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Gliding through rarefied air

By Matt Adams, August 11, 2017

United recognizes and rewards the passion of our employees through the Volunteer Impact Grant program, which has awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars to employees who are giving back to their communities. This story highlights DEN Captain Eric Mosley, one of the many grant recipients who are using those funds for the greater good of the people we serve.

On a warm Saturday in June, against the backdrop of Rocky Mountain National Park's snow-capped peaks, eight intrepid high school students took turns experiencing the thrill of flying in a completely unique way – soaring among the clouds in unpowered glider planes. But it was more than a sense of adventure that drove them from their beds early on a weekend morning; it was a sense of carrying on a legacy that was established nearly 80 years ago by a group of pioneering aviators.

For the past two decades, thanks to the sponsorship of Denver's Hubert L. "Hooks" Jones Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, young men and women from the Denver area have gotten the chance to chase their aeronautical dreams through the Mile High Flight Program, founded by Captain Eric Mosley and his late father, Lieutenant Colonel John W. Mosley. The course, which runs through the school year, exposes kids to aviation in ways that might otherwise be unavailable to them. And each summer it ends on a high note with the highly anticipated glider flights.

"I was sitting at the dinner table with my father and talking about the fact that there were so few African-American pilots in this country," Capt. Mosley said, describing the genesis of the Mile High Flight Program. "We started it as a way to encourage and inspire African-American men and women, but we decided right from the start that we wouldn't discriminate against anyone who wanted to participate. Today we are proud to have students from all races and all backgrounds."

Perhaps no one understood better what those kinds of opportunities could mean to a young person of color than Capt. Mosley's father, who himself had served as one of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II.

Lt. Col. John Mosley, far right, with the original Swoop Club

"Dad had the intention of becoming a veterinarian, but that was denied him because of his race. When the war broke out and they announced the formation of a black fighter squadron in Tuskegee, he decided that if they wouldn't let him be a veterinarian, he'd fly planes. That was the most extreme thing he could imagine as a way to show people what he was capable of doing."

Back at the Owl Canyon Gliderport north of Fort Collins, Colorado, the impact of the Mosleys' vision is evident in the look of exhilaration on the faces of the kids as they climb out of their gliders.

"Flying a glider is almost surreal," said Traye Jackson, a student at Denver's East High School. "You're at the will of the wind when you're up there. You can barely feel anything other than the updrafts."

Not only do the students get exposure to fascinating careers and hobbies, they also have the chance to take inspiration from the men who trained at Tuskegee all those years ago. "Against all odds, they achieved," Jackson said. "Despite everything they went through, they strove to be better than what was expected of them."

Mile High Flight participant Traye with his mother, Lucinda, center. Traye is one of the program\u2019s most promising students

As they prepare to embark upon their twenty-first year, Capt. Mosley and his crew of more than 20 volunteers, which includes three of his fellow United pilots, have built a legacy of their own. The program consists of two phases, and the most promising students are invited to participate in "Phase 2" where they learn to fly while pursuing their private pilot's license. Several Mile High Flight alumni have gone on to study at the Air Force Academy in nearby Colorado Springs, and many more have gone on to careers as pilots in both the military and in commercial aviation at airlines around the country, including current United First Officer Andrea Martinez. Regardless, every student who spent time in the Mile High Flight Program "slipping the surly bonds of Earth," as Capt. Mosley poetically put it, walked away with something of value.

"Even though aviation and aerospace are the focus of our program," Capt. Mosley said, "what we really hope to leave the students with is an absolute, undeniable belief that they can do whatever they want to do, whether it's in the cockpit, whether it's designing jet aircraft, whether it's in the boardroom or the surgical ward – wherever. Aviation is kind of the metaphor, but the message is that through hard work and a good flight plan, there's nothing they can't achieve."

If you live in the Denver area and know a young man or woman with an interest in aviation, you can find more information about the program and the Hubert L. "Hooks" Jones Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen by visiting their website, www.colorado-redtails.com.

Adjusting to Customer Demand, United Adds New Nonstop Service to Florida

By United Newsroom, August 12, 2020

CHICAGO, Aug. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- United Airlines today announced plans to add up to 28 daily nonstop flights this winter connecting customers in Boston, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, New York/LaGuardia, Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio to four popular Florida destinations. The new, nonstop flights reflect United's continuing strategy to aggressively, and opportunistically manage the impact of COVID-19 by increasing service to destinations where customers most want to fly.

