The United States of Outdoor Adventure - United Hub
Hemispheres

The United States of adventure

By The Hub team , July 19, 2017

Story by Peter Koch | Hemispheres, June 2017

America has no shortage of natural wonders— or thrill-seekers coming up with the creative ways to conquer them. From waves that ought to come with living wills to trails that hikers literally hang off of, Hemispheres takes a look at 10 of the most extreme adventures the U.S. has to offer.

Angels Landing hiking trail in Zion National Park, Utah.

Most Terrifying Hiking Trail

Angels Landing

Zion National Park, Utah

Towering 1,488 feet above the Virgin River in the heart of Utah's Zion Canyon, Angels Landing, a sheer rock formation so named because “only angels might land upon it," is one of the National Park Service's most popular hikes—and also one of its deadliest. Starting at the river, the 2.5-mile trail winds its way up through Walter's Wiggles—a series of 21 pinball switchbacks—enters the cool confines of Refrigerator Canyon, and then ascends to Scout Outlook, a stunning overlook and the last turnaround point before things get, well, airy. The last half mile climbs more than 400 feet on a narrow, vertigo-inducing spine of (aptly named) slickrock. At points, the trail is only a few feet wide—just enough for one person to tiptoe along at a time—with cliffs dropping nearly 1,000 feet on either side. Those who are brave enough to take hold of the support chains that are bolted to the rock and pull themselves to the top are treated to panoramic, top-of-the-world views of Zion's Martian landscape of soaring red-rock cliffs and sculpted sandstone.

Wildest Sea Kayaking

Channel Islands National Park

Ventura, California

Despite lying just 14 miles off the Central California coast, the five wind-scoured islands that make up Channel Islands National Park have a wild, end-of-the-world feeling that's hard to find anywhere short of the Galápagos. Surrounded as they are by a National Marine Sanctuary, the islands provide a rich habitat for a huge variety of species, including at least seven types of whale, dolphins, sharks, and tens of thousands of seals and sea lions that breed and pup on San Miguel Island each year. Several outfitters offer multiday kayak-camping trips to 96-square-mile Santa Cruz, the largest and most accessible island. There, you can explore kelp forests, paddle into some of the world's largest sea caves, scour pristine tide pools, inspect 10,000-year-old shell mounds left by the ancient Chumash, or hike up to 316-foot-high Cavern Point to spot whales before bedding down for the night to the sound of crashing waves.

Channel Islands National Park in Ventura, CaliforniaChannel Islands

Most Sadistic Obstacle Course

World's Toughest Mudder

Las Vegas

This is the biggest and baddest of the Tough Mudder endurance races. Runners strive to complete as many circuits of the five-mile loop course as possible in 24 hours, with each lap containing 20-plus exhausting obstacles—everything from monkey bars to a challenge that's similar to the board game Operation, complete with electric zaps—plus more than 800 feet of climb-ing and a jump from a 35-foot cliff into hypothermia-inducing Lake Las Vegas (hint: wear a wetsuit), all with night temps that drop below 40 degrees. Just finishing takes grit, but win-ning the $100,000 prize and claiming the title of World's Toughest Mudder requires a commitment bordering on masochism. Each of the top three male finishers last year completed more than 100 miles, and the top female put in 85. Maybe their mudders were mudders…

Most Suicidal Ski Run

Corbet's Couloir

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, Wyoming

Set at the top of 10,450-foot Rendezvous Mountain and named after famed local ski instructor and mountaineer Barry Corbet, this vertiginous double-black-diamond run is the most challenging of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort's legendarily tough trails. Corbet's Couloir is a bucket-list run for countless skiers who, upon peering over its edge and considering their own mortality, very carefully back away. (Hello, performance anxiety!) The crux of the line is the dizzying entrance, which drops anywhere between 10 and 30 feet off a cornice into a tight chute, only to land on a 53-degree slope between steep rock walls. If you manage to stick the landing—and pray that you do, or you're in for a long, embarrassing “yard sale" of a fall—you'll need to execute multiple powerful, technical turns at high speed to make it out safely. Once you're free, though, you can arc big, graceful turns onto the apron of Tensleep Bowl below and add your name to the list of legends.

