Why Savannah Should Be Your Next Southern Getaway - United Hub

Why Savannah should be your next southern getaway

By The Hub team

With its Spanish moss-draped squares and stately antebellum architecture, Savannah oozes Southern charm. But thanks to the recent arrival of chic boutique hotels, edgy art galleries, and celeb chef restaurants, the river town is enjoying a newfound reputation as the South's capital of cool.

Rooted in 300 years of history, Georgia's oldest city has been slow to embrace change (hence its nickname, Slowvannah). There's a fierce pride among residents who don't want massive, multi-million-dollar projects to compete with the city's small-town appeal. And archeologists have raised concerns about the effects of large-scale development on the city's unearthed artifacts and historic sites, which landed on the National Park Service's “Threatened (Priority 1 List)" in March.

In spite of the city's longstanding battle between preservation and progress, the Southern town is soaring in popularity— just take our World's Best list, where readers have rated it one of America's top 10 cities for more than six years straight. In response to the tourism boom, luxury hotel brands, such as Aloft and JW Marriott, are moving in, along with a slew of new restaurants (Husk, anyone?!), galleries, and stores.

Here is what's to come in Savannah's next act.

Husk

Shrimp and grits, collard greens, seafood stew… Lowcountry cuisine is part of Savannah's soul (and stomach). And now, the city's vibrant food scene is finally getting its moment in the spotlight, owing to a wave of new restaurant openings—the most buzz-worthy being an outpost of Sean Brock's lauded Husk. The largest of the four locations, the glam eatery has a distinctly Georgian twist, with a raw bar and regionally inspired fare such as ham cracklin' cornbread with Georgia cane butter.

Perry Lane Hotel

Savannah is in the midst of a massive hotel boom; the city will see the opening of not one, but eight design-forward boutique hotels in the next few months. All eyes are on the much-anticipated Perry Lane Hotel, which debuted earlier this month. The dapper bolthole is a vision in understated elegance, with black-and-white marble floors, rich wood furnishings, roaring fireplaces, and vintage accessories. There are also plenty of slick amenities, including a rooftop pool with a bar and lawn games, a film screening room, a karaoke and arcade area, plus a wine market that offers tastings and cooking classes.

The Grove

Blink and you might think you're in Brooklyn. The Grove, a new three-story dining concept in the heart of the bustling City Market, is lending an air of sophistication to the touristy square. The buzzy bar is done up bright white walls and plush teal seating, but with a terrace overlooking the Savannah skyline, we won't blame you for sitting outside. Your order: spiked sweet tea and the blackened shrimp, served on a bed of spiced turnip greens and gouda grits.

Laney Contemporary Fine Art

Home to the Savannah College of Design and SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah is an arts and culture powerhouse. Reinforcing its creative image is the city's newest art gallery, Laney Contemporary, from gallerist and private art dealer Susan Laney. Located on the outskirts of town, the gallery is well worth the drive to see contemporary photography, paintings, and immersive video installations from the likes of Jack Leigh and Katherine Sandoz.

Plant Riverside District

Hotelier Richard Kessler's $275 million Plant Riverside District is at the forefront of the city's renaissance. The sprawling 4.5-acre entertainment complex, which is housed in and around a restored 1912 industrial power plant, is the biggest private development in Savannah's history. When it opens next spring, it will transform the iconic waterfront, creating 1.5 acres of parks, plazas, and public areas, as well as extending the riverwalk by a quarter-mile. At the heart of the project is a brand new JW Marriott, which will feature three rooftop bars, an art gallery, indie shops, live music venues, natural science exhibits, and more than a dozen restaurants, all spread across three towers.

Artillery

Savannah has always been a popular drinking destination, due to its loose open container laws. Spend a Saturday night along Bay Street, the lively main drag, and you'll spot more than a few pub pedals and boozy bachelorette parties. Looking for a more slightly more sophisticated scene? Try Artillery, an intimate speakeasy housed in an 1896 Venetian Gothic building. Here, the standards are high, from the strict dress code (no flip-flops!) and noise limit (silence your cell phone) to the upscale interiors— all quartz countertops, bronze accents, and chartreuse banquettes. Cheeky tipples like Man The Guns—a mix of high west campfire whiskey, amaro lucano, absinthe, and 18.21 prohibition aromatic bitters—nod to the building's past life as a storehouse for the Georgia Hussars.

Cultural Arts Center

Although Savannah has a thriving arts community, it has noticeably lacked its own dedicated performance space. The $24 million Cultural Arts Center, opening this fall, is set to change that. Spanning 39,000 square feet, the multi-purpose hall will have a 464-seat theater, five crafts studios and classrooms, a small-scale stage, and a gallery. Future events will include rotating art programs and a wide variety of shows, from broadway to ballet.

Eastern Wharf

Just east of downtown, this 57-acre riverfront compound is one of the city's most talked-about developments. The $600 million mixed-use project will feature four residential apartment buildings, seven acres of public parks and squares, a 200-room hotel, plus ample retail and office space. It's estimated to take eight years to finish, but the first phase (with the hotel, apartments, and offices) will be rolled out by 2020.


This article was written by Chelsea Bengier from Travel & Leisure and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Jessica Kimbrough named Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer

By The Hub team, July 10, 2020

Jessica Kimbrough, currently Labor Relations and Legal Strategy Managing Director, will take on the new role of Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer Managing Director.

