One Fine Day: Durham, North Carolina - United Hub

One fine day: Durham, North Carolina

By The Hub team, July 26, 2018

Story by Lauren Vespoli | Rhapsody, Summer 2018

You're in the start-up-filled City of Medicine for business, and you have the day off. Here are the must-hit spots in the hippest corner of the Research Triangle.

9:30 a.m.

Forget grits: Start your morning with a hearty bowl of congee with shiitake mushrooms, Chinese bacon, and mustard greens at Rose's Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets, a former butcher shop turned all-day café and bakery that was on Bon Appétit's Best New Restaurant list in 2014. If you crave something sweet to balance out the savory East Asian–inspired menu, order Chinese crullers with fresh soy milk for dipping, or peruse the pastry case and stow away a coconut Meyer lemon macaron for an afternoon snack.

Macarons at Rose's Noodles, Dumplings & SweetsMacarons at Rose's Noodles, Dumplings & Sweets

10:30 a.m.

Duke University is one of America's most beautiful college campuses, thanks in large part to the splendor of the Sarah P. Duke Gardens. The 55-acre grounds are planted with 2,200 kinds of plants, including 900 species of native Southeastern flora. Make your way to the Italianate Terrace Gardens, designed by acclaimed landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman, or swing by the South Lawn to marvel at the whorls of woven red maple saplings and sweetgum twigs in the Patrick Dougherty sculpture The Big Easy.

Sarah P. Duke GardensSarah P. Duke Gardens

11:30 a.m.

It's a short walk from the gardens to the Nasher Museum of Art, where the university's 13,000-piece art collection is housed in a Modernist building by Uruguayan architect Rafael Viñoly. In the great hall, admire the colorful geometry of Nigerian painter Odili Donald Odita's mural Shadow and Light (For Julian Francis Abele), which pays tribute to the African-American architect who built Duke's chapel. Then visit Solidary & Solitary, a vibrant traveling survey of abstract African-American art from the 1940s to the present.

Nasher Museum of ArtNasher Museum of Art

1:30 p.m.

It's time for some fried chicken. Catch a taxi downtown and take the cobblestone alley jutting off Foster Street to restaurateur Michael Lee's M Kokko. There may already be a line of locals on lunch break, but it's worth the wait for Lee's “KFC": Korean fried chicken wings, which come twice-fried, with your choice of garlic or spicy sauce (watch out for the lingering red chilies). In a perfect meld of Southern and Korean cuisines, the wings are served with kale, prepared collard-greens-style (bacon included), and cubes of pickled daikon radish.

"KFC" wings at M Kokko"KFC" wings at M Kokko

2:30 p.m.

Time for a rest back at your hotel, The Unscripted Durham. The newest arrival on downtown's booming boutique hotel scene (three new properties have opened on this block in the past three years) is a nearly $20 million restoration of the landmark midcentury Jack Tar Motor Lodge, complete with the iconic turquoise facade. The 74 rooms nod to the property's Swinging '60s heyday with playful retro design elements (pendant lamps, trippy geometric wallpaper), but the highlight of the revamp is definitely the rooftop pool. Recline on one of the chaise longues and look out at the skyline until you drift off in the sun.

The rooftop pool at the Unscripted DurhamThe rooftop pool at the Unscripted Durham

6:30 p.m.

Instead of trying to erase its history as a tobacco town, Durham has repurposed the industry's infrastructure at the American Tobacco Campus. The former factory now houses luxury apartments, a start-up incubator, a documentary film theater, and Durham Bulls Athletic Park, the home of the city's minor league team (the subject of Bull Durham). The stadium brews its own beer—try the Baltic Porter, aged with maple-wood baseball bats—and every time the Bulls hit a home run, look out toward the outfield wall, where the Snorting Bull puffs celebratory smoke from its nostrils.

The Old Bull Durham tobacco sign and Lucky Strike TowerThe Old Bull Durham tobacco sign and Lucky Strike Tower

9 p.m.

Duck out of the game a little early for dinner at Counting House at the 21c Museum Hotel, an Art Deco former bank designed by the architects of the Empire State Building. You can't go wrong with the pan-roasted Carolina catch in korma sauce or a series of small plates, such as plancha octopus with potato gnocchi and heirloom squash. Pair your meal with one of the seasonal cocktails, like the Morning Glory (a take on the Negroni with Cocchi Americano, Carpano Bianco, grapefruit, and Peychaud's bitters). After dinner, order another to take with you into the old bank vault and the hotel's 10,500-square-foot contemporary art museum.

Drinks at Counting HouseDrinks at Counting House

Making our app more accessible for people with disabilities

By The Hub team, October 28, 2020

We're proud to launch a redesigned version of our United app to make it easier for customers with visual disabilities to manage all aspects of day-of travel, including check-in, viewing reservation details and flight status, bag tracking and more.

This latest version of our app is now available to both Android and iOS users, and it offers increased color contrast and more space between graphics. Furthermore, we have reorganized how information is displayed and announced to better integrate with screen reader technologies like VoiceOver and TalkBack, which are built into most handheld devices. By restructuring the way the information is organized on the app, screen readers are better able to convert text to audio in the proper, logical sequence, allowing customers to better understand and navigate the app.

United Zoom backgrounds for AvGeeks

By The Hub team, October 27, 2020

Calling all AvGeeks and travelers! Take your next video call from a United Polaris® seat, the cockpit or cruising altitude with United-themed backgrounds for use on Zoom and Microsoft Teams.

Newly added to our collection is a background encouraging our employees and customers to vote. Our mission is to connect people and unite the world — and one of the most important ways to do that is to engage in the democratic process. No matter which party you support, we know our democracy will be stronger if you make your voice heard and vote.

So for your next meeting or catch up with friends and family, download the app to either your computer or mobile device to get started.

Looking back at a landmark year with Special Olympics

By Ryan Wilks, October 19, 2020

Earlier this summer, we shone a light on our flagship partnership with Special Olympics and our commitment to the Inclusion Revolution. In that same story, we introduced you to our four Special Olympics Service Ambassadors, Daniel, Kyle, Lauren and Zinyra (Z), who, this month, celebrate one year working at Chicago O'Hare International Airport as part of the United family.

This groundbreaking, inclusive employment program took off as a part of our ongoing partnership with Special Olympics, a community relationship that employees across the company hold close to heart. The original 'UA4' (as they call themselves) have become an integral part of the United team serving customers at O'Hare Airport. Even from behind their masks, their wide smiles and effervescent spirit exude and bring life to the service culture of excellence we strive towards every day.

"The UA4 are more than just customer service ambassadors. They are shining examples of how inclusion, accessibility and equity can have monumental impacts on the culture and service of a business and community," said Customer Service Managing Director Jonna McGrath. "They have forever changed who we are as a company. While they often talk about how United and this opportunity has changed their lives, they have changed ours in more ways than we can count."

In the two years of partnership with Special Olympics, United employees have volunteered over 10,500 hours of service at events around the world and donated over $1.2 million worth of travel to the organization.

"This inclusive employment program is what community partnerships, like ours with Special Olympics, are all about: collaborating to identify areas where the needs of the community intersect with the cultural and business opportunity, then creating the infrastructure and programming to bring the two together," said Global Community Engagement Managing Director Suzi Cabo. "Through this program, our goal is to show other companies that when you put a committed effort and focus towards inclusion and breaking down barriers, you transform lives. I challenge other business around the world to follow our lead in joining the Inclusion Revolution."

Check out the video below to hear from our Special Olympics Service Ambassadors firsthand.

youtu.be

Scroll to top