Where to Eat in Copenhagen Now That Noma Is Closing - United Hub
eat & drink

Where to eat in Copenhagen now that Noma is closing

By The Hub team, October 11, 2016

A decade ago, you wouldn't have heard too many people brag about traveling to Copenhagen for the food unless they were on stage doing stand-up. Now, of course, the game has changed. The unofficial statistic around the city is that one in three tourists is there to eat. The restaurant at the top of everyone's wish list is Noma, an almost impossible dream. (Even before it announced that it was closing at the end of the year, Noma averaged 20,000 calls on the one day each month that it takes reservations.)

Still, if you visited Copenhagen in the past few years, you know that the worldwide obsession with Noma and the New Nordic cooking style it helped champion—hyper-seasonal simple (if sometimes off-beat) ingredients, foraging, etc.—has had a downside. Especially if you were eating in the city for more than a few days and had only a limited appetite for pickled vegetable tops and burnt grains. Food that's delicious and intriguing for a couple of meals becomes very one note after a while, and you start badly wishing that someone would open up a good Szechuan spot or even a hot sauce stand. And when even bath soaps start using the "New Nordic" label, well, that's a trend that's run its course.

Which is why a September visit to Copenhagen yielded some pleasant surprises. More diverse cuisine is around town now, from elaborate Japanese breakfasts to incredible late-night pizzas topped with just-made mozzarella. Noma itself is evolving. When it reopens in its new location in 2017, in a hippy district with a farm, chef and owner Rene Redzepi promises a different focus. His mantra is hyper-seasonality: He's dividing the year into three distinct food seasons, not the four we've all been brought up to believe in and shop for. Instead, there will be a seafood-focused winter; produce for spring and summer; and a hunting menu for fall.

Here are eight terrific places to eat and drink around Copenhagen now.

Kadeau Copenhagen

The original location of this astonishing restaurant is on Denmark's Bornholm island, a little hotspot near Sweden frequently described as the Montauk of Scandinavia. (“You have to visit," locals will scream at you if you mention Bornholm.) Here at the recently relocated, five-year-old Copenhagen outpost, a battery of chefs work in the wide-open kitchen and take turns delivering such dishes as a side of salmon that's been both cold- and hot-smoked, served with pickled figs and cherry blossom vinaigrette. King crab comes with fresh walnuts and fruit juice made with “all the berries we can find," finished with a butter sauce.

The 18-course prix fixe menu is about $350; the wine pairings are an extra $200. You can choose juice pairings for about $100, or, best of all, have them interspersed with wine and beer throughout the meal.

Admiralgade 26

Wine drinkers around the world adore Ved Stranden 10. The place has no wine list; instead the staff will help you figure out what wine(s) you want to be drinking and set an open bottle down in front of you. Recently, the owners opened a restaurant around the corner that looks like a groovy, uncrowded Scandinavian furniture shop. At dinner, the menu features non-Scandi staples such as bouillabaisse and steak with smoked bone marrow vinaigrette. In the morning there's a savory Japanese breakfast with enough little plates and bowls to fill the table, including miso soup, cured mackerel and rice, and chawanmushi egg custard, plus fortifying green juice and coffee.

Bronnum

Copenhagen has one of the best cocktail bars in Europe; it's called Ruby. (If you're looking for Noma cooks after hours, you might well find them here.) Bronnum is the brand new spot from the Ruby team, and it's even grander, a series of six distinct rooms set in a building across from the Royal Theatre that was once a restaurant frequented by Hans Christian Anderson. Bronnum's ambitious 24-drink menu includes the "3 Martini Lunch," a flight of drinks that shows the evolution of the classic from sweet to bone dry, and the aquavit-based Memories of Aalborg, served with a nugget of cheese and hazelnuts that complement its flavors. There's also a cellar full of Champagne, with Dom Perignon 2006 poured by the glass.

Baest

Former Noma chef Christian Puglisi has built a mini restaurant empire in Copenhagen starting with the intimate, elegant Relae. (Its design, featuring silverware hidden in drawers in the dining tables, has influenced such restaurants as Manhattan's acclaimed Wildair.) Though he's a Scandi food star, Puglisi was born in Sicily, and his latest place, Baest, has a big wood-burning oven front and center. He uses fermented flour for his doughy, blistered pizzas topped with mozzarella that's made several times a day. There's a list of charcuterie and cheeses produced from the milk of cows that graze 30 miles from Baest. It's one of the few places that Noma's pastry chef Malcolm Livingston II goes out to in his limited time off. “I love the vibes, and the pizza is banging," he says.

