corn and lobster; and, if you can make room, duck carnitas with green papaya salsa. Finally, be sure to put yourself in the hands of the sommelier for a customized sake flight.

Uni, a contemporary izakaya Uni

9 p.m.

But the night's not over yet. Amble on over to Yvonne's, an opulent restaurant and bar that has seemingly become the most Instagrammable spot in Beantown (try not to snap a picture of the vintage crystal chandeliers or the pressed tin coffered ceiling). For a drinkable piece of Boston history, order a Ward 8—rye, sherry, grenadine, lemon, and orange—a cocktail invented in 1898, in this exact location, when it was Locke-Ober, the third restaurant to open in the city. Then raise your cut-crystal glass and toast to Boston, past and future.

The Ward 8 cocktail at Yvonne's

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Adjusting to Customer Demand, United Adds New Nonstop Service to Florida

By United Newsroom, August 12, 2020

CHICAGO, Aug. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- United Airlines today announced plans to add up to 28 daily nonstop flights this winter connecting customers in Boston, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, New York/LaGuardia, Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio to four popular Florida destinations. The new, nonstop flights reflect United's continuing strategy to aggressively, and opportunistically manage the impact of COVID-19 by increasing service to destinations where customers most want to fly.

Entertainment for all

By The Hub team, August 04, 2020

Our Marketing Inflight Entertainment and Connectivity team and Bridge, our Business Resource Group (BRG) for people with all abilities, partnered together to test and provide feedback on our award-winning seatback inflight entertainment (IFE) system.

Aptly named "Entertainment for all," our new seatback IFE system offers the an extensive suite of accessibility features, allowing for unassisted use by people of all visual, hearing, mobility and language abilities.

"It's nice to know that I can get on a plane and pick my favorite entertainment to enjoy, just like every customer," said Accessibility Senior Analyst and Developer and Bridge Chief of Staff Ray C., who is blind.

"As a deaf employee, the closed captioning availability on board our aircraft is something I value greatly," added Information Technology Analyst Greg O. "The new IFE further cements United's visibility within the deaf community and elsewhere. It makes me proud to be an employee."

Accessibility features of the new IFE include a text-to-speech option, explore by touch, customizable text size, screen magnification, color correction and inversion modes, and alternative navigation options for those unable to swipe or use a handset. For hearing-impaired and non-English-speaking passengers, customization options provide the ability for customers to be served content and receive inflight notifications based on their preferences and settings —with closed captions, with subtitles or in the language of their choice from the 15 languages supported. Our "Entertainment for all" system won the Crystal Cabin Award in 2019, and recently, the Dr. Margaret Pfanstiehl Research and Development Award for Audio Description by the American Council of the Blind.

"This really showed the benefits of partnering with BRGs in helping us improve products and services for our customers and employees," said Inflight Entertainment and Connectivity Senior Manager Corinne S. "Even though we have been recognized with awards for our IFE accessibility features, we are not resting on our laurels but continuing to work towards improving the inflight entertainment experience for all of our customers to ensure entertainment is available for all."

Shaping an inclusive future with Special Olympics

By The Hub team, July 24, 2020

If your travels have taken you through Chicago O'Hare International Airport anytime since October 2019, you may have had a friendly, caring and jovial exchange with Daniel Smrokowski. Daniel is one of four Service Ambassadors thanks to our ongoing partnership with Special Olympics. This inaugural ambassador program aims to provide Special Olympic athletes employment opportunities within our operation, affording them a unique and meaningful career.

Since 2018, our partnership with Special Olympics has become one of United's most cherished relationships, going beyond the events we take part in and volunteer with. While the plane pull competitions, polar plunges, duck derbies and Special Olympics World Games and other events around the world are a big part of our involvement, the heart of this partnership lies with the athletes and individuals supported by Special Olympics. To advocate for their inclusion in every setting is one of our biggest honors, and we take great pride in the role we play in the organization's inclusion revolution.

Aiding in the success of Special Olympics' mission to create continuing opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities, throughout the two-year partnership, United has volunteered over 10,500 hours and donated over $1.2 million in travel to the organization. The impact of this partnership is felt at every level, both at Special Olympics and within our own ranks.

"The Inclusion Revolution campaign, led by our athletes, aims to end discrimination against people with intellectual disabilities. United Airlines has joined in our fight for inclusion, empowering our athletes with the skills needed to succeed and opportunities to contribute their abilities as leaders," said Special Olympics International Chairman Tim Shriver. "United Airlines believes that people with intellectual disabilities should be perceived as they really are: independent, world-class athletes, students, employees, neighbors, travelers, and leaders who contribute to make this world a better place."

Our Service Ambassador program is just one of the many ways Special Olympics has impacted not only our employees, but also our customers. "I see every day how our Service Ambassadors connect with our customers the moment they walk into the airport lobby," said Senior Customer Service Supervisor Steve Suchorabski. "They provide a warm, welcoming smile ad assist in any way they can. To see these young adults hold positions that a society once told them they couldn't is truly the most heartwarming part of my job," Steve continued.

"The opportunity to be a part of the United family means everything to me," Daniel said. "I feel so much pride showing up to work in a Special Olympics/United co-branded uniform, working among such a loving and supportive community. The relationship between these two organizations is truly helping to shape my future while letting me use my gifts of communicating and helping others. Hopefully, I can spend my entire career at United," Daniel added.

In honor of Special Olympics' Global Week of Inclusion in July, we're asking our employees, customers and partners to sign a pledge to #ChooseToInclude at jointherevolution.org/pledge.

And be sure to check out Daniel's podcast The Special Chronicles.

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