From Bangkok to Koh Kood: Two Weeks in the Land of Smiles - United Hub
Amazing destination

From Bangkok to Koh Kood: Two weeks in the Land of Smiles

By Nick Harper

A record number of tourists visited Thailand in 2018, more than 38 million lured by the promise of heavenly beaches and glorious cuisine, historic shrines and glittering temples. Even more are expected in 2019, making Thailand the most popular travel destination in Asia. If you've already visited the "Land of Smiles," you'll understand why. If you haven't, it might be time to plan your visit.

With so much to see, do and experience, it can be hard to know where to start. But to help, we've created a first-timer's guide to Thailand, covering the key places to visit over 14 glorious days.

Wat Pho Temple in Bangkok, Thailand at sunset

Two days in Bangkok

Fly into Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport (BKK), which sits 18 miles east of the city.

What started out as a small trading center and port on the west banks of the Chao Phraya River 200 years ago is now one of the world's most densely populated cities, a land of towering skyscrapers and gleaming temples.

Venture onto the backpackers' beloved Khaosan Road to witness east and west collide. Look beyond to The Grand Palace, the Temple of Dawn and the giant reclining Buddha of Wat Pho. Slurp noodles and coconut juice among the city's floating market stalls, get ringside seats for brutal but balletic Muay Thai, and take a tuk tuk (auto rickshaw) to the astonishing Chatuchak Weekend Market, where 8,000 market stalls sell everything imaginable and more.

And if time allows, take a tour to the infamous River Kwai Bridge in Kanchanaburi, about 80 miles to the west of Bangkok. The bridge and Kanchanaburi War Cemetery offer a poignant reminder of those who lost their lives during World War II.

Two days in Bangkok works well: fly in, shake off your jet lag and familiarize yourself with a new country. Then we suggest you escape the crowds and chaos by heading north of the city.

Buddha statues in a long hallway in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand

Two days around Phitsanulok

Take a slow-but-enjoyable train ride north to Phitsanulok, the sleepy but attractive provincial capital that sits 249 miles north of Bangkok and 186 miles south of Chiang Mai. While Phitsanulok is pleasant enough for a night, the main reason to stay here is to visit the nearby UNESCO World Heritage City of Sukhothai, an hour's drive west.

The first capital of Siam, Sukhothai was the cradle of Thai civilization and is considered to be the birthplace of Thai art, architecture and language. Today it's home to a vast array of historical sites and temple ruins that will fill your phone and Instagram feed. Eat at the homely Ban Mai, stay the night at Yodia Heritage Hotel, then fly the hour north to Chiang Mai the following morning.

If you prefer to stay in Bangkok and want a similar experience, take a day trip to Ayutthaya and the ruins of the old city in Ayutthaya Historical Park. Expect larger crowds as a result of its proximity to the capital. Upon your return to Bangkok, fly the hour north to Chiang Mai.

Temple in Chiang Mai, Thailand

Three days in Chiang Mai

Around 435 miles north of Bangkok stands Thailand's second city – its name translating as 'new city'.

While Bangkok squeezes in nine million people, Chiang Mai is home to around 200,000 people, and life shuffles by at a more sedate pace here. Set in a verdant valley on the banks of the Ping River, the city was founded in 1296 as a walled city surrounded by a moat.

Today, with both city and moat remaining, past and present weave seamlessly together. The old city and temples at the city's heart retain the atmosphere of an ancient village while the new city boasts modern buildings rising up around it.

Historic temples, museums, handicraft shops and the night (and day) markets are essential stops while day-long cooking courses allow you to master several Thai specialties — and give you an excuse to slurp hot and sour soup for breakfast.

When in Chiang Mai, you really should take an adventure tour in the jungles north of the city. Elephant trekking, cycling, kayaking, white water rafting and zip-lining through the canopy of the jungle are just a few of the options, with 200-plus companies offering an adventure to suit every appetite.

After all that exertion, you may need a beach. Luckily, the paradise island of Phuket is an easy two-hour flight south.