Amass

One of the hardest reservations to get in Copenhagen is, perhaps unsurprisingly, at a place run by another ex-Noma chef, Matt Orlando. In a graffiti-covered building, Orlando cooks with ingredients from his huge garden. His epitome-of-late-summer dish is tomatoes—an unconventional ingredient in Denmark—made more unconventional with raspberry, wild rose, and burnt pine wood oil (because this is Copenhagen, after all). The chef is terrifically eco-minded: Amass is one Denmark's most sustainable restaurants, with a new gold organic certification, one of only two fine-dining places in the country to earn that achievement. Likewise, Orlando is launching a food rescue program with the Danish ministry of environment to cut down on food waste.

108

It's been billed as the more casual incarnation of Noma restaurant without Rene Redzepi in the kitchen; he's merely the co-owner now, with one of his former chefs, Kristian Baumann, doing the cooking. Some of the ingredients come from Noma's kitchen, a block away, but the place has its very own sensibility, with deceptively simple dishes. In a recent review, Bloomberg critic Richard Vines shouted out the raw lamb with last year's pickles, which he described as "Nordic steak tartare." Vines also liked the braised oxtail, glazed with fermented barley. In fact, Vines says, “The great thing is that 108 doesn't feel second-best. In fact, the buzzy dining room is more fun than at Noma."

Torvehallerne Street Food Market

As if your weekly greenmarket mated with an internationally minded Eataly, this five-year-old foodie destination in central Copenhagen has a terrific mix of 60 stands (not unlike the new Claus Meyer food hall in New York's Grand Central Station). In the outdoor plaza, Hija de Sanchez, run by Noma's ex pastry chef Rosio Sanchez, has a short menu that usually stars carnitas tacos on fresh tortillas. Within the two glass-walled halls, among the cheese and butcher and produce stands, are prepared food kiosks, such as Hallernes Smørrebrød, which specialize in glorious open-faced sandwiches topped with thick slices of smoked salmon and beef tartare. And in one corner is an outpost of the Coffee Collective, whose espresso-topped soft serve has a cult following.

Spuntino

This two-story modern Italian restaurant has been open for a while, but a recent renovation also brought on a rising star chef, Nick Curtin (from Rosette in New York). His lovely dishes include imported buratta with vibrant purple plums and pickled onions; handcut beef tartare with hazelnut oil, burnt lemon, and smoke; and spaghetti alla chitarra with brown butter and trout roe. (Take note: Copenhagen doesn't have a ton of great pasta.) The short wine list focuses on Italy with a little France and includes some orange wine, too. Spuntino's five-course menu is less than $50, which constitutes a bargain in Denmark.

©2016 Bloomberg L.P.

This article was written by Kate Krader from Bloomberg and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

Entertainment for all

By The Hub team, August 04, 2020

Our Marketing Inflight Entertainment and Connectivity team and Bridge, our Business Resource Group (BRG) for people with all abilities, partnered together to test and provide feedback on our award-winning seatback inflight entertainment (IFE) system.

Aptly named "Entertainment for all," our new seatback IFE system offers the an extensive suite of accessibility features, allowing for unassisted use by people of all visual, hearing, mobility and language abilities.

"It's nice to know that I can get on a plane and pick my favorite entertainment to enjoy, just like every customer," said Accessibility Senior Analyst and Developer and Bridge Chief of Staff Ray C., who is blind.

"As a deaf employee, the closed captioning availability on board our aircraft is something I value greatly," added Information Technology Analyst Greg O. "The new IFE further cements United's visibility within the deaf community and elsewhere. It makes me proud to be an employee."

Accessibility features of the new IFE include a text-to-speech option, explore by touch, customizable text size, screen magnification, color correction and inversion modes, and alternative navigation options for those unable to swipe or use a handset. For hearing-impaired and non-English-speaking passengers, customization options provide the ability for customers to be served content and receive inflight notifications based on their preferences and settings —with closed captions, with subtitles or in the language of their choice from the 15 languages supported. Our "Entertainment for all" system won the Crystal Cabin Award in 2019, and recently, the Dr. Margaret Pfanstiehl Research and Development Award for Audio Description by the American Council of the Blind.