Rendezvous Mountain in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Rendezvous Mountain

Deepest Canyon Descent

Hells Canyon

Lewiston, Idaho

Hells Canyon isn't America's most famous gorge, but at 7,993 feet, it is the deepest (the Grand Canyon descends 6,093 feet at its lowest point), and a five-day rafting trip down the Snake River offers perhaps the country's best waterborne mix of adventure, natural beauty, and history. The Snake's clear, relatively warm waters yield some of the best whitewater rapids in the Northwest, and its calmer stretches teem with prize rainbow and steelhead trout. From the boat, you'll also get an intimate, ant's-eye view of an impossibly rugged landscape populated by bald eagles, bears, and mountain goats, and short hikes from the banks lead to abandoned century-old homesteader cabins, as well as dozens of Native American pictographs and petroglyphs. All of that merges into a classic Western adventure that's greater than the sum of its parts (and, yes, a river runs through it).

Most Bodacious Bodysurfing Wave

The Wedge

Newport Beach, California

At the Wedge, a powerful shore break off the east end of Newport Beach's Balboa Peninsula, a long jetty relays south swells that form monstrous, wedge-shaped waves, often topping 30 feet during South Pacific storm cycles. They're too steep and unpredictable for surfers at these times—usually summer and fall—but just right for the grizzled local bodysurfers who venture into the frothing chaos in the hope of catching one of these freight-train waves and gliding torpedo-fast down its face. If you're feeling brave, don your fins and dive right into Mother Nature's spin cycle.

Bodysurfing at the Wedge in Newport Beach, California. The Wedge

Highest Place to Hang Out

Telluride Via Ferrata

Telluride, Colorado

Seen from downtown Telluride, the soaring cliffs on the southwest face of 12,785-foot Ajax Peak appear impassable for anyone other than a stunt double from Cliffhanger. But the via ferrata, Italian for “iron road," a trail of cables and iron rungs that cuts across the sheer face, allows anyone the opportunity to traverse the mountain. Well, anyone who's brave enough to clip into a steel cable and shimmy out onto the rungs. To tackle the via ferrata—locals call this one “The Krogerata" after Chuck Kroger, the climber and ironworker who built it—hire a guide service to get you outfitted (with helmet, climbing harness, and clips) and show you the route, which follows old mining trails to a ledge that disappears where the iron starts. From there, it's just you, the iron, and jaw-dropping views of the box canyon below.

Most Crippling Cycling Race

Dirty Kanza 200

Emporia, Kansas

A 200-mile bike race that rattles over the unpaved roads of Kansas's rugged Flint Hills, the Dirty Kanza is as scenic as it is treacherous. The tallgrass-prairie views will take your breath away—if you have any left after pedaling through the heat and wind and over tire-shredding, frame-busting, fist-size chunks of gravel. And god help you if it rains and the roads are churned into a chunky peanut-butter mud that chokes up drivetrains and snaps derailleurs. The full Kanza (there's also a 100-mile “Half Pint" version) is a relentless race against mechanical failure, dehydration, the setting sun, and, in the end, yourself. Anyone who crosses the finish line—only 59 percent of participants did so last year—is a winner.

The unpaved roads of Kansas's rugged Flint HillsThe unpaved roads of Kansas's rugged Flint Hills

Most Surprising Ski Slope

Star Dune

Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve, Colorado

Not all of Colorado's best runs are located among the snowy peaks of Vail and Aspen. In fact, the wide-open slopes of Great Sand Dunes National Park have untracked knee-deep powder that's ripe for the picking—that is, if you trade your snowboard for a sandboard. Yes, sandboarding is a real thing, and this park, with its 170 billion cubic feet of sand, is its unofficial capital. Rent a board—they have extra-slick bases and special wax—at Kristi Mountain Sports in Alamosa, and hike 2.5 miles across a veritable moonscape to 750-foot-tall Star Dune, North America's tallest sandpile. Trudge up to the summit and strap in for a rip-roaring ride in a remote—and unforgettable—setting.