A boat sits in the water on a beach in Phuket, Thailand

Three days in Phuket

Thailand's largest and busiest island is joined to the mainland by a bridge that supplies a steady stream of tourists, and it's easy to see why. The "Pearl of the Andaman" is the Thai island of your imagination, with the powdery-white beaches and shimmering turquoise sea you've been dreaming of, but it's also so much more.

Phuket has it all — a six-star resort with your own private butler, designer boutiques, world-class celebrity-chef restaurants and nightlife to take you from dusk until dawn. In addition, you'll find major temples, wildlife sanctuaries and national parks. Not to mention world-class diving and snorkeling at nearby Ko Similan. Phuket ticks every box and is almost everything you'd imagine it to be.

At the heart of it all is an island of staggeringly beautiful beaches. The busiest and most developed stretch are along Phuket's southwest coast at Patong, Karon and Kata, with lower key alternatives scattered further north at Layan, Surin and Bangtao, while the hidden secrets of Banana Rock and Nui Beach reward those who venture off the beaten track.

At this point you have a choice. Either stay as long on Phuket as your time allows before flying back to Bangkok, or fly five hours north-east to Trat, hop across to Koh Chang and turn the relaxation levels down even further.

White sand beach in Koh Chang, Thailand

Three days on Koh Chang

Koh Changis one of Thailand's most laid-back and relatively untouched islands. Its west coast has succumbed to development around its main beaches, but head south or along the east coast and you'll uncover a low-key experience, with small, mostly family-run hotels and guest houses, yoga and spa resorts, and traditional Thai fishing villages.

You could happily stay here forever. But if Koh Chang somehow feels too crowded, hop on a passenger-only boat to Koh Kood — a smaller, even quieter version of the island you're leaving behind. Koh Kood brings you the beaches, the mountain jungles, the low-key bungalows and the ultra-luxurious resorts, but with very few tourists to spoil your view. You won't quite have the island to yourself, it will just feel that way.

You won't want to leave, but you can't stay forever. So, to complete your vacation, we suggest you head back to where it all began.

Woman at a rooftop bar overlooking the skyline of Bangkok

One final night in Bangkok

If you are visiting Bangkok for the first time, returning for a night at the end of your vacation will allow you to appreciate the city without the jet lag or the sense of mild bewilderment. Enjoy one final night before flying out of Suvarnabhumi Airport.

When to visit:Aim for between November and early April, the driest period of the year and also the warmest, with temperatures in the upper 80s to mid 90s and up to nine hours of sunshine daily. Thailand's rainy months are between March and October. It's still beautifully warm, but you should expect sudden and often heavy rain showers. To avoid the crowds, visit between May and September, the quietest period of the year when temperatures and prices are a little lower.

United flies to Hong Kong, which can be a stepping stone to everything Thailand has to offer. From Hong Kong, you can fly with one of our Star Alliance member airlines. For more details and to start your adventure, visit united.comor use the United mobile app.

Celebrating immigration perspectives and diverse journeys

By The Hub team, September 25, 2020

From Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, the U.S. celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month, a chance to pay tribute to the history, culture and contributions that generations of Latinxs have paved to enrich U.S. history. It is also a reminder to celebrate our differences and spark difficult, yet important, conversations.

To kick off the month, UNITE, our multicultural business resource group for employees, did just that by hosting a panel discussion about the immigrant experience and what it means to be an immigrant in the U.S.

United Litigation and Managing Counsel Elizabeth Lopez, who is a pro bono immigration attorney, moderated the panel, and was joined by Ashley Huebner, Associate Director of Legal Services at the National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) and Magdalena Gonzalez, Program Manager, Leadership Development Programs at Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement. The three women shared their insights and personal stories, while addressing some misconceptions and highlighting the contributions of immigrants to our company and country.

Participants' headshots from United's Hispanic Heritage Month Panel From left to right, Elizabeth Lopez, Ashely Huebner and Magdalena Gonzalez

"I started to notice that there were things I was scared of doing, that I needed to be cautious," said Magdalena while sharing her personal experience as a DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipient. "My friends, who a majority of them are citizens, did not need to worry about that. As I was able to see that, I realized that, 'oh, there's so many things that revolve around not just being a DACA recipient but revolve around being a person with an undocumented status here in the United States.'"

