The United States of Outdoor Adventure - United Hub
Hemispheres

The United States of adventure

By The Hub team, July 19, 2017

Story by Peter Koch | Hemispheres, June 2017

America has no shortage of natural wonders— or thrill-seekers coming up with the creative ways to conquer them. From waves that ought to come with living wills to trails that hikers literally hang off of, Hemispheres takes a look at 10 of the most extreme adventures the U.S. has to offer.

Angels Landing hiking trail in Zion National Park, Utah.

Most Terrifying Hiking Trail

Angels Landing

Zion National Park, Utah

Towering 1,488 feet above the Virgin River in the heart of Utah's Zion Canyon, Angels Landing, a sheer rock formation so named because “only angels might land upon it," is one of the National Park Service's most popular hikes—and also one of its deadliest. Starting at the river, the 2.5-mile trail winds its way up through Walter's Wiggles—a series of 21 pinball switchbacks—enters the cool confines of Refrigerator Canyon, and then ascends to Scout Outlook, a stunning overlook and the last turnaround point before things get, well, airy. The last half mile climbs more than 400 feet on a narrow, vertigo-inducing spine of (aptly named) slickrock. At points, the trail is only a few feet wide—just enough for one person to tiptoe along at a time—with cliffs dropping nearly 1,000 feet on either side. Those who are brave enough to take hold of the support chains that are bolted to the rock and pull themselves to the top are treated to panoramic, top-of-the-world views of Zion's Martian landscape of soaring red-rock cliffs and sculpted sandstone.

Wildest Sea Kayaking

Channel Islands National Park

Ventura, California

Despite lying just 14 miles off the Central California coast, the five wind-scoured islands that make up Channel Islands National Park have a wild, end-of-the-world feeling that's hard to find anywhere short of the Galápagos. Surrounded as they are by a National Marine Sanctuary, the islands provide a rich habitat for a huge variety of species, including at least seven types of whale, dolphins, sharks, and tens of thousands of seals and sea lions that breed and pup on San Miguel Island each year. Several outfitters offer multiday kayak-camping trips to 96-square-mile Santa Cruz, the largest and most accessible island. There, you can explore kelp forests, paddle into some of the world's largest sea caves, scour pristine tide pools, inspect 10,000-year-old shell mounds left by the ancient Chumash, or hike up to 316-foot-high Cavern Point to spot whales before bedding down for the night to the sound of crashing waves.

Channel Islands National Park in Ventura, CaliforniaChannel Islands

Most Sadistic Obstacle Course

World's Toughest Mudder

Las Vegas

This is the biggest and baddest of the Tough Mudder endurance races. Runners strive to complete as many circuits of the five-mile loop course as possible in 24 hours, with each lap containing 20-plus exhausting obstacles—everything from monkey bars to a challenge that's similar to the board game Operation, complete with electric zaps—plus more than 800 feet of climb-ing and a jump from a 35-foot cliff into hypothermia-inducing Lake Las Vegas (hint: wear a wetsuit), all with night temps that drop below 40 degrees. Just finishing takes grit, but win-ning the $100,000 prize and claiming the title of World's Toughest Mudder requires a commitment bordering on masochism. Each of the top three male finishers last year completed more than 100 miles, and the top female put in 85. Maybe their mudders were mudders…

Most Suicidal Ski Run

Corbet's Couloir

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, Wyoming

Set at the top of 10,450-foot Rendezvous Mountain and named after famed local ski instructor and mountaineer Barry Corbet, this vertiginous double-black-diamond run is the most challenging of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort's legendarily tough trails. Corbet's Couloir is a bucket-list run for countless skiers who, upon peering over its edge and considering their own mortality, very carefully back away. (Hello, performance anxiety!) The crux of the line is the dizzying entrance, which drops anywhere between 10 and 30 feet off a cornice into a tight chute, only to land on a 53-degree slope between steep rock walls. If you manage to stick the landing—and pray that you do, or you're in for a long, embarrassing “yard sale" of a fall—you'll need to execute multiple powerful, technical turns at high speed to make it out safely. Once you're free, though, you can arc big, graceful turns onto the apron of Tensleep Bowl below and add your name to the list of legends.