Hardest Day Hike

Cactus to Clouds Trail, San Jacinto Peak

Palm Springs, California

It's not simply the height of 10,834-foot San Jacinto Peak that makes it America's toughest day hike (Mount Whitney, after all, is almost 4,000 feet taller). What's really killer about the Cactus to Clouds Trail is that it climbs nearly all of its 10,300 feet from the floor of the Coachella Valley in just 14 miles. It doesn't help that the trail starts in the searing desert—with no water available for the first 10 hours or so—and ends at an elevation where it can snow year-round. Hikers often set out in the predawn darkness to beat the heat, which makes route-finding a challenge on the mountain's lower flanks. Is it worth the trouble? Just ask John Muir, who wrote, “The view from San Jacinto is the most sublime spectacle to be found anywhere on this earth!" Reach the top and you'll have earned that view—and a ride home on the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway.

Reflecting on Veterans Day: a message from our CEO Oscar Munoz

By Oscar Munoz, CEO, United Airlines , November 11, 2019

Right now, around the world, brave members of America's armed forces are on duty, defending our freedom and upholding our values.

When not laser-focused on the mission at hand, they're looking forward to the day when their service to our nation is fulfilled and they can reunite with their families.

They are also imagining how they can use their hard-earned skills to build an exciting, rewarding and important career when they return home.

I want them to look no further than United Airlines.

That's why we are focused on recruiting, developing and championing veterans across our company, demonstrating to our returning women and men in uniform that United is the best possible place for them to put their training, knowledge, discipline and character to the noblest use.

They've developed their knowledge and skills in some of the worst of times. We hope they will use those skills to keep United performing at our best, all of the time.

That's why we are accelerating our efforts to onboard the best and the brightest, and substantially increasing our overall recruitment numbers each year.

We recently launched a new sponsorship program to support onboarding veterans into United and a new care package program to support deployed employees. It's one more reason why United continues to rank high - and rise higher - as a top workplace for veterans. In fact, we jumped 21 spots this year on Indeed.com's list of the top U.S workplaces for veterans. This is a testament to our increased recruiting efforts, as well as our efforts to create a culture where veterans feel valued and supported.

We use the special reach and resources of our global operations to partner with outstanding organizations. This is our way of stepping up and going the extra mile for all those who've stepped forward to answer our nation's call.

We do this year-round, and the month of November is no exception; however, it is exceptional, especially as we mark Veterans Day.

As we pay tribute to all Americans who have served in uniform and carried our flag into battle throughout our history, let's also keep our thoughts with the women and men who are serving around the world, now. They belong to a generation of post-9/11 veterans who've taken part in the longest sustained period of conflict in our history.

Never has so much been asked by so many of so few.... for so long. These heroes represent every color and creed. They are drawn from across the country and many immigrated to our shores.

They then freely choose to serve in the most distant and dangerous regions of the world, to protect democracy in its moments of maximum danger.

Wherever they serve - however they serve - whether they put on a uniform each day, or serve in ways which may never be fully known, these Americans wake up each morning willing to offer the "last full measure of devotion" on our behalf.

Every time they do so, they provide a stunning rebuke to the kinds of voices around the world who doubt freedom and democracy's ability to defend itself.

Unfortunately, we know there are those who seem to not understand – or say they do not - what it is that inspires a free people to step forward, willing to lay down their lives so that their country and fellow citizens might live.

But, we – who are both the wards and stewards of the democracy which has been preserved and handed down to us by veterans throughout our history – do understand.

We know that inciting fear and hatred of others is a source of weakness, not strength. And such divisive rhetoric can never inspire solidarity or sacrifice like love for others and love of country can.

It is this quality of devotion that we most honor in our veterans - those who have served, do serve and will serve.

On behalf of a grateful family of 96,000, thank you for your service.

Humbly,

Oscar

United named a top workplace for veterans

By The Hub team , November 10, 2019

Each year around Veterans Day, Indeed, one of the world's largest job search engines, rates companies based on actual employee reviews to identify which ones offer the best opportunities and benefits for current and former U.S. military members. Our dramatic improvement in the rankings this year reflects a stronger commitment than ever before to actively recruiting, developing and nurturing veteran talent.