United maintains a close relationship with the NIJC. In May of 2019, United co-hosted an asylum clinic put on by the legal services organization, where several attorneys and legal professionals were trained on representing asylum-seeking applicants. At the end of the clinic, members of our legal department were assigned an asylum case through the NIJC.

Litigation Managing Counsel Elizabeth Lopez, Commercial Transactions Counsel Tiffany Jaspers, Global Compliance and Ethics Counsel Nancy Jacobson and Employment Litigation Senior Manager Dorothy Karpierz were partnered with attorneys from the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery to take on an immigration case of a mother of three from Honduras. Recently, after a years-long court battle, the legal team was victorious, changing the life of the woman and her family.

United is committed to connecting people and uniting the world. Whether you're an immigrant, a child of immigrants or simply want to learn more about the immigrant experience in the U.S., discussions like these, related to this hot-button issue, are important to have in order to understand the human lives behind it.

Make your voice heard

By Brett J. Hart, September 22, 2020

Your voice matters. Voting is one of the most influential civic activities we can engage in as Americans. At United, our mission is to connect people and unite the world — and one of the most important ways to do that is to engage in the democratic process. That's why we've long provided our employees with resources to help them get registered to vote.

This year, we're taking our support a step further as the official airline of the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD). Since the start of the pandemic, we've overhauled our cleaning measures through a program we call United CleanPlusSM , and the CPD has placed their trust in United to fly Commission production staff to each of the four debates, starting with the first one on September 29, hosted by Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University.

Today, on National Voter Registration Day, we also want to make sure our customers have access to information about how to participate in the 2020 Election. Over the past several months, you've heard a lot from us about how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed air travel. We've learned that with some planning and extra effort, it's still possible — and safe. That's true of voting, too.

No matter which party you support or how you're planning to vote, we know our democracy will be stronger if you make your voice heard and make a plan to vote.

Best,

Brett J. Hart
President
United Airlines

United named to Year Up Opportunity Hall of Fame

By The Hub team, September 17, 2020

Since its launch 20 years ago, Year Up, one of our critical needs grant recipients, has helped more than 10,000 young adults gain access to corporate business and technical experience at large companies like United while offering the invaluable perspectives they bring with them.

On Wednesday, the nonprofit inducted United into its Opportunity Hall of Fame – a selection that occurs once every five years.

Year Up's mission is to help close the opportunity divide by providing urban young adults with the skills, experience and support that will empower them to reach their potential through professional careers and higher education. Since 2018, our partnership has allowed talented student learners the opportunity to gain corporate business experience and technical skill training at the airline while bringing their unique perspectives to our United family and culture. One of those students is Emily Lopez, who graduated from the Year Up program in January 2019 and was hired to be part of the United family as an analyst in Revenue Management.

"I moved from Venezuela to the United States in July 2016 and being a young immigrant with no resources can be difficult to pursue a career in a new country," said Emily.

After learning about Year Up and ultimately being accepted into the program, Emily landed an internship with United, an opportunity she is very grateful for.

Emily Lopez - Analyst, Pricing & Revenue Management

"Feedback from my mentors, coaches and managers was key during my internship phase and helped me convert my internship at United to a full-time position. I am grateful for the opportunity United has provided me and my Year Up Alumni colleagues to keep building a professional career within the company. I am so excited to continue building a professional career with the company and to see United being inducted to Year Up's Hall of Fame. Let's continue closing the opportunity divide!" said Emily.

Although the coronavirus pandemic has made this year's partnership a bit more difficult, we continue to do our part to support the Year Up student learners. Last month, we surprised 145 graduates of this year's Year Up Chicago program with roundtrip tickets to pursue career and networking opportunities within the United States.

"I've been personally honored and inspired to be an advocate for Year Up since I joined United," said CEO Scott Kirby. "This program gives young people from challenged backgrounds an opportunity to get their foot in the door as interns at United. This year's graduates are entering a challenging job landscape, but we have one thing that can help: a route network that provides easy access to major business markets across the United States."

Scroll to top