Rendezvous Mountain in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Rendezvous Mountain

Deepest Canyon Descent

Hells Canyon

Lewiston, Idaho

Hells Canyon isn't America's most famous gorge, but at 7,993 feet, it is the deepest (the Grand Canyon descends 6,093 feet at its lowest point), and a five-day rafting trip down the Snake River offers perhaps the country's best waterborne mix of adventure, natural beauty, and history. The Snake's clear, relatively warm waters yield some of the best whitewater rapids in the Northwest, and its calmer stretches teem with prize rainbow and steelhead trout. From the boat, you'll also get an intimate, ant's-eye view of an impossibly rugged landscape populated by bald eagles, bears, and mountain goats, and short hikes from the banks lead to abandoned century-old homesteader cabins, as well as dozens of Native American pictographs and petroglyphs. All of that merges into a classic Western adventure that's greater than the sum of its parts (and, yes, a river runs through it).

Most Bodacious Bodysurfing Wave

The Wedge

Newport Beach, California

At the Wedge, a powerful shore break off the east end of Newport Beach's Balboa Peninsula, a long jetty relays south swells that form monstrous, wedge-shaped waves, often topping 30 feet during South Pacific storm cycles. They're too steep and unpredictable for surfers at these times—usually summer and fall—but just right for the grizzled local bodysurfers who venture into the frothing chaos in the hope of catching one of these freight-train waves and gliding torpedo-fast down its face. If you're feeling brave, don your fins and dive right into Mother Nature's spin cycle.

Bodysurfing at the Wedge in Newport Beach, California. The Wedge

Highest Place to Hang Out

Telluride Via Ferrata

Telluride, Colorado

Seen from downtown Telluride, the soaring cliffs on the southwest face of 12,785-foot Ajax Peak appear impassable for anyone other than a stunt double from Cliffhanger. But the via ferrata, Italian for “iron road," a trail of cables and iron rungs that cuts across the sheer face, allows anyone the opportunity to traverse the mountain. Well, anyone who's brave enough to clip into a steel cable and shimmy out onto the rungs. To tackle the via ferrata—locals call this one “The Krogerata" after Chuck Kroger, the climber and ironworker who built it—hire a guide service to get you outfitted (with helmet, climbing harness, and clips) and show you the route, which follows old mining trails to a ledge that disappears where the iron starts. From there, it's just you, the iron, and jaw-dropping views of the box canyon below.

Most Crippling Cycling Race

Dirty Kanza 200

Emporia, Kansas

A 200-mile bike race that rattles over the unpaved roads of Kansas's rugged Flint Hills, the Dirty Kanza is as scenic as it is treacherous. The tallgrass-prairie views will take your breath away—if you have any left after pedaling through the heat and wind and over tire-shredding, frame-busting, fist-size chunks of gravel. And god help you if it rains and the roads are churned into a chunky peanut-butter mud that chokes up drivetrains and snaps derailleurs. The full Kanza (there's also a 100-mile “Half Pint" version) is a relentless race against mechanical failure, dehydration, the setting sun, and, in the end, yourself. Anyone who crosses the finish line—only 59 percent of participants did so last year—is a winner.

The unpaved roads of Kansas's rugged Flint HillsThe unpaved roads of Kansas's rugged Flint Hills

Most Surprising Ski Slope

Star Dune

Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve, Colorado

Not all of Colorado's best runs are located among the snowy peaks of Vail and Aspen. In fact, the wide-open slopes of Great Sand Dunes National Park have untracked knee-deep powder that's ripe for the picking—that is, if you trade your snowboard for a sandboard. Yes, sandboarding is a real thing, and this park, with its 170 billion cubic feet of sand, is its unofficial capital. Rent a board—they have extra-slick bases and special wax—at Kristi Mountain Sports in Alamosa, and hike 2.5 miles across a veritable moonscape to 750-foot-tall Star Dune, North America's tallest sandpile. Trudge up to the summit and strap in for a rip-roaring ride in a remote—and unforgettable—setting.

Hardest Day Hike

Cactus to Clouds Trail, San Jacinto Peak

Palm Springs, California

It's not simply the height of 10,834-foot San Jacinto Peak that makes it America's toughest day hike (Mount Whitney, after all, is almost 4,000 feet taller). What's really killer about the Cactus to Clouds Trail is that it climbs nearly all of its 10,300 feet from the floor of the Coachella Valley in just 14 miles. It doesn't help that the trail starts in the searing desert—with no water available for the first 10 hours or so—and ends at an elevation where it can snow year-round. Hikers often set out in the predawn darkness to beat the heat, which makes route-finding a challenge on the mountain's lower flanks. Is it worth the trouble? Just ask John Muir, who wrote, “The view from San Jacinto is the most sublime spectacle to be found anywhere on this earth!" Reach the top and you'll have earned that view—and a ride home on the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway.