"We've spent a lot of time over the past 12 months looking for ways to better connect with our employees who served and attract new employees from the military ranks," said Global Catering Operations and Logistics Managing Director Ryan Melby, a U.S. Army veteran and the president of our United for Veterans business resource group.

"Our group is launching a mentorship program, for instance, where we'll assign existing employee-veterans to work with new hires who come to us from the armed forces. Having a friend and an ally like that, someone who can help you translate the skills you picked up in the military to what we do as a civilian company, is invaluable. That initiative is still in its infancy, but I'm really optimistic about what it can do for United and for our veteran population here."

Impressively, we were the only one of our industry peers to move up on the list, further evidence that we're on a good track as a company.

Mission Accomplished

By Matt Adams , November 06, 2019

The question of where David Ferrari was had haunted retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Vincent Salceto for the better part of 66 years.

Rarely did a week go by that Salceto didn't think about his old friend. Often, he relived their last moments together in a recurring nightmare. In it, it's once again 1953 and Salceto and Ferrari are patrolling a valley in what is now North Korea. Suddenly, explosions shatter the silence and flares light up the night sky.

Crouching under a barrage of bullets, Salceto, the squad's leader, drags two of his men to safety, then he sees Ferrari lying face down on the ground. He runs out to help him, but he's too late. And that's when he always wakes up.

Italian Americans from opposite coasts – Salceto from Philadelphia, Ferrari from San Francisco – the two became close, almost like brothers, after being assigned to the same unit during the Korean War. When Ferrari died, it hit Salceto hard.

"After that, I never let anyone get close to me like I did with Dave," he says. "I couldn't; I didn't want to go through that again."

When the war ended, Salceto wanted to tell Ferrari's family how brave their son and brother had been in battle. Most of all, he wanted to salute his friend at his gravesite and give him a proper farewell.

For decades, though, Salceto had no luck finding his final resting place or locating any of his relatives. Then, in June of this year, he uncovered a clue that led him to the Italian Cemetary in Colma, California, where Ferrari is buried.

Within days, Salceto, who lives in Franklinville, New Jersey, was packed and sitting aboard United Flight 731 from Philadelphia to San Francisco with his wife, Amy, and daughter, Donna Decker, on his way to Colma. For such a meaningful trip, he even wore his Army dress uniform.

That's how San Francisco-based flight attendant Noreen Baldwin spotted him as he walked down the jet bridge to get on the plane.

"I saw him and said to the other crew members, 'Oh my goodness, look at this guy,'" she says. "I knew there had to be a story."

The two struck up a conversation and Salceto told Baldwin why he was traveling. She got emotional listening to him talk and made a point of fussing over him, making sure he and his family had everything they needed.

About halfway through the flight, Baldwin had an idea. She and her fellow crew members would write messages of encouragement to Salceto and invite his fellow passengers to do the same.

"We did it discreetly," says Baldwin. "I asked the customers if they saw the man in uniform, which most had, and asked them if they wanted to write a few words for him on a cocktail napkin. A lot of people did; families did it together, parents got their kids to write something. After the first few rows, I was so choked up that I could barely talk."

When Baldwin surprised Salceto with dozens of hand-written notes, he, too, was speechless. He laid the stack on his lap and read each one. At the same time, the pilots made an announcement about the veteran over the loud speaker, after which the customers on board burst into applause.

"It seems contrived, and I hate using the word organic, but that's what it was; it just happened," Baldwin says. "Mr. Salceto was so loveable and humble, and what he was doing was so incredible, it felt like the right thing to do. And you could tell he was touched."

On June 27, Salceto finally stood before Ferrari's grave and said that long-awaited goodbye. As a trumpeter played "Taps," he unpinned a medal from his jacket and laid it reverently on the headstone.

"I had gotten a Bronze Star for my actions [the night Ferrari died] with a 'V' for valor, and that was the medal I put on Dave's grave," says Salceto, pausing to fight back tears. "I thought he was more deserving of it than I was."

For the first time in years, Salceto felt at peace. His mission was accomplished.

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