"This really showed the benefits of partnering with BRGs in helping us improve products and services for our customers and employees," said Inflight Entertainment and Connectivity Senior Manager Corinne S. "Even though we have been recognized with awards for our IFE accessibility features, we are not resting on our laurels but continuing to work towards improving the inflight entertainment experience for all of our customers to ensure entertainment is available for all."

Shaping an inclusive future with Special Olympics

By The Hub team, July 24, 2020

If your travels have taken you through Chicago O'Hare International Airport anytime since October 2019, you may have had a friendly, caring and jovial exchange with Daniel Smrokowski. Daniel is one of four Service Ambassadors thanks to our ongoing partnership with Special Olympics. This inaugural ambassador program aims to provide Special Olympic athletes employment opportunities within our operation, affording them a unique and meaningful career.

Since 2018, our partnership with Special Olympics has become one of United's most cherished relationships, going beyond the events we take part in and volunteer with. While the plane pull competitions, polar plunges, duck derbies and Special Olympics World Games and other events around the world are a big part of our involvement, the heart of this partnership lies with the athletes and individuals supported by Special Olympics. To advocate for their inclusion in every setting is one of our biggest honors, and we take great pride in the role we play in the organization's inclusion revolution.

Aiding in the success of Special Olympics' mission to create continuing opportunities for individuals with intellectual disabilities, throughout the two-year partnership, United has volunteered over 10,500 hours and donated over $1.2 million in travel to the organization. The impact of this partnership is felt at every level, both at Special Olympics and within our own ranks.

"The Inclusion Revolution campaign, led by our athletes, aims to end discrimination against people with intellectual disabilities. United Airlines has joined in our fight for inclusion, empowering our athletes with the skills needed to succeed and opportunities to contribute their abilities as leaders," said Special Olympics International Chairman Tim Shriver. "United Airlines believes that people with intellectual disabilities should be perceived as they really are: independent, world-class athletes, students, employees, neighbors, travelers, and leaders who contribute to make this world a better place."

Our Service Ambassador program is just one of the many ways Special Olympics has impacted not only our employees, but also our customers. "I see every day how our Service Ambassadors connect with our customers the moment they walk into the airport lobby," said Senior Customer Service Supervisor Steve Suchorabski. "They provide a warm, welcoming smile ad assist in any way they can. To see these young adults hold positions that a society once told them they couldn't is truly the most heartwarming part of my job," Steve continued.

"The opportunity to be a part of the United family means everything to me," Daniel said. "I feel so much pride showing up to work in a Special Olympics/United co-branded uniform, working among such a loving and supportive community. The relationship between these two organizations is truly helping to shape my future while letting me use my gifts of communicating and helping others. Hopefully, I can spend my entire career at United," Daniel added.

In honor of Special Olympics' Global Week of Inclusion in July, we're asking our employees, customers and partners to sign a pledge to #ChooseToInclude at jointherevolution.org/pledge.

And be sure to check out Daniel's podcast The Special Chronicles.

United works with partners to send food to USDA food bank

By The Hub team, July 23, 2020

In collaboration with food-logistics company Commodity Forwarders Inc. (CFI), United moved nearly 190,000 pounds of fresh produce to Guam for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Coronavirus Farm Assistance Program. This new program was created to provide critical support to consumers impacted by the COVID-19 global pandemic.

A variety of fresh fruits were transported from Los Angeles (LAX) to Guam (GUM) on United's newly introduced, non-stop cargo-only flight – a route added to meet cargo demand during the COVID-19 crisis. The fresh food was repacked in 10-pound cases in Los Angeles, prepared for departure at CFI's LAX location, and flown to GUM by the United team. Through this beneficial partnership between United and CFI, the perishable goods were kept cool during every step of the process and distributed as part of the food bank program in Guam.

"Everyone on our team has worked relentlessly during the pandemic to get critical goods to where they are needed most. Establishing a comprehensive network of cargo-only flights have allowed us to keep the supply chain moving even while passenger flight capacity has been reduced," said Regional Senior Manager of Cargo Sales, Marco Vezjak. "Knowing that we are able to help during these difficult times – in this case the Guam community – is our biggest reward and greatest motivation to keep moving forward."

United is proud to play a role in maintaining the global food supply chain and helping people access the supplies they need. Since March 19, United has operated over 4,000 cargo-only flights, moving over 130 million pounds of cargo.

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