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Gliding through rarefied air

By Matt Adams, August 11, 2017

United recognizes and rewards the passion of our employees through the Volunteer Impact Grant program, which has awarded hundreds of thousands of dollars to employees who are giving back to their communities. This story highlights DEN Captain Eric Mosley, one of the many grant recipients who are using those funds for the greater good of the people we serve.

On a warm Saturday in June, against the backdrop of Rocky Mountain National Park's snow-capped peaks, eight intrepid high school students took turns experiencing the thrill of flying in a completely unique way – soaring among the clouds in unpowered glider planes. But it was more than a sense of adventure that drove them from their beds early on a weekend morning; it was a sense of carrying on a legacy that was established nearly 80 years ago by a group of pioneering aviators.

For the past two decades, thanks to the sponsorship of Denver's Hubert L. "Hooks" Jones Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, young men and women from the Denver area have gotten the chance to chase their aeronautical dreams through the Mile High Flight Program, founded by Captain Eric Mosley and his late father, Lieutenant Colonel John W. Mosley. The course, which runs through the school year, exposes kids to aviation in ways that might otherwise be unavailable to them. And each summer it ends on a high note with the highly anticipated glider flights.

"I was sitting at the dinner table with my father and talking about the fact that there were so few African-American pilots in this country," Capt. Mosley said, describing the genesis of the Mile High Flight Program. "We started it as a way to encourage and inspire African-American men and women, but we decided right from the start that we wouldn't discriminate against anyone who wanted to participate. Today we are proud to have students from all races and all backgrounds."

Perhaps no one understood better what those kinds of opportunities could mean to a young person of color than Capt. Mosley's father, who himself had served as one of the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II.

Lt. Col. John Mosley, far right, with the original Swoop Club

"Dad had the intention of becoming a veterinarian, but that was denied him because of his race. When the war broke out and they announced the formation of a black fighter squadron in Tuskegee, he decided that if they wouldn't let him be a veterinarian, he'd fly planes. That was the most extreme thing he could imagine as a way to show people what he was capable of doing."

Back at the Owl Canyon Gliderport north of Fort Collins, Colorado, the impact of the Mosleys' vision is evident in the look of exhilaration on the faces of the kids as they climb out of their gliders.

"Flying a glider is almost surreal," said Traye Jackson, a student at Denver's East High School. "You're at the will of the wind when you're up there. You can barely feel anything other than the updrafts."

Not only do the students get exposure to fascinating careers and hobbies, they also have the chance to take inspiration from the men who trained at Tuskegee all those years ago. "Against all odds, they achieved," Jackson said. "Despite everything they went through, they strove to be better than what was expected of them."

Mile High Flight participant Traye with his mother, Lucinda, center. Traye is one of the program\u2019s most promising students

As they prepare to embark upon their twenty-first year, Capt. Mosley and his crew of more than 20 volunteers, which includes three of his fellow United pilots, have built a legacy of their own. The program consists of two phases, and the most promising students are invited to participate in "Phase 2" where they learn to fly while pursuing their private pilot's license. Several Mile High Flight alumni have gone on to study at the Air Force Academy in nearby Colorado Springs, and many more have gone on to careers as pilots in both the military and in commercial aviation at airlines around the country, including current United First Officer Andrea Martinez. Regardless, every student who spent time in the Mile High Flight Program "slipping the surly bonds of Earth," as Capt. Mosley poetically put it, walked away with something of value.

"Even though aviation and aerospace are the focus of our program," Capt. Mosley said, "what we really hope to leave the students with is an absolute, undeniable belief that they can do whatever they want to do, whether it's in the cockpit, whether it's designing jet aircraft, whether it's in the boardroom or the surgical ward – wherever. Aviation is kind of the metaphor, but the message is that through hard work and a good flight plan, there's nothing they can't achieve."

If you live in the Denver area and know a young man or woman with an interest in aviation, you can find more information about the program and the Hubert L. "Hooks" Jones Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen by visiting their website, www.colorado-redtails.com.

United Cargo operates more than 11,000 cargo-only flights in one year

By The Hub team, March 19, 2021

On March 19, 2020, United operated its first flight carrying cargo without passengers on board. While the passenger cabin was empty, its cargo hold was completely full, carrying more than 29,000 pounds of commodities from Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD) to Frankfurt Airport (FRA).

A year later, United Cargo has operated more than 11,000 cargo-only flights carrying more than 570 million pounds of freight. To support the COVID-19 pandemic recovery efforts, United Cargo has also transported more than 113 million pounds of medical and pharmaceutical products on both cargo-only and passenger flights as well as approximately 10 million COVID-19 vaccines, providing global communities access to the items they have needed most.

10 tips for spring travel

By The Hub team, February 24, 2021

Whether you haven't flown with us for a while or just need a quick refresher before your spring trip, read this list of tips to know before your flight and arrive at the airport travel-ready:

1. Download the United app for contactless bag check, travel assistance and more

Before your flight, download the United app to view your flight status, check in, sign up for flight notifications, locate departure gates, access our free personal device entertainment when available and more. We've also updated our app with new features that can make your trip a little safer, including contactless bag check.

Don't forget to use Agent on Demand for help with any and all questions you may have before your flight. This new capability is available at all our U.S. hub airports and allows you to use your own mobile device to contact a customer service agent via phone, video or chat to help with day-of-travel questions while you're at the airport. Learn more about Agent on Demand here.

United joins UNICEF COVAX initiative

By The Hub team, February 19, 2021

This week, we were honored to become the first U.S. airline to join the UNICEF Humanitarian Airfreight Initiative to combat the COVID-19 pandemic by transporting the vaccine and other critically needed supplies to underserved areas of the globe.

"We are committed to helping the global community in any way we can, and we all must work together to do our part to bring this health and humanitarian crisis to an end," said Director of Cargo Specialty Products Manu Jacobs.

We will leverage our expertise to transport these critical pharmaceutical and healthcare shipments around the world safely, efficiently and expediently. We are proud to partner with the United Nations to support this global effort and provide equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines.

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