Jessica assumes this new and expanded position to focus on global inclusion and equity as part of our enhanced commitment to ensure best practices across the business to strengthen our culture.

In this role, Jessica will be responsible for helping United redefine our efforts on diversity, equity and inclusion – ensuring that our programs and approach are strategic, integrated and outcome-oriented, while we continue to build a culture that reflects our core values. She will report to Human Resources and Labor Relations EVP Kate Gebo.

"Jessica's appointment to this role is another critical step our executive team is taking to ensure diversity, equity and inclusion remains a top priority at United," said CEO Scott Kirby. "Given her drive, experience and commitment to champion collaboration and allyship among our employee business resource groups, she is uniquely qualified to take on this position and I look forward to working closely with her."

As Labor Relations and Legal Strategy Managing Director, Jessica worked closely with senior management to create and maintain positive labor relations among our unionized workforce, providing counsel on labor litigation, negotiations, contract administration, organizing issues and managing attorneys who represent United in labor relations. Previously, she served as Labor and Employment Counsel in our legal department.

Jessica has a passion for creating a pipeline of diverse lawyers and leaders, and was honored as one of Chicago Defender's "Women of Excellence" for excellence in her career and civic engagement in 2017. She currently serves as President of uIMPACT, our women's employee business resource group.

Jessica's new role is effective immediately.

United Cargo and logistics partners keep critical medical shipments moving

By The Hub team, July 02, 2020

By working together and strengthening partnerships during these unprecedented times, our global community has overcome challenges and created solutions to keep the global supply chain moving. As COVID-19 continues to disrupt the shipping landscape, United and our industry partners have increasingly demonstrated our commitment to the mission of delivering critical medical supplies across the world.

United Cargo has partnered with DSV Air and Sea, a leading global logistics company, to transport important pharmaceutical materials to places all over the world. One of the items most critical during the current crisis is blood plasma.

Plasma is a fragile product that requires very careful handling. Frozen blood plasma must be kept at a very low, stable temperature of negative 20 degrees Celsius or less – no easy task considering it must be transported between trucks, warehouses and airplanes, all while moving through the climates of different countries. Fortunately, along with our well-developed operational procedures and oversight, temperature-controlled shipping containers from partners like va-Q-tec can help protect these sensitive blood plasma shipments from temperature changes.

A single TWINx shipping container from va-Q-tec can accommodate over 1,750 pounds of temperature-sensitive cargo. Every week, DSV delivers 20 TWINx containers, each one filled to capacity with human blood plasma, for loading onto a Boeing 787-9 for transport. The joint effort to move thousands of pounds of blood plasma demonstrates that despite the distance, challenges in moving temperature-sensitive cargo and COVID-19 obstacles, we continue to find creative solutions with the help of our strong partnerships.

United Cargo is proud to keep the commercial air bridges open between the U.S. and the rest of the world. Since March 19, we have operated over 3,200 cargo-only flights between six U.S. hubs and over 20 cities in Asia, Australia, Europe, South America, India, the Caribbean and the Middle East.

Celebrating Juneteenth

By United Airlines, June 18, 2020

A message from UNITE, United Airlines Multicultural Business Resource Group

Fellow United team members –

Hello from the UNITE leadership team. While we communicate frequently with our 3,500 UNITE members, our platform doesn't typically extend to the entire United family, and we are grateful for the opportunity to share some of our thoughts with all of you.

Tomorrow is June 19. On this day in 1865, shortened long ago to "Juneteenth," Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce that the Civil War had ended and all enslaved individuals were free. For many in the African-American community, particularly in the South, it is recognized as the official date slavery ended in the United States.

Still, despite the end of slavery, the Constitutional promise that "All men are created equal" would overlook the nation's Black citizens for decades to come. It wasn't until nearly a century later that the Civil Rights Act (1964) ended legal segregation and the Voting Rights Act (1965) protected voting rights for Black Americans. But while the nation has made progress, the killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd have made it undeniably clear that we still have a lot of work to do to achieve racial parity and inclusion.

Two weeks ago, Scott and Brett hosted a virtual town hall and set an important example by taking a minute, as Brett said, "to lower my guard, take off my armor, and just talk to you. And talk to you straight from the heart."

Difficult conversations about race and equity are easy to avoid. But everyone needs to have these conversations – speaking honestly, listening patiently and understanding that others' experiences may be different from your own while still a valid reflection of some part of the American experience.

To support you as you consider these conversations, we wanted to share some resources from one of United's partners, The National Museum of African American History and Culture. The museum will host an all-day Virtual Juneteenth Celebration to recognize Juneteenth through presentations, stories, photographs and recipes. The museum also has a portal that United employees can access called Talking About Race, which provides tools and guidance for everyone to navigate conversations about race.

Our mission at UNITE is to foster an inclusive working environment for all of our employees. While we are hopeful and even encouraged by the widespread and diverse show of support for African Americans around the country – and at United - we encourage everyone to spend some time on Juneteenth reflecting on racial disparities that remain in our society and dedicating ourselves to the work that still must be done to fight systemic racism. By honoring how far we've come and honestly acknowledging how far we still must go, we believe United – and the incredible people who are the heart and soul of this airline - can play an important role in building a more fair and just world.

Thank you,

UNITE (United Airlines Multicultural Business Resource Group)

Leadership Team

Scroll to top