Looking back at a landmark year with Special Olympics

By Ryan Wilks, October 19, 2020

Earlier this summer, we shone a light on our flagship partnership with Special Olympics and our commitment to the Inclusion Revolution. In that same story, we introduced you to our four Special Olympics Service Ambassadors, Daniel, Kyle, Lauren and Zinyra (Z), who, this month, celebrate one year working at Chicago O'Hare International Airport as part of the United family.

This groundbreaking, inclusive employment program took off as a part of our ongoing partnership with Special Olympics, a community relationship that employees across the company hold close to heart. The original 'UA4' (as they call themselves) have become an integral part of the United team serving customers at O'Hare Airport. Even from behind their masks, their wide smiles and effervescent spirit exude and bring life to the service culture of excellence we strive towards every day.

"The UA4 are more than just customer service ambassadors. They are shining examples of how inclusion, accessibility and equity can have monumental impacts on the culture and service of a business and community," said Customer Service Managing Director Jonna McGrath. "They have forever changed who we are as a company. While they often talk about how United and this opportunity has changed their lives, they have changed ours in more ways than we can count."

In the two years of partnership with Special Olympics, United employees have volunteered over 10,500 hours of service at events around the world and donated over $1.2 million worth of travel to the organization.

"This inclusive employment program is what community partnerships, like ours with Special Olympics, are all about: collaborating to identify areas where the needs of the community intersect with the cultural and business opportunity, then creating the infrastructure and programming to bring the two together," said Global Community Engagement Managing Director Suzi Cabo. "Through this program, our goal is to show other companies that when you put a committed effort and focus towards inclusion and breaking down barriers, you transform lives. I challenge other business around the world to follow our lead in joining the Inclusion Revolution."

Check out the video below to hear from our Special Olympics Service Ambassadors firsthand.

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Spotlighting our own during Hispanic Heritage Month

By The Hub team, October 13, 2020

We celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 th through October 15th and take the time to recognize the important contributions of our colleagues of Hispanic descent in the United family.

This year, we hosted virtual events organized by our multicultural business resource group UNITE to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, covering topics ranging from immigration reform to Hispanic leadership. We're also taking a moment to highlight Latinx employees nominated by their peers for their contributions both at and outside of work.

These nominees have demonstrated leadership in their position and through their character. Take a moment to read their own words about how their background and heritage plays a role in the way they interact with customers, in how they support their colleagues and why it brings valuable perspective to their work.

Vania Wit – VP & Deputy Counsel

Photo of Vania Wit, VP & Deputy Counsel for United Airlines

"I am the Vice President and Deputy General Counsel in the legal department. I am an attorney and have worked in the legal department for over 21 years and am currently responsible for a number of different legal areas – such as litigation, international, commercial and government contracts, labor, employment and benefits, antitrust. I have the privilege of working with a tremendous team of attorneys who are directly leading and managing these areas. One of the things I like most about my job is simply getting to know the backgrounds and personal stories that everyone has about their paths to United or their passion for the industry. Being the daughter of immigrants from South America and growing up in a family who relies heavily on air travel to connect us to our close family and friends is an integral part of my story and what drew me to this industry and this company."

Kayra Martinez – International Flight Attendant, FRA

Photo of Kayra Martinez on board an aircraft

"I love that my work as a flight attendant brings me all over the world and allows me to connect with diverse people across the globe. Because of my Spanish heritage, I've been able to use my language as a way to connect with passengers, crew members and people from every nationality. In addition, my heritage gives me a very close connection to family, creating community and using inclusion as a way to bring people together. After transferring to Europe, I was able to study German, more Spanish, Italian and Arabic. Outside of work, I'm the director and founder of a nonprofit organization that empowers refugees through art. Hundreds of children and adults fleeing war-torn countries have found healing through my art workshops. These refugees are currently displaced in Greece. Their stunning paintings are then sold in art galleries and communities around the world, raising awareness and putting income directly into the hands of refugee artists."

Adriana Carmona – Program Manager, AO Regulatory Compliance

Photo of Adriana standing in front of a plane engine

"I've been incredibly lucky to have amazing leaders during my time at United who have challenged me from day one to think outside the box, step out of my comfort zone and trusted me to own and deliver on the tasks assigned. I think this sense of ownership is largely shaped by my Latino background, which values responsibility, respect and accountability and taking full charge of what's in your control to be able to deliver accordingly."