Entertainment for all

By The Hub team, August 04, 2020

Our Marketing Inflight Entertainment and Connectivity team and Bridge, our Business Resource Group (BRG) for people with all abilities, partnered together to test and provide feedback on our award-winning seatback inflight entertainment (IFE) system.

Aptly named "Entertainment for all," our new seatback IFE system offers the an extensive suite of accessibility features, allowing for unassisted use by people of all visual, hearing, mobility and language abilities.

"It's nice to know that I can get on a plane and pick my favorite entertainment to enjoy, just like every customer," said Accessibility Senior Analyst and Developer and Bridge Chief of Staff Ray C., who is blind.

"As a deaf employee, the closed captioning availability on board our aircraft is something I value greatly," added Information Technology Analyst Greg O. "The new IFE further cements United's visibility within the deaf community and elsewhere. It makes me proud to be an employee."

Accessibility features of the new IFE include a text-to-speech option, explore by touch, customizable text size, screen magnification, color correction and inversion modes, and alternative navigation options for those unable to swipe or use a handset. For hearing-impaired and non-English-speaking passengers, customization options provide the ability for customers to be served content and receive inflight notifications based on their preferences and settings —with closed captions, with subtitles or in the language of their choice from the 15 languages supported. Our "Entertainment for all" system won the Crystal Cabin Award in 2019, and recently, the Dr. Margaret Pfanstiehl Research and Development Award for Audio Description by the American Council of the Blind.

"This really showed the benefits of partnering with BRGs in helping us improve products and services for our customers and employees," said Inflight Entertainment and Connectivity Senior Manager Corinne S. "Even though we have been recognized with awards for our IFE accessibility features, we are not resting on our laurels but continuing to work towards improving the inflight entertainment experience for all of our customers to ensure entertainment is available for all."

Shaping an inclusive future with Special Olympics

By The Hub team, July 24, 2020

If your travels have taken you through Chicago O'Hare International Airport anytime since October 2019, you may have had a friendly, caring and jovial exchange with Daniel Smrokowski. Daniel is one of four Service Ambassadors thanks to our ongoing partnership with Special Olympics. This inaugural ambassador program aims to provide Special Olympic athletes employment opportunities within our operation, affording them a unique and meaningful career.

Since 2018, our partnership with Special Olympics has become one of United's most cherished relationships, going beyond the events we take part in and volunteer with. While the plane pull competitions, polar plunges, duck derbies and Special Olympics World Games and other events around the world are a big part of our involvement, the heart of this partnership lies with the athletes and individuals supported by Special Olympics. To advocate for their inclusion in every setting is one of our biggest honors, and we take great pride in the role we play in the organization's inclusion revolution.

Aiding in the success of Special Olympics' mission to create continuing opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities, throughout the two-year partnership, United has volunteered over 10,500 hours and donated over $1.2 million in travel to the organization. The impact of this partnership is felt at every level, both at Special Olympics and within our own ranks.

"The Inclusion Revolution campaign, led by our athletes, aims to end discrimination against people with intellectual disabilities. United Airlines has joined in our fight for inclusion, empowering our athletes with the skills needed to succeed and opportunities to contribute their abilities as leaders," said Special Olympics International Chairman Tim Shriver. "United Airlines believes that people with intellectual disabilities should be perceived as they really are: independent, world-class athletes, students, employees, neighbors, travelers, and leaders who contribute to make this world a better place."

Our Service Ambassador program is just one of the many ways Special Olympics has impacted not only our employees, but also our customers. "I see every day how our Service Ambassadors connect with our customers the moment they walk into the airport lobby," said Senior Customer Service Supervisor Steve Suchorabski. "They provide a warm, welcoming smile ad assist in any way they can. To see these young adults hold positions that a society once told them they couldn't is truly the most heartwarming part of my job," Steve continued.

"The opportunity to be a part of the United family means everything to me," Daniel said. "I feel so much pride showing up to work in a Special Olympics/United co-branded uniform, working among such a loving and supportive community. The relationship between these two organizations is truly helping to shape my future while letting me use my gifts of communicating and helping others. Hopefully, I can spend my entire career at United," Daniel added.

In honor of Special Olympics' Global Week of Inclusion in July, we're asking our employees, customers and partners to sign a pledge to #ChooseToInclude at jointherevolution.org/pledge.

And be sure to check out Daniel's podcast The Special Chronicles.

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