Harry Cabrera – Assistant Manager, AO Customer Service, IAH

Photo of Harry Cabrera

"My desire to help people is what drove me to start my career in Customer Service over two decades ago. Currently I provide support to our coworkers and customers at IAH , the gateway to Latin America and the Caribbean. As a Colombian native celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month, I'm proud to see the strength that my fellow Latinos forge every day at United Airlines. Family values are a cornerstone of the Latin community; I consider my coworkers to be part of my extended family. Mentor support throughout the years gave me the opportunity to grow professionally. The desire to do better and help others succeed is part of that heritage. I collaborate with our Latin American operations and create ways to improve performance. No matter what language you speak, the passion for what you do and being approachable makes the difference in any interaction."

Juciaria Meadows – Assistant Regional Manager, Cargo Sales

Photo of Juciaria Meadows in a Cargo hold

"During my 28-year career, I've worked across the system in various frontline and leadership roles in Reservations, Customer Service and Passenger Sales in Brazil. I moved to the U.S. in 2012 to work as an Account Executive for Cargo. It did not take too long for me to learn that boxes and containers have as much a voice as a passenger sitting in our aircraft. My job is to foster relationships with shippers, freight forwarders, cosignees, etc. and build strong partnerships in fair, trustworthy and caring ways where United Cargo will be their carrier of choice. That's where my background growing up in a Latino family plays an important role in my day-to-day interactions. I've done many wonderful sales trainings provided by United and my academic background , but none of them taught me more than watching my parents running their wholesale food warehouse. Developing exceptional relationships with their customers, they always treated them with trust and respect. They were successful business people with a big heart, creative, always adding a personal touch to their business relationships and I find myself doing the same. It's a lesson that is deep in my heart."

Shanell Arevalo – Customer Service Representative, DEN

Photo of Shanell Arevalo at work

"I am Belizean and Salvadoran. At a young age my family moved to California from Belize. Although I grew up in the United States , one thing my parents taught me was to never forget the culture, values and principles I was raised on. This includes showing love, compassion, and respect to all people. We learned to put our best foot forward for any situation and always put our heart and mind into everything we do. In my position as a customer service agent, it's the difference of showing the love, compassion and respect to our passengers to show that this is not just a job but rather a passion of genuinely caring for our people. Being Latina, we are raised to always take care of our family, and the way I take care of passengers is the way I would take care of my family. If there's one way I know I can make a difference with our Spanish speaking passengers, it's being able to speak the language. The glow that comes over a passenger's face when they realize there's someone who can speak Spanish is absolutely an indescribable feeling. With that glow comes comfort and joy. The small comfort they get from knowing someone can connect with them makes all the difference in their experience."

Around the web

United Cargo responds to COVID-19 challenges, prepares for what's next

By The Hub team, September 30, 2020

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, United Cargo has supported a variety of customers within the healthcare industry for over 10 years. Three key solutions – TempControl, LifeGuard and QuickPak – protect the integrity of vital shipments such as precision medicine, pharmaceuticals, biologics, medical equipment and vaccines. By utilizing processes like temperature monitoring, thermodynamic management, and priority boarding and handling, United Cargo gives customers the peace of mind that their shipments will be protected throughout their journey.

With the global demand for tailored pharmaceutical solutions at an all-time high, we've made investments to help ensure we provide the most reliable air cargo options for cold chain shipping. In April this year, we became the first U.S. carrier to lease temperature-controlled shipping containers manufactured by DoKaSch Temperature Solutions. We continue to partner with state-of-the-art container providers to ensure we have options that meet our customers' ever-changing needs.

"Providing safe air cargo transport for essential shipments has been a top priority since the pandemic began. While the entire air cargo industry has had its challenges, I'm proud of how United Cargo has adapted and thrived despite a significant reduction in network capacity and supply," said United Cargo President Jan Krems. "We remain committed to helping our customers make it through the pandemic, as well as to doing everything we can to be prepared for the COVID-19 vaccine distribution when the time comes."

Our entire team continues to prioritize moving critical shipments as part of our commitment to supporting the global supply chain. We've assembled a COVID readiness task team to ensure we have the right people in place and are preparing our airports as we get ready for the industry-wide effort that comes next.

In cooperation with our partners all over the world, United Cargo has helped transport nearly 145 million pounds of medical supplies to aid in the fight against COVID-19, using a combination of cargo-only flights and passenger flig­hts. To date, United Cargo has operated more than 6,300 cargo-only flights and has transported more than 213 million pounds of cargo worldwide.

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